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streetneons 01-20-2013 04:04 PM

Garage floor Epoxy
 
So I want to paint my garage floor with rustoleum epoxy professional kit which is the two-part solvent based epoxy. My question is after I prep the floor and clean it, should I also purchase and use a concrete primer, the kit doesn't include or even say you should use a primer but to me it just seems like an extra step to insure a proper job. Also on my garage floor is the standard concrete lines, I was wondering what could I use to fill in the gap and make the floor look like one big smooth surface instead of the line. Any advice or tips would be great.

jsheridan 01-20-2013 08:13 PM

I've painted a few floors with expoxies, but never used a kit. I didn't prime them. I would follow the kits advice. You might want to do a few moisture tests before you paint. Take some 18" square pieces of plastic sheathing and tape them airtight to the floor with duct tape. If you get condensation after so many hours it may not hold a finish. Ground moisture travels through concrete. It may not be enough to see or do damage, but it may be just enough to give your coating trouble. This was the advice given me by someone with much greater experience painting floors than I had. And I'm no concrete guy, or engineer, but I believe the "lines" you are talking about are expansion joints, so if you patch them they may just crack on you. Someone might come along and tell me I'm full of poop. But I've never had a callback.

joecaption 01-20-2013 08:19 PM

100% right.
The kits I've used came with two cans one was the primer.
The Rustolium kits have worked really good for me.

ric knows paint 01-20-2013 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by streetneons (Post 1098032)
So I want to paint my garage floor with rustoleum epoxy professional kit which is the two-part solvent based epoxy. My question is after I prep the floor and clean it, should I also purchase and use a concrete primer, the kit doesn't include or even say you should use a primer but to me it just seems like an extra step to insure a proper job. Also on my garage floor is the standard concrete lines, I was wondering what could I use to fill in the gap and make the floor look like one big smooth surface instead of the line. Any advice or tips would be great.

I'm curious why you're using the solvent borne epoxy instead of the water-borne garage floor kit...I can think of only a few examples where the solvent borne would be the better recommendation than the water borne, but none for a residential garage floor - it'll never be exposed to that type of traffic.

Anyway, whichever system you use, it is NOT necessary (nor recommended) to prime first. I would say that if you are using the solvent borne system, it'd be best to thin the first coat with the appropriate solvent - at a rate of about 10 percent - but the manufacturer won't support that since, by doing so, they'd be giving you a green light to knock the product out of VOC compliancy..Sooo, don't do that.

Primers, by nature and design, are softer than are epoxy finish coats (even epoxy primers), and cannot withstand the ravages/stress brought on by any and all types of motor vehicle traffic (even with the harder finish coat over it). It is far more important to do complete surface prep on the floor AND properly etch the floor in accordance to the manufacturers instructions.

Best of luck to you.

jsheridan 01-20-2013 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1098210)
100% right.
The kits I've used came with two cans one was the primer.
The Rustolium kits have worked really good for me.

WHAT is 100% right?
Two part epoxy comes with two cans/parts, the base, and the activator.

joecaption 01-20-2013 11:20 PM

Moisture test, no primer, do not fill the expantion cracks. I was commenting on the first reply.

chrisn 01-21-2013 03:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1098210)
100% right.
The kits I've used came with two cans one was the primer.:eek:
The Rustolium kits have worked really good for me.


say what???:whistling2:

jsheridan 01-21-2013 04:23 AM

Me too:whistling2:

streetneons 01-21-2013 09:10 AM

Well it doesn't have to be the solvent kit but from what I read online its the only way to go. I do not plan on parking in the garage so hot tire lift of the paint will not be an issue I just want the garage to look nice and get rid of the oil stains from the previous owner. As for the expansion lines I wanted to fill that in because they have chipped and cracked away and need to repair the few areas to make it look nice.

jeffnc 01-21-2013 12:12 PM

You don't need a primer but you need, for a good job:
a) good cleaning of grease oil
b) acid etching of the surface unless it's already rough feeling
c) power washing to clear the cement "dust" after acid etching.

If you don't need to park a car in there, you can do fine without epoxy. Epoxy is a mess to work with, but it's very sturdy. What makes it look good is a layer of polyurethane on top, IMO. (Assuming you're using flakes, without them it will probably be too slippery to walk on with wet shoes.)

cdaniels 01-21-2013 03:55 PM

The garage floor kits that I use are made by Quickrete they are a two part epoxy-no primer-come with the cleaner, acid for etching and color flakes which are optional.They also have sealer that is sold separately to top coat with after the floor is dry.Comes with an instructional video just follow the directions exactly.It makes a very good looking and durable garage floor. This kit is a waterborne epoxy.

ric knows paint 01-21-2013 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by streetneons (Post 1098519)
Well it doesn't have to be the solvent kit but from what I read online its the only way to go. I do not plan on parking in the garage so hot tire lift of the paint will not be an issue I just want the garage to look nice and get rid of the oil stains from the previous owner. As for the expansion lines I wanted to fill that in because they have chipped and cracked away and need to repair the few areas to make it look nice.

Hey Street...

An old school thought is that a solvent borne is a better product than a water-borne - and once upon a time that was absolutely true. Not so much today though...to begin with, most (many) of today's water borne (WB) epoxies are actually true epoxies - not the acrylic modified, epoxy esters versions of old. They are much more durable than earlier versions (circa 1980's & 90's)...and there is very little difference from a performance perspective between solvent and wb. Typically, if additional durability is experienced with a solvent borne, it's more likely due to a heavier film build (in fewer apps) than what you'd typically experience with a WB. So, if that's the only advantage, take a look at the advantages a WB offers: (1) Soap and water clean-up (2) faster dry than solvent (3) no strong solvent smell (4) no fire hazard (5) little chance of reaction to existing coatings as compared to hot-solvent/solvent borne products, and (6) usually no induction time once mixing A & B, and (7) most (many) WB epoxies have better resistance to chalk and fading than do solvent borne counter-parts*.

* (7) is not actually a true statement. WB epoxies are often (not always) a poly-amine cure epoxy compared to solvent bornes which are often (not always) a poly-amide cure. Poly-amine cure typically weathers better than poly-amide even though neither is necessarily recommended for exterior use (where chalking may be a problem).

From an application perspective, it's probably slightly cheaper on a cost per square foot basis to go with solvent borne...but the ease of application advantage goes to the WB - a little "stickier" than conventional water-borne products, but rolls easily and flows beautifully.

Hope that info helps.

jsheridan 01-21-2013 07:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ric knows paint (Post 1098977)
Hey Street...

An old school thought is that a solvent borne is a better product than a water-borne - and once upon a time that was absolutely true. Not so much today though...to begin with, most (many) of today's water borne (WB) epoxies are actually true epoxies - not the acrylic modified, epoxy esters versions of old. They are much more durable than earlier versions (circa 1980's & 90's)...and there is very little difference from a performance perspective between solvent and wb. Typically, if additional durability is experienced with a solvent borne, it's more likely due to a heavier film build (in fewer apps) than what you'd typically experience with a WB. So, if that's the only advantage, take a look at the advantages a WB offers: (1) Soap and water clean-up (2) faster dry than solvent (3) no strong solvent smell (4) no fire hazard (5) little chance of reaction to existing coatings as compared to hot-solvent/solvent borne products, and (6) usually no induction time once mixing A & B, and (7) most (many) WB epoxies have better resistance to chalk and fading than do solvent borne counter-parts*.

* (7) is not actually a true statement. WB epoxies are often (not always) a poly-amine cure epoxy compared to solvent bornes which are often (not always) a poly-amide cure. Poly-amine cure typically weathers better than poly-amide even though neither is necessarily recommended for exterior use (where chalking may be a problem).

From an application perspective, it's probably slightly cheaper on a cost per square foot basis to go with solvent borne...but the ease of application advantage goes to the WB - a little "stickier" than conventional water-borne products, but rolls easily and flows beautifully.

Hope that info helps.

I agree:laughing:
Thanks Ric
Do the WB's require a mechanical mix like the solvents?

streetneons 01-21-2013 08:48 PM

Thanks ric. Any recommendations on brand or products to buy?

pwgsx 01-23-2013 09:40 AM

I have used the Rustoleum epoxy on my garage and it is great. Had a garage fire and it didnt bubble or anyhting, had some black spots but it held up :thumbsup:. In the morning Prep the floor from dust, stuck on glue etc. Then mix up the powder etcher and scrub the floor with it, let it sit and then rinse off really well. Make sure the cement is dry- you will want to wait till the next day or 2. Mix the cans as directed really well and start painting. Only do a 4x4 area at a time if your spreading the color chips. Work your way out of the garage and let it dry. IT will become dry to the touch in 4-6 hours depending on temp, longer if its cold. You can walk on it the next day but cannot drive on it for 4 days I think?? You will love it and it lasts forever. Also there is no bad or strong smell. I would use the clear coat that is optional, I didnt but wish I had done it.


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