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-   -   Finishing Up Garage Walls (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/finishing-up-garage-walls-165335/)

KevinWP 12-02-2012 01:09 AM

Finishing Up Garage Walls
 
Okay, so after searching, this is what I'm learning. If I'm going to finish up the walls in my garage I need to:
  • Lay down another few lines of tape on the drywall seams.
  • Use a flat colored paint to reduce the inevitable flaws.
  • Use an exterior paint because winters can get below freezing.
I'm sure this job isn't that difficult, I've just never done it. Any other advice?
  • What do you do when the tape just isn't enough? Spackle?
  • Do most people use a paint and primer combo?
  • Is using a spray gun advised?
Any help is appreciated for this newbie!


- Kevin

oh'mike 12-02-2012 06:42 AM

Are the seams taped now and is any of it loose?

If it's taped you are ready to mud it----You will need blades--6"-10" and 12"

Mud----there are three types---powdered light weight easy sand--20-45-90--minute setting time---
used to pack gaps and holes--fill corner bead---often used for the first coat of compound over the tape---
sets fast--very hard--tough to sand.

All Purpose---green lid---contains glue and is used to embed the tape---may use it for all coats---
Hard to sand---but softer than the powdered mix

Light weight--blue lid--topping compound---slow drying---easy to sand---used for final coat.

Apply a fill coat---then apply a topping coat---several vary thin coats are best---feather out the butt joints to 20 or 24 inches---

inside corners about 6 inches.

As to paint---interior is fine---roll it---one primer to seal the paper--then touch ups of the mud job--then a quick over all sanding to knock off any bits of crud that got into the paint.---Then two coats of a good interior paint----

A painter will be along-----Mike----

chrisn 12-02-2012 06:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinWP (Post 1064767)
Okay, so after searching, this is what I'm learning. If I'm going to finish up the walls in my garage I need to:
  • Lay down another few lines of tape on the drywall seams.:no:
  • Use a flat colored paint to reduce the inevitable flaws.
  • Use an exterior paint because winters can get below freezing.:no:
I'm sure this job isn't that difficult, I've just never done it. Any other advice?
  • What do you do when the tape just isn't enough? Spackle?
  • Do most people use a paint and primer combo?:no:
  • Is using a spray gun advised?:no:
Any help is appreciated for this newbie!


- Kevin

listen to the stinky one above
prime with a drywall primer and any flat paint from a real paint store

pinkfloyd43 12-02-2012 08:20 AM

Although I am not expert, but have painted the garage.

Be sure everything is clean as garages seem to get all kinds of dirt, everywhere! Cleaning is important and I have learned this by messing
up a few times before

Do your best to fix-up all the joints. I did a little of this but as it was a garage and didn't worry about it much. Don't know how fancy you want your garage to be. I removed everything from the walls and fixed all the
holes and ended up putting holes back in for tool holders and such

Do get the paint from a paint store. Although I am new here I recently purchased paint from SW and was very pleased with the results.

The exterior paint sounds right if it's that cold there and probably is
not that much more??

Prime and sand and clean again. Surprizing how much dust, etc is in a garage when you are doing this stuff

Always plan on (2) coats of paint and don't bother with the paint & primer stuff, learned that here!

Don't know how large your garage but if it's typical (2) car roll it on as
a sprayer will cost more, and if you have not used it alot of learning curve to get it right.

Have fun, take your time and you will be painting the inside of the house before you know it. I love to paint now......it's taken a few years to feel good about the results

user1007 12-02-2012 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinWP (Post 1064767)
  • Do most people use a paint and primer combo?
  • Is using a spray gun advised?
Any help is appreciated for this newbie!

No such thing, but in the brilliant minds of marketing folk, as paint and primer in one.

Spraying comes with a learning curve and a need to mask off EVERYTHING you do not to want have paint bits on. I guess a garage would be a good place to learn? You will have to backroll anyhow. You could probably be done with roller and paint brush in the time it took to mask, set-up, spray, clean-up etc. If you must spray, rent nice equipment and do not buy some box store plastic fantastic toy rig.

KevinWP 12-02-2012 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1064807)
Are the seams taped now and is any of it loose?

If it's taped you are ready to mud it----You will need blades--6"-10" and 12"

Mud----there are three types---powdered light weight easy sand--20-45-90--minute setting time---
used to pack gaps and holes--fill corner bead---often used for the first coat of compound over the tape---
sets fast--very hard--tough to sand.

All Purpose---green lid---contains glue and is used to embed the tape---may use it for all coats---
Hard to sand---but softer than the powdered mix

Light weight--blue lid--topping compound---slow drying---easy to sand---used for final coat.

Apply a fill coat---then apply a topping coat---several vary thin coats are best---feather out the butt joints to 20 or 24 inches---

inside corners about 6 inches.

As to paint---interior is fine---roll it---one primer to seal the paper--then touch ups of the mud job--then a quick over all sanding to knock off any bits of crud that got into the paint.---Then two coats of a good interior paint----

A painter will be along-----Mike----

Thank you! That was pretty much everything I needed to know!

ToolSeeker 12-03-2012 08:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinWP (Post 1064767)
Okay, so after searching, this is what I'm learning. If I'm going to finish up the walls in my garage I need to:
  • Lay down another few lines of tape on the drywall seams.
  • Use a flat colored paint to reduce the inevitable flaws.
  • Use an exterior paint because winters can get below freezing.
I'm sure this job isn't that difficult, I've just never done it. Any other advice?
  • What do you do when the tape just isn't enough? Spackle?
  • Do most people use a paint and primer combo?
  • Is using a spray gun advised?
Any help is appreciated for this newbie!


- Kevin

What do you mean tape isn't enough? Spackle -No
NO NO NO
NO

jeffnc 12-04-2012 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1064938)
No such thing, but in the brilliant minds of marketing folk, as paint and primer in one.

If that's true (and it is from a certain point of view), then it's also true that primer isn't always needed either.

user1007 12-04-2012 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeffnc (Post 1066505)
If that's true (and it is from a certain point of view), then it's also true that primer isn't always needed either.

I have endorsed the idea of primer and paint in one. I believe in self-applying paint too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4jmEwW95Uk

Of course people tire of looking at it but I fully endorse the idea of cold fusiion to power my place too.

Sealer if needed. Primer for sure. Two coats of paint.

Primer and paint do not come in the same can.

user1007 12-04-2012 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeffnc (Post 1066505)
If that's true (and it is from a certain point of view), then it's also true that primer isn't always needed either.

Hugh:eek: Lost your logical path. :eek:

user1007 12-04-2012 11:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeffnc (Post 1066505)
If that's true (and it is from a certain point of view), then it's also true that primer isn't always needed either.

Never suggested a primer was always needed.

Just suggested paint and primer do not and never can come in the same can? :thumbup: It is not just a point of view. It comes from decades of applying primer and paint to surfaces.

jeffnc 12-05-2012 08:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1066567)
Never suggested a primer was always needed.

2 posts above you said "primer for sure".

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1066567)
Just suggested paint and primer do not and never can come in the same can? :thumbup: It is not just a point of view. It comes from decades of applying primer and paint to surfaces.

It is a point of view. In some cases, the paint itself contains all the necessary ingredients for priming certain substrates for certain applications. Paint can be "self priming". Manufacturers can call it whatever they want for marketing purposes. But to the extent that drywall needs to be primed, paint can often be used for that priming. If you call that "primer not needed" or "paint is the primer" or "the primer is in the paint" is practically the very definition of "point of view".

user1007 12-05-2012 09:27 AM

I really do, after the years in the biz, understand that some paints are somewhat self-priming.

Guess I am aged but every time I encountered drywall, it got sealed/primed and then painted.

I painted art gallery walls much of my career. I never found the need but spot prime, always, over patches made to where holes were.

Cramming stain-blocking, sealer, primer and paint in one can is a different claim. It just does not fly.

You just cannot mix a nice oil based alkyd primer into the same can with the gorgeous 100 percent acrylic you should probably put over it. And adding the suggestion of stain blocking shellac?

Sublime to absurd.

Mr. Paint 12-05-2012 01:00 PM

Self-Priming flat wall paint has been around for decades. They are for new surfaces where moisture (Such as kitchens and baths) is not a concern. The exterior ones are generally for rough-cut framing members or T1-11 sidung. There is no magic in them and they are not designed to be used on substrates that would have better performance with an appropriate primer.

Blame a marketing idiot that knows nothing about paint for the "Paint and Primer-in-One! concept.

jeffnc 12-05-2012 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1066747)
You just cannot mix a nice oil based alkyd primer into the same can with the gorgeous 100 percent acrylic you should probably put over it. And adding the suggestion of stain blocking shellac?

Sublime to absurd.

Agreed. Although it would probably be fine technically if you added water based Kilz to latex paint. Might look like a mess though, who knows.


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