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Old 06-04-2012, 12:04 PM   #16
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


if you lived in the sunshine year round you would be cautious also they keep it nice cause they care .ever pull off an exit ramp in Brooklyn,New York one big dump,throw a coffee container top out on the I-405 in L.A. it's a moving violation

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Old 06-04-2012, 12:47 PM   #17
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Thanks everyone!
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Old 06-04-2012, 02:27 PM   #18
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Crystalline silica is powder from minerals ground up for pigments. It is less than a tenth of a percent of the solution, yet it is required to be labeled this way in CA. It is NOT lead. When the water evaporate out of latex paints, this substance is incorporated into the paint. Exterior paints used inside have two drawbacks: flexibility (more flexible than interiors), and that there is mildewcide (different from mildewcides in exterior paints).
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Old 06-04-2012, 05:22 PM   #19
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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How can labeling as to known and scientifically proven cancer risk be considered irrelevant? And if carcinogens can be identified and contact avoided is that really tree hugger nonsense or just common sense?

I don't like much about California but living there for decades had its moments. I am rather proud that it does have such an aggressive stance on labeling things. And like it or not, as goes California with such things so goes the nation---eventually.
So true SDS, so true. And California is doing a slow swirl down the crapper, and it's going to take the rest of us with it if they don't get their act together. They're clueless, pie in the sky, and bankrupt. If the world's fifth largest economy tanks, it's going to be a real damper on the first largest.
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:25 PM   #20
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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How can labeling as to known and scientifically proven cancer risk be considered irrelevant? And if carcinogens can be identified and contact avoided is that really tree hugger nonsense or just common sense?

I don't like much about California but living there for decades had its moments. I am rather proud that it does have such an aggressive stance on labeling things. And like it or not, as goes California with such things so goes the nation---eventually.
Maybe you're talking about another post? I never said anything about tree-hugger nonsense (at least, not in this thread, and not in this context).
I was thinking more along the lines of "the little boy who cried wolf", in that there are just so many things labeled these days that "the State of California" telling me that it causes cancer that I just ignore it.

Additionally, they never tell you which ingredient they're talking about. They also don't disclose how they decided it causes cancer, nor in what species it causes cancer. It could be that they found it causes cancer in rats who were fed an ingredient at 1000 times the amount a human would typically inhale the fumes from same ingredient over the course of a lifetime.

If you like these specific labels, I don't have an issue with that, I just think they're so prevalent that they've become irrelevant. I'm pretty sure you read too far between the lines of my initial reply though.
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Old 06-05-2012, 10:50 AM   #21
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


Chrystalline silica is essentially sand and the main danger is from inhaling it. I think the warning label applies more to grinding a dried product than applying the wet product. The way it affects the body is more similar (but not at all the same) to asbestos than lead.
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Old 06-05-2012, 11:27 AM   #22
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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Originally Posted by Windows
Chrystalline silica is essentially sand and the main danger is from inhaling it. I think the warning label applies more to grinding a dried product than applying the wet product. The way it affects the body is more similar (but not at all the same) to asbestos than lead.
So since I'll never sand the dried product it should be ok? This built in will basically just hold books and a tv. There are cabinets that are the bottom but I can't see the use of those cabinets causing dust or grinding.
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Old 06-05-2012, 12:37 PM   #23
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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So since I'll never sand the dried product it should be ok? This built in will basically just hold books and a tv. There are cabinets that are the bottom but I can't see the use of those cabinets causing dust or grinding.
You will be fine. Those warnings are more for people that have an occupational exposure to chrystalline silica. It is present in many construction materials and for people who sand and grind all day, there may be some degree of risk. THe problem is, the long term affects are not well understood. But the same can be said for a lot of products when they were new. When radioactivity was first identified, radioactive ingredients were added to consumer products such as toothpaste because it was believed they promoted robust health. People didn't know any better. Same idea with c.s., but the jury is still out. In 40 years we will know a lot more about the degree of risk to health posed by c.s. in paint (if any), and until that time, we get a warning label.
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Old 06-05-2012, 03:48 PM   #24
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


Good luck finding any paint without that warning now that titanium dioxide is listed as "possibly carcinogenic".
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Old 06-05-2012, 10:22 PM   #25
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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So since I'll never sand the dried product it should be ok? This built in will basically just hold books and a tv. There are cabinets that are the bottom but I can't see the use of those cabinets causing dust or grinding.
Even if you needed to sand it to put on another coat, there's not much to worry about. If you're sanding anything indoors (or anywhere without good ventilation), you should wear a dust mask. As someone already stated, the risk for this is long-term, and mostly for construction workers, drillers, stone blasters, etc. You are not at any more risk today than you were the day before you applied this paint.

Breathing in solids of any kind is bad for you, and worse for you over the long-term. There is little risk of intermittent or short-term exposures to most of the items on California's Proposition 65 list. The point of the list is let you know that long-term ingestion of, or inhalation exposure to, the items can cause health problems. Ironically, they state that chemotherapy drugs treating a cancer (lymphoma) can cause cancer.

California Proposition 65 List:
http://oehha.ca.gov/prop65/prop65_li...ngle031612.pdf

And, here's a link to OSHA's stance on crystalline silica:
http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_Gene...-factsheet.pdf
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Old 06-06-2012, 06:28 AM   #26
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


This is how we drive ourselves nuts. CS may possibly cause cancer in some people, possibly, if they're exposed to amounts that would kill an elephant. When the whole asbestos hysteria flared up, they told us that one speck of it could cause asbestosis. My father worked for years in industrial conditions, with smokestacks, where it was removed and installed regularly. He said it would like it was snowing in there. This was before we "knew" it was bad. He just turned 74, and he still gets checked every year by the utility company he worked for, nothing. So much for a speck, huh. This isn't to discount or belittle those who contracted asbestosis, not at all. But there are always going to be things that are harmful in life. There are going to be things that we're told are harmful that turn out not to be, and things that are that we're told aren't. Eradicating every little risk or danger in life is a futile fool's errand, yet we drive ourselves nut chasing them down and living in fear of those we can't identify. We're not contemplating foot baths in cannisters of Uranium 235 here. We're talking about what amounts to handful of powder locked in a dry, hardened latex. As society and technology marches forward, we all enjoy the benefits of it, but there are unfortunately going to be negative effects for some of us, but not the majority. That's life. Danger lurks around every corner in the natural and unnatural world. Heck, even the sun can kill you if you get too much of it. What should we do about that? Put on some suntan lotion. Now they're thinking that some of the elements in some lotions, in combination with UV, are actually what is causing skin cancer. Drive yourself nuts on that one.
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Old 06-06-2012, 06:52 AM   #27
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
This is how we drive ourselves nuts. CS may possibly cause cancer in some people, possibly, if they're exposed to amounts that would kill an elephant. When the whole asbestos hysteria flared up, they told us that one speck of it could cause asbestosis. My father worked for years in industrial conditions, with smokestacks, where it was removed and installed regularly. He said it would like it was snowing in there. This was before we "knew" it was bad. He just turned 74, and he still gets checked every year by the utility company he worked for, nothing. So much for a speck, huh. This isn't to discount or belittle those who contracted asbestosis, not at all. But there are always going to be things that are harmful in life. There are going to be things that we're told are harmful that turn out not to be, and things that are that we're told aren't. Eradicating every little risk or danger in life is a futile fool's errand, yet we drive ourselves nut chasing them down and living in fear of those we can't identify. We're not contemplating foot baths in cannisters of Uranium 235 here. We're talking about what amounts to handful of powder locked in a dry, hardened latex. As society and technology marches forward, we all enjoy the benefits of it, but there are unfortunately going to be negative effects for some of us, but not the majority. That's life. Danger lurks around every corner in the natural and unnatural world. Heck, even the sun can kill you if you get too much of it. What should we do about that? Put on some suntan lotion. Now they're thinking that some of the elements in some lotions, in combination with UV, are actually what is causing skin cancer. Drive yourself nuts on that one.
(true) CBS news has reported a man "caught on fire after applying sun-tan lotion..." Great! Now I have that to worry about.

About all the other hysteria warnings, it's like George Carlin once said -
"Saliva has now been found to be harmful to one's health...but only if taken in small doses over long periods of time..."


Last edited by ric knows paint; 06-06-2012 at 08:21 AM.
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Old 06-06-2012, 04:40 PM   #28
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Exterior paint accidently used indoors


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(true) CBS news has reported a man "caught on fire after applying sun-tan lotion..." Great! Now I have that to worry about.


About all the other hysteria warnings, it's like George Carlin once said -
"Saliva has now been found to be harmful to one's health...but only if taken in small doses over long periods of time..."


if it's not one thing it's another, people should worry about important things
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Old 06-07-2012, 02:03 PM   #29
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SVS,
Exterior paint should not be used inside as it contains mildewcides that are released as humidity increases. These mildewcides are toxic and can cause respitory problems, especially if you are predisposed to such illneses. Before anyone other people add their two bits about this and say "oh its just paint and its fine" I have worked for one of the largest paint compaines in the world for the better part of a decade and have seen first hand what happenes when people ignore the warnings.
I would suggest removing the paint, repriming and repainting with a high quality interior latex paint. If you know there is no lead on the built in sand the paint off...if you're concerned that there may be lead use a stripper such as peelaway 1.

Good luck.
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Old 06-07-2012, 02:29 PM   #30
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SVS,
Exterior paint should not be used inside as it contains mildewcides that are released as humidity increases. These mildewcides are toxic and can cause respitory problems, especially if you are predisposed to such illneses. Before anyone other people add their two bits about this and say "oh its just paint and its fine" I have worked for one of the largest paint compaines in the world for the better part of a decade and have seen first hand what happenes when people ignore the warnings.
I would suggest removing the paint, repriming and repainting with a high quality interior latex paint. If you know there is no lead on the built in sand the paint off...if you're concerned that there may be lead use a stripper such as peelaway 1.

Good luck.

Is there a paint or primer that I could cover it with to block the mildewcides? I know nothing about removing paint. Won't removing the paint cause issues too? How do you properly remove this type of paint?

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