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Old 06-07-2012, 03:13 PM   #31
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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Originally Posted by svs View Post
Is there a paint or primer that I could cover it with to block the mildewcides? I know nothing about removing paint. Won't removing the paint cause issues too? How do you properly remove this type of paint?
This topic is beginning to spin out of control. SVS, you've gotten a lot of useful advise and info regarding the Valspar warning label. You're safe. Don't remove it - and, if you're satisfied with the finish, don't paint or prime over it for the sake of preventing any harmful exposure. It's not necessary. The label warns of exposure to crystalline silica, not mildewcides, and the crystalline silica is more of a hazard if inhaling sanding dust (from sanding a surface containing crystalline silica) or inhaling the mist caused from overspray...This particular warning is NOT limited to just exterior paints. Many interior paints, especially less expensive, apartment grade paints, have the exact same warnings pasted on their labels.

A well meaning government created "Right to know" legislation years ago that pretty much requires manufacturers to notify the consumer of any component that may have a detrimental effect to one's health, regardless of the probability. Right to know is a great way to protect consumers, but the process has got to the point of being ridiculous - that's why so many of the responders to this post have been having a little fun with the topic - If you were to purchase this same product in a 5 gallon can, you'd see a warning on the side of the plastic bucket warning of this container being a drowning hazard to small children - that's not to say a child will drown in this 5 gallon bucket, it just wouldn't be impossible...Consider the probabilities before taking any knee-jerk actions (Also consider the warning of the child's halloween super-hero costume warning parents that this cape will not enable a child to actually fly...)

The label does not warn agains mildewcides...or it might, I dunno and it doesn't matter. Mildewcides are a regulated poison...they can leach out of paint films...and they could, possibly, cause respiratory issues or allergic reactions, but not necessarily nor probably. Remember, mildewcides were used in interior paints such as Kitchen & Bath paints for years...and, I'm not pretending to be a scientist nor physician, but your primary concern with exposure from mildewcides came from drinking it, not inhaling it.

So, be calm - you have nothing to worry about. Remember that for future painting projects, don't drink the paint and don't sand it just to snort the dust and you're pretty much OK....then re-read JSheridan's post #26.


Last edited by ric knows paint; 06-07-2012 at 06:46 PM.
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Old 06-07-2012, 04:09 PM   #32
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


Use Peelaway 1 its a heavy alkali paste that will melt away the paint and allow you to remove it with out creating dust.
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Old 06-07-2012, 06:22 PM   #33
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


You'll be exposing yourself to more crap by sanding or stripping off the exterior paint in one day than you will be exposed to over a lifetime of having exterior paint on the walls in one room.

Just leave it alone!
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Old 06-07-2012, 06:33 PM   #34
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You'll be exposing yourself to more crap by sanding or stripping off the exterior paint in one day than you will be exposed to over a lifetime of having exterior paint on the walls in one room.

Just leave it alone!
Well said, Pucks...

the following is the health warning from the Peel Away 1 MSDS sheet...

"EMERGENCY OVERVIEW
DANGER! CORROSIVE!
This product is a white paste with no odor. Direct contact with the eyes may cause severe burns with possible corneal damage and blindness. Skin contact may cause chemical burns. May cause dermatitis if exposure is prolonged. Vapors or mists may cause irritation to the eyes, mucous membranes and respiratory tract. Ingestion may cause gastrointestinal corrosion, vomiting, diarrhea, shock or death."

All chemical products contain such warnings...
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Old 06-07-2012, 08:37 PM   #35
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


If you breathe in the mildewcides, won't that kill the mildew we all breathe in everyday? And anyway I always thought that mildewcides were heavy metals. How do they vaporize and gas off. I'm going to go out on a limb and challenge the assertion that mildewcides become airborne with increasing humidity.
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Old 06-07-2012, 10:07 PM   #36
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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If you breathe in the mildewcides, won't that kill the mildew we all breathe in everyday? And anyway I always thought that mildewcides were heavy metals. How do they vaporize and gas off. I'm going to go out on a limb and challenge the assertion that mildewcides become airborne with increasing humidity.
I'm pretty sure you're right, Joe - I don't think mildewcides actually goes airborne anytime after the host product has been applied...and I really don't know how integral a part of the coating mildewcides actually are (especially the stir-in type). I do know that, if not integral, they are very near the surface of the film and can be rendered in-effective (at least temporarily) by a strong detergent wash.

All that being said and speculated, I hope we've convinced SVS that health concerns with this particular application is largely un-warranted.
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Old 06-08-2012, 02:46 AM   #37
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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Originally Posted by ric knows paint View Post
This topic is beginning to spin out of control. SVS, you've gotten a lot of useful advise and info regarding the Valspar warning label. You're safe. Don't remove it - and, if you're satisfied with the finish, don't paint or prime over it for the sake of preventing any harmful exposure. It's not necessary. The label warns of exposure to crystalline silica, not mildewcides, and the crystalline silica is more of a hazard if inhaling sanding dust (from sanding a surface containing crystalline silica) or inhaling the mist caused from overspray...This particular warning is NOT limited to just exterior paints. Many interior paints, especially less expensive, apartment grade paints, have the exact same warnings pasted on their labels.

A well meaning government created "Right to know" legislation years ago that pretty much requires manufacturers to notify the consumer of any component that may have a detrimental effect to one's health, regardless of the probability. Right to know is a great way to protect consumers, but the process has got to the point of being ridiculous - that's why so many of the responders to this post have been having a little fun with the topic - If you were to purchase this same product in a 5 gallon can, you'd see a warning on the side of the plastic bucket warning of this container being a drowning hazard to small children - that's not to say a child will drown in this 5 gallon bucket, it just wouldn't be impossible...Consider the probabilities before taking any knee-jerk actions (Also consider the warning of the child's halloween super-hero costume warning parents that this cape will not enable a child to actually fly...)

The label does not warn agains mildewcides...or it might, I dunno and it doesn't matter. Mildewcides are a regulated poison...they can leach out of paint films...and they could, possibly, cause respiratory issues or allergic reactions, but not necessarily nor probably. Remember, mildewcides were used in interior paints such as Kitchen & Bath paints for years...and, I'm not pretending to be a scientist nor physician, but your primary concern with exposure from mildewcides came from drinking it, not inhaling it.

So, be calm - you have nothing to worry about. Remember that for future painting projects, don't drink the paint and don't sand it just to snort the dust and you're pretty much OK....then re-read JSheridan's post #26.


beginning???
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Old 06-08-2012, 05:20 AM   #38
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


I don't think the thread is spinning out of control, as it is only a commentary on a real world phenomenon; the out of control hysteria created by special interest groups, an overreaching nanny state government, and out of control people who spend their lives worrying about every little boogeyman lurking in the shadows of life, mostly for nothing and to no benefit. What the whole hysterical mess leads to is increased costs and aggravation, busybodies inserting themselves into everyone else's lives, and less fun. I don't worry about that which they warn us about, I worry about them and what they're doing; to our liberty and our psyche as a nation. This stuff is all ginned up by moneyed interests who benefit financially and those who seek to protect themselves from the consequences of the hysteria, such as the bucket manufacturer who has to spend money on labeling, spend money on insurance liability, and generally worry about the accusations of fault should a child accidentally drown in one of his products. In what world is that the responsibility of the bucket manufacturer? How about the parents? The one I like best is the warning not to use a hair dryer in the shower. Hey, if one of your brainchildren is saving time in the morning by drying your hair and rinsing off simultaneously then maybe you're not a qualified contributor to the gene pool. Yet, some sophisiticated lawyer will find some fault with that particular warning label, whatever it may be, all in an effort to relieve the particular Einstein of personal responsibility. The lawyers aren't concerned about Einstein, they're scouring the landscape specifically to confiscate the fruits created by someone else's toil, namely the hair dryer manufacturer, its inventor, the guy on the production line, and the guy who runs the hot dog cart on the corner outside the plant. You laugh, don't. The whole cast of characters work hand in glove to deceive, manipulate, and exploit the hysterical consumer, that is after they have relieved them of personal responsibility and have them believing they themselves have none. What is now spelled out in paragraphs of fine print used to covered by the placement of the skull and crossbones on the label. I think we were smarter then, or at least less gullible.
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Old 06-08-2012, 06:24 AM   #39
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Paragraphs, Joe. Use Dem.
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Old 06-08-2012, 03:23 PM   #40
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


I appreciate all of the comments. I do find it interesting that some read all of the comments, then only participated by complaining about it.

All of you have made great points, as for the comment regarding the mildewcide... there's no warning label mentioning it. It would be weird for them to put one on the disclaimer and not the other if they both posed a problem.

Last edited by svs; 06-08-2012 at 03:26 PM.
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Old 06-08-2012, 05:26 PM   #41
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
I don't think the thread is spinning out of control, as it is only a commentary on a real world phenomenon; the out of control hysteria created by special interest groups, an overreaching nanny state government, and out of control people who spend their lives worrying about every little boogeyman lurking in the shadows of life, mostly for nothing and to no benefit. What the whole hysterical mess leads to is increased costs and aggravation, busybodies inserting themselves into everyone else's lives, and less fun. I don't worry about that which they warn us about, I worry about them and what they're doing; to our liberty and our psyche as a nation. This stuff is all ginned up by moneyed interests who benefit financially and those who seek to protect themselves from the consequences of the hysteria, such as the bucket manufacturer who has to spend money on labeling, spend money on insurance liability, and generally worry about the accusations of fault should a child accidentally drown in one of his products. In what world is that the responsibility of the bucket manufacturer? How about the parents? The one I like best is the warning not to use a hair dryer in the shower. Hey, if one of your brainchildren is saving time in the morning by drying your hair and rinsing off simultaneously then maybe you're not a qualified contributor to the gene pool. Yet, some sophisiticated lawyer will find some fault with that particular warning label, whatever it may be, all in an effort to relieve the particular Einstein of personal responsibility. The lawyers aren't concerned about Einstein, they're scouring the landscape specifically to confiscate the fruits created by someone else's toil, namely the hair dryer manufacturer, its inventor, the guy on the production line, and the guy who runs the hot dog cart on the corner outside the plant. You laugh, don't. The whole cast of characters work hand in glove to deceive, manipulate, and exploit the hysterical consumer, that is after they have relieved them of personal responsibility and have them believing they themselves have none. What is now spelled out in paragraphs of fine print used to covered by the placement of the skull and crossbones on the label. I think we were smarter then, or at least less gullible.

I'll buy all that except the hot dog guy. What did he do?
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Old 06-08-2012, 06:17 PM   #42
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


A bit of poetic license, kind of like the kitchen sink. The hot dog guy represents the large number of people who were tangential to the asbestos industry that were named in the suits. They were naming anyone who had even the most remote connection and hoping it could stick. Similarly, after they sued for all of the direct workers they started to sue in the name of those who regularly came into contact with the workers, like the wives who washed the workers clothes, their kids, the guy with the hot dog stand on the corner, etc. This has implications for the new lead regime as well. They're looking for liability, and establishing a liability chain was one of the goals of the new regulations. The paint companies are already fighting being raped in court, just like tobacco companies, the gun manufacturers, even the companies that make matches. The match companies are being sued by states and municipalities to recoup the costs of fighting fires attributable to matches, as well as cigarettes and those companies, again. The gun companies are being sued to recoup the costs of cleaning up shooting scenes and the investigative costs.
They're going to start with the paint companies and work their way down the chain to the painters, and the guy they buy their lunch from. Then you're going to be sued by your workers, incited by lawyers, because they're going to start showing lead in their blood. This is what they do. They create hysteria and turn it into a cash cow, but the victims get little to no compensation. It all goes to the lawyers and the government. I purposely did not certify for lead, because I will not be a link in the liability chain. Sponge off someone else. But, I do not do lead work. And, the price of painting is going up, up, up.
I know all this stuff is a bit off topic, but at the same time I don't believe it to be. We're here talking about paint, and what the government is doing to paint and its incidentals is affecting us all, pros and HO's alike. What better audience or venue, I say.

Sorry about the lack p'graphs brush. I was starting to get good at it, remembering it anyway.
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Old 06-09-2012, 04:06 AM   #43
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


I was actually being a smart *ss with my hot dog guy comment, but you're un paragraphed response explained it well
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Old 06-09-2012, 05:41 AM   #44
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I was actually being a smart *ss with my hot dog guy comment, but you're un paragraphed response explained it well
smart *ss, you, nah
Guess I better work harder on my paragraphs
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:01 AM   #45
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


[quote=ric knows paint;938445]This topic is beginning to spin out of control. SVS, you've gotten a lot of useful advise and info regarding the Valspar warning label. You're safe. Don't remove it - and, if you're satisfied with the finish, don't paint or prime over it for the sake of preventing any harmful exposure. It's not necessary. The label warns of exposure to crystalline silica, not mildewcides, and the crystalline silica is more of a hazard if inhaling sanding dust (from sanding a surface containing crystalline silica) or inhaling the mist caused from overspray...This particular warning is NOT limited to just exterior paints. Many interior paints, especially less expensive, apartment grade paints, have the exact same warnings pasted on their labels.

A well meaning government created "Right to know" legislation years ago that pretty much requires manufacturers to notify the consumer of any component that may have a detrimental effect to one's health, regardless of the probability. Right to know is a great way to protect consumers, but the process has got to the point of being ridiculous - that's why so many of the responders to this post have been having a little fun with the topic - If you were to purchase this same product in a 5 gallon can, you'd see a warning on the side of the plastic bucket warning of this container being a drowning hazard to small children - that's not to say a child will drown in this 5 gallon bucket, it just wouldn't be impossible...Consider the probabilities before taking any knee-jerk actions (Also consider the warning of the child's halloween super-hero costume warning parents that this cape will not enable a child to actually fly...)
WELL THAT SUCKS....I THOUGHT THAT MY NEW OUTFIT WITH THE COWBOY HAT & BOOTS, TASSLES AND CLEAR SPEEDOS WITH A CAPE WAS A SURE WAY TO SAVE MONEY VS. BUYING PLANE TICKETS. YOU RUIN EVERYTHING WITH YOUR LOGIC.

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