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-   -   HGTV--What Not To Do (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/hgtv-what-not-do-118948/)

jsheridan 10-02-2011 06:31 AM

HGTV--What Not To Do
 
Something about Home and Garden Television has been bothering me for some time now, and it's time to speak out. It's definitely applicable to what our aim is here at DIYChatroom, and that is helping homeowners better handle their home painting projects. What I take objection to is the mockery they make of painting. After watching the utter jokes I saw yesterday, I decided it's time. If this was a pro forum, I would say that what they do leaves an impression in homeowner's minds that it is what we do and that impression makes justifying our prices that much harder. But, it's not a pro forum. But, for the homeowner, it teaches very bad habits. And, if you do your project following the example they present, you'll have a horrible outcome. Granted, their stance is to show you what to do, not exactly how to do it. But, they're supposed "pros" in the home improvement field and they could at least guide homeowners in the proper procedure. What are some of the things I find so objectionable:
  • There is absolutely no work area set-up. No furniture is condensed or covered in plastic.
  • No drop cloths. They had a small square drop in the center area where they opened and poured paint, and then rolled over exposed tile floors.
  • They work out of full paint cans. NO, NO, NO
  • They roll prior to cutting in. In spite of what some do, you will not get optimal results if you cut in after rolling. Period. This is especially so above flat sheens.
  • They start rolling in the middle of the wall, and compound that error by rolling every which way. Wrong, wrong, wrong.
  • I've seen them use a one inch roller nap on smooth surfaces and use little six inch mini rollers to roll big walls. A one inch cover on smooth walls will leave a horrible finish look and mini rollers will as well on a large area, beside the absolute waste of time.
  • They never use rolling poles. A rolling pole, used properly, will enhance the outcome of the job. And, a rolling pole will take the strain off the elbow, so there's a health benefit to it as well.
I could go on, but I hit the main points. I've even seen commercials by the majors who portray the same wrong procedures. Those who take their cue by watching these shows will screw up and come here with questions on fixing the mistakes. And, we know what the adopted attitude is about that course of action. How do I get the lines out of my paint, should I spackle? How do I clean paint off the tile floor? I brushed my cut in after I rolled and now the cut in is obvious. You can hear them now. Please, use HGTV to develop ideas about decorating. But, under no circumstance, take how they portray the task of painting as the way it is done, it's not real world. I'm constantly disappointed with their approach. I have an informative article on the subject of proper paint job set up procedures, please read. I'm not self-promoting, as I get no benefit from anyone reading it, no pay per click or whatever. I'm here to help people do their DIY painting projects smarter, better, faster.
Joe

kwikfishron 10-02-2011 06:42 AM

Maybe itís time for your own show Joe. :thumbup:

oh'mike 10-02-2011 06:59 AM

Actually Ron the time might be right for that---A show with real pros showing the details that make or break a job---

When have you ever seen the details on a door install?

Or any host inspecting a floor system prior to installing tile?

On second thought that might be boring -----Mike---

jsheridan 10-02-2011 07:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 740058)
Maybe itís time for your own show Joe. :thumbup:

:laughing: I was told once by a girlfriend that I love the limelight, but hate the spotlight. I was floored by her accurate reading of me. Funny you say that though, a decorator friend of mine has a close friend who is a producer in the home improvement tv field, not sure which or where, but she suggested the same thing. It was a thrilling fantasy for about five minutes. Ty has no fear:laughing:
I'm too simple a man Ron. Smarts is not exactly my stronger point, it's more my ability to explain the little bit I do know, or so I've been told, on both points.

jsheridan 10-02-2011 07:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 740065)
Actually Ron the time might be right for that---A show with real pros showing the details that make or break a job---

When have you ever seen the details on a door install?

Or any host inspecting a floor system prior to installing tile?

On second thought that might be boring -----Mike---

Exactamundo!

jsheridan 10-02-2011 07:07 AM

Well, I wasn't sure my thread would pass Moderator scrutiny, passed one hurdle.

oh'mike 10-02-2011 07:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 740070)
Well, I wasn't sure my thread would pass Moderator scrutiny, passed one hurdle.

If something is interesting--I leave it---and this topic is spot on as far as I see it.

I recently went to look at a bathroom in a 100 year old house---
Complete gut--new window--one new wall--move all plumbing--and more-

I told the 2 weeks for two men working 7 days a week----

Customer dropped his teeth---"But the room is so small!"

Perhaps he thought it could be done in 60 minutes with time out for commercials.:whistling2:

Jackofall1 10-02-2011 07:37 AM

:no:
Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 740078)
If something is interesting--I leave it---and this topic is spot on as far as I see it.

I recently went to look at a bathroom in a 100 year old house---
Complete gut--new window--one new wall--move all plumbing--and more-

I told the 2 weeks for two men working 7 days a week----

Customer dropped his teeth---"But the room is so small!"

Perhaps he thought it could be done in 60 minutes with time out for commercials.:whistling2:

That is so true.......some folks just don't know what it takes.....:no:

oh'mike 10-02-2011 07:48 AM

Frankly I was glad they didn't go for it----My price was a giveaway---Customer is the son of a friend

Got a super price---to good---I think this young couple simply had no idea what it would cost to restore an antique house---They are decent kids ---just never dealt with remodeling --that's why we are here!!

jsheridan 10-02-2011 07:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackofall1 (Post 740081)
:no:

That is so true.......some folks just don't know what it takes.....:no:

Certainly is not limited to painting trade. In addition to time factors, I see price ridiculousness as well. On the flip shows, they quote sub contractor prices, not all, but most prices as way low. Who knows what the show picks up, what the flipper actually pays, or if the sub is giving a guaranteed to get price just to be on the show. I saw one flip show where the exterior painting was $800.00. Couple of guys, a spray rig, all stucco and all trim. $800.00? Highly unlikely in any market. That leaves an impression in people's minds that is unrealistic. I couldn't comment officially on other trade prices, but just from being around the trades for so long, I could say many were very suspect.

jsheridan 10-02-2011 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 740090)
Frankly I was glad they didn't go for it----My price was a giveaway---Customer is the son of a friend

Got a super price---to good---I think this young couple simply had no idea what it would cost to restore an antique house---They are decent kids ---just never dealt with remodeling --that's why we are here!!

Mike, antique = qauint = $$$$$, that's what I was taught.

kwikfishron 10-02-2011 08:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 740078)

2 weeks for two men

"But the room is so small!"

Which is exactly why I rarely do bathrooms. It takes a special kind of guy to work under those conditions, and that guy isnít me. :laughing:

oh'mike 10-02-2011 08:11 AM

Half a lifetime ago,I was working on a historic home built in 1864---

I under bid that one badly. Another contractor was on the job and gave me some sage advice---

" With these old places you need to figure your costs--double them and add 20% --then you just might break even,"

He was a wise man---Mike----

jsheridan 10-02-2011 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 740097)
Which is exactly why I rarely do bathrooms. It takes a special kind of guy to work under those conditions, and that guy isnít me. :laughing:

:laughing: Ron, I met a plumber once, he had to weigh 400 lbs, no exaggeration. Knowing the tight places that plumbers need to access, I couldn't believe it. I asked how he manages, he said "not easily". He must be sweating pipes, literally, in more ways than one. I weight about 175, and the amount of effort just cutting paint behind toilets is tough for me.

jsheridan 10-02-2011 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 740108)
Half a lifetime ago,I was working on a historic home built in 1864---

I under bid that one badly. Another contractor was on the job and gave me some sage advice---

" With these old places you need to figure your costs--double them and add 20% --then you just might break even,"

He was a wise man---Mike----

:thumbsup: Learned that lesson the hard way myself.


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