Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-13-2008, 12:02 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Exterior Painting Question


Ok, I've decided to paint my house myself. And I have some questions. I will post photos below.

I know the house needs to be pressure washed before I start. And I figured since most of the paint just rubs off by rubbing a hand over it, that pressure washing it would get all but a little off. But the guy that came to give me an estimate said that he wouldn't want to use too much pressure on it, because the wood might "hair-up" meaning, having a shredding effect. and make the painting difficult or possibly make the paint not last as long.

I want to do a good job and don't mind working, but I don't want to waste time scraping the whole thing by hand if I don't "need" to.

What should I do?

Thanks!



jmm8877 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2008, 05:02 PM   #2
Tired, Cold, and Damp
 
slickshift's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,089
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Exterior Painting Question


A good pressure wash would help remove a lot of the questionable paint
True, in the wrong hands it could also do damage

Most certainly you will still need hand scraping and sanding after PWing
But I wouldn't consider tackling this one w/o a good PWIng first to remove as much as possible

slickshift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 05:57 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Exterior Painting Question


Thanks, I think I'm going to just buy a pressure washer and do it my self. The guy that would do it said he could spray his hand from a foot away from the tip of the wand. That doesn't sound like very much pressure to me. What psi would you want to use for something like this?
jmm8877 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 08:05 PM   #4
Tired, Cold, and Damp
 
slickshift's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,089
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Exterior Painting Question


The PSI #s won't help if it's a foot away...the PSI # won't matter
By the same token, getting in too close will a "safe" PSI will still rip a nice cut into your wood

A proper PWer will run you 300+
The under $200 electric ones won't cut the mustard

You should never put your hand in front of a PW stream
slickshift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2008, 11:16 AM   #5
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Exterior Painting Question


By looking at the bare wood, aren't the splits in the wood going to cause a problem? I have noticed that if I do nothing with the splits, due to the expansion and contractions the wood goes through, in time the new paint will start to crack that is going over the splits. It has done the same thing when filled with caulk. The only way I have been able to prevent this has been to epoxy ALL the wood splits. In this way, the cracks will not be opening and closing, thus preventing the paint from cracking over the splits. Am I missing something here?

Bofus
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2008, 01:32 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 551
Rewards Points: 502
Default

Exterior Painting Question


I'm with mosby... that wood looks to be in pretty sad shape. I'd seriously be considering a re-siding job. If it's sound, go for it, but some of that stuff looks to be falling apart.

Also, that stuff looks old... if it is from the lead paint era, it may be a very bad idea to just wail away at it with a pressure washer. You would have to contact your county building department for details as to what you have to do. If you do it wrong, it could become a very expensive mess.

SirWired
sirwired is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2008, 07:21 PM   #7
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Exterior Painting Question


I am doing a complete restoration on my house, and some of the wood siding on my house looks as bad, if not worse than in the photos. I have found that the old wood can be saved, but it takes a lot of work. All of the "pitina" (exposed and weathered wood) must be removed first. I use a small saw-blade on my drill to cut open the splits to good wood. Then, the epoxy will do its job. It may be a huge job, but after its completed, it looks like new siding, with NO SPLITS opening up, causing paint failure. I am sure that it would be a lot quicker to replace the siding, but when you are dealing with an Historical house, you need to save as much of the original as possible.

Bofus
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 12:19 AM   #8
Member
 
Matthewt1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,809
Rewards Points: 1,058
Default

Exterior Painting Question


Power wasing is a good idea, but you are gonna have pint chips everwhere. Being a pro hous painter I would almost rather see the paint in that condition as most of it will just fall right off the house and then you will be getting a fresh primer coat on almost every sare inch. All bare wood should be primed with Oil.
Matthewt1970 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 06:51 AM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 29
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Exterior Painting Question


Looks like you need to get some siding and call it a day.. Even if you do take the time to do all the labor to re paint it, it will be this way again in the future. Good luck you have a huge project on your hands, I would like to see it complete
Demochick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 08:26 AM   #10
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Exterior Painting Question


That brings up another concern. If you have old wood that has been dry for quite some time (paint intact) and you use a pressure-washer to remove the loose paint, when the old wood gets wet, it will expand far more than it has in years, and cause more cracks. I'm not convinced pressure washing is the best option for old wood. If I am wrong in my concerns, please educate me on what the truth really is.

Thank you!

Bofus
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 10:19 AM   #11
Member
 
Matthewt1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,809
Rewards Points: 1,058
Default

Exterior Painting Question


It "could" do that, but wood cracking is more from the wood drying out so I doubt it would do that. After looking at your pics again, and if the whole house is in the same condition, I would say skip the power washer and get a scraper for now and do a section. It looks like a strong breeze will take a lot of the paint off anyways. If you end up takeing 90% of the paint off, then "Spot Priming" ends up becoming a full coat of primer, you have basicly defeated the purpose of a power washing.
Matthewt1970 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 03:18 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 551
Rewards Points: 502
Default

Exterior Painting Question


Color me skeptical about this [trade name deleted] stuff. For a product that has supposedly been in use for thirty years, it sure is awful hard to find any useful information on it. No MSDS, no discussion on the usual DIY or contractor boards, no detailed description as to what it actually is, etc. ("Cross-linked polymer" is about as useful as saying "contains stuff".)

On top of that, the homepage for the product cites it as equivalent to "the 100 mpg caburetor", you know, the mythical beast supressed by the oil industry, etc. Any text even remotely like that sets off my snake-oil alarms.

Claiming that this is some secret the paint companies don't want you to know is complete bunk. Any paint co. CEO would sell their firstborn child for a magic ingredient that would cause paint to last forever. Think of how much they could charge for that kind of paint!

SirWired

Last edited by slickshift; 09-17-2008 at 09:49 PM. Reason: product spam mention edited
sirwired is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 07:36 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Near Philly
Posts: 2,041
Rewards Points: 1,002
Default

Exterior Painting Question


who mentioned [trade name deleted]?

Last edited by slickshift; 09-17-2008 at 09:50 PM. Reason: ditto
bob22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 08:09 PM   #14
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Exterior Painting Question


Yup, I guess I missed that too. Must be a post in the wrong place.
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 08:19 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Near Philly
Posts: 2,041
Rewards Points: 1,002
Default

Exterior Painting Question


I had to look and see about this stuff:
this website
Doesn't look like it would work on painted siding.
Bob


Last edited by slickshift; 09-17-2008 at 09:52 PM. Reason: sorry, really don't want to encourage the spammer
bob22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Basement Renovation Question KUIPORNG Remodeling 234 08-26-2008 09:19 AM
hrv question indep HVAC 3 07-17-2008 11:39 PM
Basement vapor barrier question rob7young Remodeling 2 04-13-2008 10:10 AM
New service Question Onytay Electrical 1 10-24-2007 06:47 AM
One furnace question and one thermostat question lh0628 HVAC 4 10-11-2007 11:17 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.