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Old 04-11-2011, 06:37 AM   #16
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Exterior Paint Behr:


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Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
OP says the sides that face the sun are nearly perfect.
I'm concluding here that OP is "original poster." I thought we were waiting for someone with the initials OP to weight in.

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Wouldn't those sides fail first? The sun would vaporize any moisture in the siding and form blisters. I'm still waiting for OP to tell us if there is any pattern to the failure, or if it's random. Which side of the house OP takes the brunt of wind blown rain?
The prevailing wind along the coast is southeast. The two successful sides face southeast and south. Wind blown rain I would venture to say come in from the northeast (nor-easters) and west. Fronts form to the west and north of us and flow from the midwest or west toward the coast...just think of the typical Canadian fronts that move through the country. These are the sides I would guess take the brunt of weather systems. Also, the back side or Northwest, is where wood softens from moisture and has to be replaced. I have yet to replace wood on the other three sides.

Thanks JS for your persistence and patience here..

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Old 04-11-2011, 10:28 PM   #17
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Exterior Paint Behr:


OP, amongst your weather report and meteorlogical lesson, I think was an answer to my question. So, the failing sides take the brunt of the weather?, and the near perfect sides don't?. Seems to me it's an exterior moisture issue. Now it's a matter of figuring out how the moisture is getting behind your siding, repairing that defect, then repair the paint failure. Once you get all the failed paint off, let the wood dry for a couple of days prior to priming.
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Old 04-12-2011, 06:01 PM   #18
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Exterior Paint Behr:


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Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
OP, amongst your weather report and meteorlogical lesson, I think was an answer to my question. So, the failing sides take the brunt of the weather?, and the near perfect sides don't?. Seems to me it's an exterior moisture issue. Now it's a matter of figuring out how the moisture is getting behind your siding, repairing that defect, then repair the paint failure. Once you get all the failed paint off, let the wood dry for a couple of days prior to priming.
JS

Glad you enjoyed the WX lesson. Your queries set me up for like a big, slow softball pitch and had to take a swing at it.

So, I visited the local SW storefront and was offered a consultation by an SW paint rep. This afternoon he visited and here's a summary of his synopsis...best I can recall and many of those other contributors to this thread suggested similar findings.

His assessment: old oil based paint will persist to be a problem and does not have the give that latex does when moisture gets to the wood. As a result, it pops and cracks. He too banged away at the moisture penetration and that cedar, as a wood, has an affinity for moisture.

The other problems I have, and he stated not uncommon to houses along the coast, where he has consulted on hundreds, is the mildew spores. They attack immediately! Although I've just cleaned and painted, spores have already attacked and begun to hang out on both painted and exposed surfaces. So it is essential that a mildew, spore killing, element is included in the paint. Kilz doesn't have that and therefore is useless on exterior surfaces. Of course, he was very nice the way he presented this information...I'm just cutting to the chase for those that appreciated bottom line correspondence.

The long-term fix: mechanically remove all paint whether it's ground off or sanded but until it is removed the problem will persist. A 60 year-old wood with multiple layers of paint gets heavy and has difficulty adhering to the wood surface. He used some fancier word I don't recall off hand.

Or, short-term fix: This scenario I posed when the long-term fix is passed on. Scrap areas and use an oil based primer followed by an exterior latex paint. This will protect the raw wood surfaces but will not offer the protection where old paint remains layered.

But I'll continue to have this problem as long as old paint remains...regardless of paint selected or level of quality of that particular paint line. So, while an advocate for SW Duration and it is a longevity product, it is subject to the same condition I currently have with my north and northwest sides. There would be no benefit to the investment when the problem will persist until the long-term solution is completed. SW A100 would be as effective as any other SW product in the short-term. I concluded that I would rather fix the problem every few years, now that I understand it than grind off existing layers.

Oh...and by all means, avoid all chemical strippers. They would complicate a fix and would be a near disaster. He's currently working on one of those beach houses where they did a chemical strip and a year later, still having a problem with paint adherence...or something like that.

Questions?
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Old 04-12-2011, 06:51 PM   #19
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Exterior Paint Behr:


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Originally Posted by hunt4cleanair View Post
The two sides away from the sun get mildewed and blister. All sides were powerwashed.

The sides that face the sun (southeast and south) are nearly perfect. Color and sheen hold their own and I would say there are no failures on those two sides.
There's your deal.

Contrary to what those who just LOOK for a reason to bash Behr Paint are claiming, if the problem was the paint you'd have the same problem on all 4 sides.

The problem is that 2 sides of the building were still "wet" when you painted them.

Basically, I refuse to ever again power-wash a building I'm going to paint. It usually does NOT take just a week or two to dry. Sometimes it seems like it takes the whole darned summer.


To be sure, Behr Exterior is not the highest rated paint on the market. Also, you probably should have used oil-based primer for better adhesion.

Last edited by DrHicks; 04-12-2011 at 06:53 PM.
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Old 04-12-2011, 08:28 PM   #20
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OP, as a percent, how much square area is failing? Is it minor or major? I ask because if you fix as fails, it would probably be, as you say, more cost effective to do it piecemeal than wholesale. Moisture, if not from an internal source, does not attack wood through the paint. It enters from a compromised caulking joint, and unseen source like a window track, a place where the paint has failed that grows over time. After you scrape, give the exposed wood some time to dry, even covering it if rain comes in, before you prime. I see so many contractors prime it the following day and trap the moisture that caused the failure to begin with, creating a cycle. On the problem sides, always caulk all wood joins, for reinforcement. Moisture is entering through breaches in your protection system. You have to find and fix em. Spot fixes are an annual spring time chore to prevent minor glitches that develop over the year from becoming full blown cancer. And, always give exposed wood a thorough sanding with 80 grit paper and dust off well before priming.
Good Luck
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Old 04-17-2011, 10:01 AM   #21
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Exterior Paint Behr:


Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
OP, as a percent, how much square area is failing? Is it minor or major?
I would estimate 10-15 percent at the most.

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Moisture is entering through breaches in your protection system. You have to find and fix em.
As I consider what's been shared on this thread, I see patterns and therefore have included a couple of photographs to illustrate. The two problem sides face ENE and NW. The ENE has had no soft wood that has had to be replaced. The NW side has had wood replaced and has other areas that need to be replaced and are essentially at the ends of the peak on both sides. The white blotches are primer.

But its primarily the lower boards that have been problematic. Perhaps I was not as attentive to mildew retardant paints as I should have been, assuming a good power washing was sufficient. But I understand your point...my paint protection system is being breached. Anyway, your insights appreciated.

Northwest

Exterior Paint Behr:-dsc02219.jpg

East Northeast

Exterior Paint Behr:-dsc02220.jpg

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