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Old 05-25-2010, 08:23 PM   #1
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Flashing --> how does it occur and how to prevent it


I have been having a discussion with an associate of mine, and we cannot come up with a straight answer to a simple problem.

1. what is flashing? (a good definition)
2. How does flashing occur?
3. How do you prevent flashing from occurring. Ever.

thanks
-g

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Old 05-25-2010, 10:54 PM   #2
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Flashing --> how does it occur and how to prevent it


1 Unevenness in the finish coat's sheen,luster

2 Unsealed/unprimed surfaces absorb paint at different rates. This tends to make the finish thinner/thicker in places

3 Good primer/sealer and good paint. Good technique and sometimes good even second coat after the first is dry.

Basic expaination, but it gives you something to go on for interior painting.


P.s. where is your flashing occuring?

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Old 05-25-2010, 11:11 PM   #3
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Flashing --> how does it occur and how to prevent it


Flashing is caused more by the pulling of wet paint onto an already dried surface. The very edge where you left off doesn't dry like an evenly painted surface so you see a difference in the sheen. Try keeping a wet edge and roll as close as you can to every edge.
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Old 05-25-2010, 11:49 PM   #4
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Flashing --> how does it occur and how to prevent it


Trying to get too much paint out of a roller will also cause this. Keep the roller fairly well wet with paint. I always paint into the wet area and start at the top and make one pass down in the area I just painted all the way over to where I left off. This helps me to avoid lap marks and roller lines.

It can also be caused by spot priming or not priming a patched area.

Last edited by boman47k; 05-25-2010 at 11:54 PM.
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Old 05-26-2010, 09:15 PM   #5
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Flashing --> how does it occur and how to prevent it


Quote:
Originally Posted by boman47k View Post
I always paint into the wet area and start at the top and make one pass down in the area I just painted all the way over to where I left off. This helps me to avoid lap marks and roller lines.
Can you please elaborate on this point or rephrase?
-gramps
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Old 05-27-2010, 12:11 AM   #6
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Flashing --> how does it occur and how to prevent it


When I paint trim, I start away from my last stroke of the brush. Move over a little and paint back into the wet area. My last brush stroke is always from near the dry area all the way back into the wet where I lift my brush while still moving in an attempt to feather or blend my last stroke.

When I roll a wall, I will make several passes in an area. Say I start in the left corner. I make a few passes to the right Then I will remove the roller from the wall and go back to the corner and roll from near the top all the way to the bottom as close as I can, raise the roller and move over to the next pass where I will again start near the top and bring my roller down over that pass and so on. If I start these roll offs with downward passes, I do them all in a downward passes. I try to overlap a little when I do these passes to remove any roller lines that may be in the paint from the edge of the roller.

If, for some reason, I only get part way down the wall and have to rewet my roller, I will start below the wet paint and work my roller up into it with my last stroke being in the wet paint I am painting into. I raise my roller while it is still in motion so as not to leave a heavy lap mark. Then when I do my roll over with my roller not so wet, it helps to even out the lap marks. BY not so wet, I mean when I decide it is time to back and do my roll overs, I do not rewet my roller with paint. It has no excess paint, as I am not laying paint. I am leveling/blending paint already on the wall.


Btw, I also keep my roller turned the same way from the start of a wall to the end. If I start with frame of the roller to my right, I do the complete wall with the frame to my right.

I hope I didn't ramble to the point of being too confusing, and this some help.

P.S. When rolling paint, keep the roller wet. Don't try to spread the paint to far. This can waste time and cause thin places. Don't put a ;ot of pressure on the roller. If you hear the roller going whomp!whomp! whomp!, you may be applying too much pressure which can cause roller lines at the ends of the roller as paint is being squeezed out of the roller, or the roller is too dry which can cause light/thin places in the paint.

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Last edited by boman47k; 05-27-2010 at 12:19 AM.
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