DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Painting (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/)
-   -   Help with repainting exterior latex (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/help-repainting-exterior-latex-25302/)

hellothere123 08-16-2008 05:30 PM

Help with repainting exterior latex
 
Good day,

First time post.

I have X90 on my house, hasn't been painted in 15 yrs. I scraped all the old loose paint off and am getting close to prime and painting.

Questions:

1) On some boards the paint came off right to the wood itself. So on a given board I have some old paint that still stuck and the bare wood itself. I sanded the edge as best I could, but there is always a little "lip" or edge where the old paint and wood meet. I don't want to see this edge when I am complete...it I spot prime will that fill this in? or am I forced to remove all paint off each board?

2) Since it is latex, it is best to just reapply new latex right? Some said I should change it to oil based.

3) TSP is for oil based...can I use it on my latex exterior paint?

4) As far as paint brand preferences... so far here is my list from first choice to last based upon price and reviews....Benjamin Moore, Pittsburgh Paint, Glidden, General am I out of wack? Not too sure what to look for when buying paint.

That's it...looking forward to contibuting some hands on things I have done.

slickshift 08-16-2008 06:34 PM

1) Your Masonite may not be able to be sanded like wood, though you should feather it as much as possible
I always say paint colors and protects, it doesn't fill....but, in your case a High Build paint (Like Aura Flat/Low Lustre or Duration) may help

2) I can't see any reason to switch to oil at this point

3) TSP is not just for oil-based, it's used for just about anything
Yes, you can use it and I'd recommend it

4) The premium exterior paints from Ben Moore, Sherwin Williams, Pittsburgh, are all pretty good
As I mentioned before, a high build from BM (Aura) or SW (Duration) may be more of what you are looking for

Nestor_Kelebay 08-17-2008 12:00 AM

1. Before you give up on sanding, try using a better sandpaper. Since I tried it, I won't use anything but premium aluminum oxide. It's much sharper and much harder so that the paper lasts longer, but more importantly, it just makes sanding easier. At your local home center, look for Norton "3X" sandpapers, with the 3X meaning they cut three times faster and last 3 times longer. Better sandpaper makes sanding easier.

2. There are different schools of thought, but my feeling is that an exterior alkyd paint forms a stronger film that will last longer.

3. Try cleaning with TSP. The notion of cleaning with TSP is passed down to us from the 1950's when all paints were oil based paints (Glidden came out with the first interior latex paints in 1959). TSP isn't sold in the cleaning aisle of your local home center or grocery store because it really isn't a very good cleaner, nor is it much of a "degreaser" (even if you adopt a very liberal interpretation of that word's meaning). What made cleaning with TSP a "must" was that it would "etch" the gloss of oil based paints, so that the next coat of paint adhered better. Consequently, even if TSP was a lousy cleaner, it did make the underlying coat flat, so that the top coat would stick very well.
So, try cleaning some of your latex paint with TSP and see if you notice ANY reduction in the gloss at all. If you do see a significant dulling of the existing paint's gloss, then by all means continue cleaning with it. If you really can't see any difference in the gloss after cleaning with a strong solution of TSP, rinsing with clean water and allowing time to dry, then you'd be better off using a better cleaner, like Fantastic or Mr. Clean, instead. (Maybe don't buy very much TSP until you know if it's going to work for you.)

4. Don't skimp on paint quality. It takes the same amount of work to paint your house with a lousy paint as a really good paint. And, with paint, you pretty well get what you pay for. The trick is to buy the most expensive paint from the place that sells it the cheapest.

Now, can I ask you a question?

Have you given any thought to colour and the level of gloss? Are you aware that some colours hide better and fade very much less than others? Flat paints hide an underlying colour much better than gloss paints.

hellothere123 08-17-2008 05:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay (Post 149276)
1. Before you give up on sanding, try using a better sandpaper. Since I tried it, I won't use anything but premium aluminum oxide. It's much sharper and much harder so that the paper lasts longer, but more importantly, it just makes sanding easier. At your local home center, look for Norton "3X" sandpapers, with the 3X meaning they cut three times faster and last 3 times longer. Better sandpaper makes sanding easier.

2. There are different schools of thought, but my feeling is that an exterior alkyd paint forms a stronger film that will last longer.

3. Try cleaning with TSP. The notion of cleaning with TSP is passed down to us from the 1950's when all paints were oil based paints (Glidden came out with the first interior latex paints in 1959). TSP isn't sold in the cleaning aisle of your local home center or grocery store because it really isn't a very good cleaner, nor is it much of a "degreaser" (even if you adopt a very liberal interpretation of that word's meaning). What made cleaning with TSP a "must" was that it would "etch" the gloss of oil based paints, so that the next coat of paint adhered better. Consequently, even if TSP was a lousy cleaner, it did make the underlying coat flat, so that the top coat would stick very well.
So, try cleaning some of your latex paint with TSP and see if you notice ANY reduction in the gloss at all. If you do see a significant dulling of the existing paint's gloss, then by all means continue cleaning with it. If you really can't see any difference in the gloss after cleaning with a strong solution of TSP, rinsing with clean water and allowing time to dry, then you'd be better off using a better cleaner, like Fantastic or Mr. Clean, instead. (Maybe don't buy very much TSP until you know if it's going to work for you.)

4. Don't skimp on paint quality. It takes the same amount of work to paint your house with a lousy paint as a really good paint. And, with paint, you pretty well get what you pay for. The trick is to buy the most expensive paint from the place that sells it the cheapest.

Now, can I ask you a question?

Have you given any thought to colour and the level of gloss? Are you aware that some colours hide better and fade very much less than others? Flat paints hide an underlying colour much better than gloss paints.


thanks both of you for the info...it definetly helps out!


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:44 PM.