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-   -   Fast drying exterior caulking ready to paint same day (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/fast-drying-exterior-caulking-ready-paint-same-day-182128/)

pman6 06-19-2013 04:48 PM

Fast drying exterior caulking ready to paint same day
 
http://www.dap.com/product_details.aspx?product_id=413

Has anyone ever used DAP fast dry caulking?

I bought the more expensive Dynaflex/Ultra 230, and it says it takes a few days before it's ready to paint over.

I don't have that kind of time. I need to sand, caulk the stress cracks, and paint my fascia board in one day.

The DAP fast dry has silicone, so I hope that's enough flexibility for outdoors

chrisn 06-19-2013 05:59 PM

It works OK

Jmayspaint 06-19-2013 06:20 PM

Not the best, but it is rated for outside. I use it a lot when extreme flexibility isn't needed. The more flexible caulks tend to dry slower.

ric knows paint 06-19-2013 08:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pman6 (Post 1204030)
http://www.dap.com/product_details.aspx?product_id=413

Has anyone ever used DAP fast dry caulking?

I bought the more expensive Dynaflex/Ultra 230, and it says it takes a few days before it's ready to paint over.

I don't have that kind of time. I need to sand, caulk the stress cracks, and paint my fascia board in one day.

The DAP fast dry has silicone, so I hope that's enough flexibility for outdoors

I feel the need to answer a question that hasn't been asked. Sorry. The products you've described are more accurately described as "siliconized" as opposed to a silicone caulk. I believe the DynaFlex is an acrylic (siliconized) caulking that, by itself, will provide plenty of flexibility - that's what acrylics do.

Silicone caulks cannot be painted (at least not with conventional coatings by conventional means) and is not compatible with most water soluble components (such as acrylics) - So, how is there siliconized acrylics? It's simple (kind of)...the amount of silicone in acrylic caulks is negligible at most - a fraction of a fraction of a percent. It can't be more than that 'cause the 2 components won't mix. The only reason for the silicone "modification" is...(wait for it)....better, faster adhesion to glass - not flexibility, not water-proofing - adhesion to glass. The problem with caulking around glass with a straight acrylic is acrylics don't do well on surfaces that stay cold or tend to sweat (like glass does in cooler months) - at least not during the application and fragile curing period. Silicone has a much faster tack than acrylics (in that scenario). Silicone won't be horribly affected by either heat nor condensation on glass even during application so that takes away the biggest disadvantage of using acrylics as opposed to oil based caulks (which never worked on windows anyway) or butyl rubber or urethane or some other equally expensive or high tech resin.

It's also important to note that while the amount of silicone in an acrylic caulk is almost immeasurable, the efficacy of these components mixed together only has advantage for about 6 months to 1 year after packaging (that's in the container, once applied to the surface and cured, there is no issue of efficacy).

The simple answer to your question is that a high quality acrylic caulk will provide plenty of flexibility for your project. Silicone, while amazing flexible in it's own right, adds nothing to the overall elasticity of a bead of acrylic caulking.

joecaption 06-19-2013 08:45 PM

I've been using Alex 230 for at least 10 years and have never once waited days to paint it and never once had it fail.
Sure it does not say it takes days for it to fully cure?
I caulk a room and go with back and paint it the same day.

pman6 06-19-2013 09:07 PM

crap. The clear caulking has extra long waiting times.....

http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00010059101.pdf
http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00010057101.pdf

I need to return my clear 230 and get the white.

The data sheet for the clear caulking says "goes on white, takes 1-2 weeks to turn clear. Paint ONLY after turns clear". :furious:

ric knows paint 06-19-2013 09:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pman6 (Post 1204190)
crap. The clear caulking has extra long waiting times.....

http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00010059101.pdf
http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00010057101.pdf

I need to return my clear 230 and get the white.

The data sheet for the clear caulking says "goes on white, takes 1-2 weeks to turn clear. Paint ONLY after turns clear". :furious:

Personally, I don't know why you don't just use Alex Plus, White Lightning, Top Gun or some other time tested acrylic caulks - they work fine for what you're doing and can be painted in a very short time.

jeffnc 06-19-2013 10:13 PM

I've painted over that stuff within a couple hours and never had any issues. Don't put it on so soon that the paint smears the caulk, obviously. Being both water based they can essentially finish drying together.

jeffnc 06-19-2013 10:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pman6 (Post 1204190)
crap. The clear caulking has extra long waiting times.....

http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00010059101.pdf
http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00010057101.pdf

I need to return my clear 230 and get the white.

The data sheet for the clear caulking says "goes on white, takes 1-2 weeks to turn clear. Paint ONLY after turns clear". :furious:

Interesting. I fail to see the point in using a clear caulk and then painting it, but who knows.

KD PAINTING 06-20-2013 07:38 PM

Fast drying exterior caulking ready to paint same day
 
Use it several times and it works well.

Matthewt1970 06-21-2013 12:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ric knows paint (Post 1204157)
I feel the need to answer a question that hasn't been asked. Sorry. The products you've described are more accurately described as "siliconized" as opposed to a silicone caulk. I believe the DynaFlex is an acrylic (siliconized) caulking that, by itself, will provide plenty of flexibility - that's what acrylics do.

Silicone caulks cannot be painted (at least not with conventional coatings by conventional means) and is not compatible with most water soluble components (such as acrylics) - So, how is there siliconized acrylics? It's simple (kind of)...the amount of silicone in acrylic caulks is negligible at most - a fraction of a fraction of a percent. It can't be more than that 'cause the 2 components won't mix. The only reason for the silicone "modification" is...(wait for it)....better, faster adhesion to glass - not flexibility, not water-proofing - adhesion to glass. The problem with caulking around glass with a straight acrylic is acrylics don't do well on surfaces that stay cold or tend to sweat (like glass does in cooler months) - at least not during the application and fragile curing period. Silicone has a much faster tack than acrylics (in that scenario). Silicone won't be horribly affected by either heat nor condensation on glass even during application so that takes away the biggest disadvantage of using acrylics as opposed to oil based caulks (which never worked on windows anyway) or butyl rubber or urethane or some other equally expensive or high tech resin.

It's also important to note that while the amount of silicone in an acrylic caulk is almost immeasurable, the efficacy of these components mixed together only has advantage for about 6 months to 1 year after packaging (that's in the container, once applied to the surface and cured, there is no issue of efficacy).

The simple answer to your question is that a high quality acrylic caulk will provide plenty of flexibility for your project. Silicone, while amazing flexible in it's own right, adds nothing to the overall elasticity of a bead of acrylic caulking.

Silicone II caulk comes in both a paintable and non-paintable formulas.

ric knows paint 06-21-2013 05:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 (Post 1205010)
Silicone II caulk comes in both a paintable and non-paintable formulas.

This following quote is taken directly (copied and pasted) from GE FAQ page regarding paintable Silicone II caulk...

"Which caulks can be painted over?
100 percent silicone is non-paintable. GE Silicone II* Paintable Silicone is a waterproof and paintable caulk that combines the superior benefits of silicone with the paintability of an acrylic."


Marketing can say pretty much anything they want to say...Is it really silicone? It's obviously not 100% silicone - and that's corroborated by GE themselves. If you read their data and sell sheets on these paintable caulks, you can make certain assumptions by both what they do and don't say about the product...

I said earlier that silicone caulking is not paintable by conventional coatings and conventional methods, and it's not - but by saying that, isn't it within the realm of possibility that unconventional coatings and unconventional methods could possibly and successfully paint silicone? If that's somewhat true, shouldn't the reverse be true as well? That using unconventional silicones, or formulations, or perhaps even other types of resins with silicone-like properties be considered paintable? Seems like it to me - so neither of these "hypotheticals" changes, nor disproves, anything I said earlier...

PS - GE is the manufacturer of Silicone II caulking...

Matthewt1970 06-21-2013 06:59 PM

I wouldn't be surprised if it is not 100% silicone. I would be curious to know the exact differences between the 2.

ric knows paint 06-21-2013 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 (Post 1205216)
I wouldn't be surprised if it is not 100% silicone. I would be curious to know the exact differences between the 2.

I would too...All I know for certain is that it's not 100%, GE even says that.


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