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Old 05-26-2006, 02:29 PM   #1
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Paint above the shower in the bathroom is cracking, peeling and molding pretty bad too I might add.

1 : How to prep the area for another coat of paint ? Should i scrape all loose paint, fill theh voids left with joint compound primer and then paint?

2 : Why is there a mold problem in the first place? How do I get rid of it and how to prevent it?

3 : What kind of primer / paint should I use? Is there a particular type that works better in bathrooms?

Thanks
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Old 05-26-2006, 05:18 PM   #2
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Is there an exhaust fan in this bathroom?
If the mold isn't bad you can spray with bleach to kill it. After it dries and is dead you can prime with a good sealer. Then use a SW bath paint.
If the mold is bad you might want to open the ceiling up and replace the rock. Allow the area to dry and kill any mold before closing it back up.
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Old 05-26-2006, 06:12 PM   #3
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Quote:
Originally Posted by MinConst
Is there an exhaust fan in this bathroom?
If the mold isn't bad you can spray with bleach to kill it. After it dries and is dead you can prime with a good sealer. Then use a SW bath paint.
If the mold is bad you might want to open the ceiling up and replace the rock. Allow the area to dry and kill any mold before closing it back up.
What kind of mixture on the bleach do you reccomend?
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Old 05-26-2006, 06:41 PM   #4
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Yes the Mold must be killed
I prefer X-14 (paint shop, hardware store), but 50/50 bleach/water works also
Be careful, and take precautions, as both can be hard on the lungs and bleach-stain cloths
(Open windows and a respirator)

Once it's dead, if there are stains left, you'll want to seal them
Zinsser's BIN shellac-based primer/sealer is the best for this
And really the only thing I'll use for sealing bad mold/mildew stains

Again, take precautions as the BIN is a bit whiffy
(Open windows and a respirator)

Yes, you'll want to scrape and sand any loose or poorly adhering areas before priming/sealing

If you need to use joint compound, that would come after the BIN
Re-prime after you're done (but that can be a latex primer)

The absolute best mold/mildew resistant paint would be Zinsser's Perma-White
I strongly recommend it
The only drawback is it's only tintable light colors and pastels

If you want a darker color, the Ben Moore "Moore's K&B" is the next best thing
I'm sure the Sherwin Williams product is comparable also, bit I have not used it
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Old 05-26-2006, 08:13 PM   #5
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Alan,
The question on why it is there was why I asked if there was an exhaust fan in the bathroom. Be sure there is or add one. It will remove the moisture from the room that causes the mold. Be sure it is vented to the outside.
You other questions were answered by slickshift.
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Old 05-29-2006, 09:58 PM   #6
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Quote:
Originally Posted by MinConst
...an exhaust fan in the bathroom. Be sure there is or add one. It will remove the moisture from the room that causes the mold. Be sure it is vented to the outside.
That's pretty important
If there is one make sure it works and is vented properly
If there isn't, that should be a priority
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Old 05-30-2006, 12:54 PM   #7
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Quote:
Originally Posted by MinConst
Alan,
The question on why it is there was why I asked if there was an exhaust fan in the bathroom. Be sure there is or add one. It will remove the moisture from the room that causes the mold. Be sure it is vented to the outside.
You other questions were answered by slickshift.
There is indeed an exhaust fan in the bathroom. No windows, however. I'm not sure where it vents to, but maybe tonight i'll climb up into the "attic" and see just where it goes.

I'll probably be getting a new fan when we fix that room anyhow. The one in there is pretty old and ugly looking.

Thanks guys
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Old 05-30-2006, 02:49 PM   #8
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


If you have kids living at home that take 35 minute showers who always seem to forget to turn the fan on, I would recommend that the new fan you buy be wired so that it comes on automatically when the light is switched on.
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Old 05-30-2006, 03:52 PM   #9
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I checked at lunch, and there appears to be a vent over the bathroom right next to the skylight.....
i pulled the cover from the fan and i can see a type of aluminum ducting attached to the fan's output. I wasn't able to figure out how to get the entire thing out without damaging the sheetrock, so i couldn't see really where the ducting went.

GREAT idea on the light/fan being wired together.

Perhaps a more efficient fan would also be helpful? Any suggestions?

Edit : I just looked and see a number of fans ranging anywhere from 50cfm to 130cfm. I'm definitely willing to drop the extra money on a higher capacity fan if that will contribute a lot to mold prevention. I also see a lot of fans are UL listed to be mounted above a shower with GFCI circuit <<<--- whats that? The current exhaust fan is located in the middle of the room. How worthwhile would it be to relocate the new fan above the shower stall? Is 4" ducting the standard size ? I can't see into the hole well enough to decide what size ducting I have up there already.

Last edited by Alan; 05-30-2006 at 04:05 PM.
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Old 05-30-2006, 05:08 PM   #10
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Your fan was probably installed before the ceiling drywall went up, so it was easy access for the installer. Now, ( as a last resort) you might have to enlarge the opening a little by cutting the drywall to remove the fan. Go to one of the big box stores and look at one of the new fans to see how they are mounted. They're really quite simple and this might help you figure out how to replace your old fan. Or you could try to post a picture of your old fan in the ceiling here I think a high cfm, low noise level fan in your existing location will be sufficient to vent out the humidity, and much less work than moving it over above the shower

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Old 05-30-2006, 05:27 PM   #11
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Found this on a website. There may be other models available.


__________________________________________________ ________-
Broan SensAire Humidity Sensor Exhaust Fans
BR-HS90, BR-HS130 & BR-HS120L


The Broan SensAire series humidity sensing exhaust fans add simplicity, luxury and convenience of "hands-free" bath fan operation thanks to the use of sensors. The humidity sensing fan detects rapid increase in humidity brought on by the bath or shower and turns on the fan automatically. You can adjust the automatic shut off time anywhere from 5-60 minutes which prevents cosmetic and structural problems associated with mold and mildew.


BR-HS90, BR-HS130 shown above
* Requires 4" round ducting - not included
* UL listed for installation over a tub or shower on a GFCI circuit


Series Features:

90 CFM / 2.5 sones - 130 CFM / 3.5 sone centrifugal blower
Humidity sensor controls the fan by turning the fan on when rapid to moderate humidity is detected or when humidity reaches the user defined set-point.
24 gauge galvanized steel fan housing
HS120L model takes 100 W incandescent bulb and one 7 W nightlight bulb (not included)
Includes non-yellowing White low profile polymeric grill - 11 1/2" sq.
Adjustable automatic shut off timer from 5 - 60 minutes
Exclusive 7 5/8" high housing accommodates 2" x 8" ceiling joists and mounts between joists or directly to joists with adjustable mounting bracket which spans up to 24"
Includes 4" round duct connector with backdraft damper
Left or right horizontal ducting options
HS120L model is Type IC rated (Insulation Contact)
UL, CUL, HVI Certified
120 volts, 60 Hz
BR-HS90 & BR-HS130: 10.5 Lbs.
BR-HS120L: 10.8 Lbs.
Ships via UPS
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Old 05-30-2006, 06:23 PM   #12
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


When all is said and done, be sure to use at least a semi-gloss paint on the ceilings for a finish coat. This will help prevent moisture penatration into the substrate. Don't use flat paint for walls either, at least a satin/egg-shell sheen. Usually, the higher the sheen, the better the moisture resistance of the paint due to higher solids content. Follow slick's advice, he knows what he's talking about. Stick with acrylic latex topcoats in the sheens I described, and you can use almost any product.
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Old 05-30-2006, 06:25 PM   #13
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Quote:
Originally Posted by ron schenker
Your fan was probably installed before the ceiling drywall went up, so it was easy access for the installer. Now, ( as a last resort) you might have to enlarge the opening a little by cutting the drywall to remove the fan. Go to one of the big box stores and look at one of the new fans to see how they are mounted. They're really quite simple and this might help you figure out how to replace your old fan. Or you could try to post a picture of your old fan in the ceiling here I think a high cfm, low noise level fan in your existing location will be sufficient to vent out the humidity, and much less work than moving it over above the shower
I will post a picture tonight. It feels like its just sitting on the sheetrock. I can move it up and down, and i can see some little flat supports that look like they're riveted to 2 sides extending beyond the edges of the hole. No telling how far though. Pictures coming.

Edit : I read now that a bathroom fan should be able to handle 8 air changes per hour. Anyone ever heard of that before? Also : An installation guide mentions running the ducting out to the nearest end of the house and venting thru the soffit. :confused: I think mine goes straight up through the roof. Are both acceptable venting techniques?

Last edited by Alan; 05-30-2006 at 07:03 PM.
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Old 05-30-2006, 07:43 PM   #14
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


going by the 8 airchange/hr guideline i mentioned above, a 70CFM fan should be sufficient ( I only need 50)

So if I can get a nice quiet 100 CFM fan, that should REALLY help a lot.

Here are the pictures (nevermind the crappy paint/drywall seams)

here you can see the two supports up inside the hole that are holding the light in.
http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...Stuff/mold.JPG

here's the nasty mold itself... RAWR!
http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...tuff/mold2.JPG
Another shot of the mold
http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...tuff/mold3.JPG
Overall picture of the bathroom
http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...tuff/mold4.JPG
Overall picture of the light/fan.
http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...tuff/mold5.JPG
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Old 06-06-2006, 01:32 PM   #15
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Holy canoly - Bathroom mold


Great posts everyone! The last thing I would check would be the clearance of the bathroom door at the bottom. This is where most fresh air is brought in from. Lots of times it fits so close to the door bottom that the fan cannot bring in enough air to pull the moisture out and thru the vent in a timely fashion. I prefer about a 1/2".
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