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Old 01-17-2014, 05:32 PM   #61
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Do you ENJOY cutting in?


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Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
First of all, his terminology is kind of typical of someone who doesn't pay attention to detail. One of the first things he says is "I'm using a Purdy 4" nap". Now that's obviously ridiculous and something an amateur might say. It's called a roller cover, not a "nap". The nap is the fiber length, not the roller cover length. There never has been and never will be a 4" nap.

Next, I don't like how he's holding his brush, and not exactly how most pros would do it. You want your brush going lengthwise, to get the most amount of paint going in that direction. The technique he shows at 8:10 is more like it. But I don't like that particular Purdy brush because it's too narrow (not the width, but the thickness.) (A lot of people hear that Purdy brushes are good, but the problem is a lot of the Purdy brushes are too thin, and people don't learn good technique from them. To get enough paint on the wall they intuitively turn the brush the wrong way. They are fine brushes but only best for cutting in if you buy the thicker models, which are less common in stores. Most of the Wooster brushes are thicker.

As far as using a 4" roller to begin with for cutting in, it does have some advantages, but you can get closer with your large roller than most people seem to think, so I don't usually bother. One time I will use that technique is when I'm painting a high ceiling, like 16'. It's too difficult to judge how close I can get to the ceiling when I'm standing on the floor, so I will use the 4" roller when I'm up on the ladder cutting in.

He's basically just taking too long to cut in, he'll take 4 hours to paint that room.

This is a fast cut in with brush angled correctly

2 pass method


This guy is using a 4" brush (also explains 2 pass)

at least

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Old 01-17-2014, 06:15 PM   #62
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Do you ENJOY cutting in?


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This guy is using a 4" brush (also explains 2 pass)
And there you go. Nice upload Chris... And this is how I cut. Same way.
See, people, it's not that uncommon and it works good with practice.
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Old 01-18-2014, 03:05 AM   #63
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Do you ENJOY cutting in?


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And there you go. Nice upload Chris... And this is how I cut. Same way.
See, people, it's not that uncommon and it works good with practice.

not me
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Old 01-18-2014, 09:52 AM   #64
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Do you ENJOY cutting in?


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This guy is using a 4" brush (also explains 2 pass)
By the way, this guy makes an interesting point about using a straight brush instead of an angled brush, at 1:45. Usually called a wall brush - the brush I use for a lot of cutting in is the Wooster Alpha 3" Wall, 7/8" thick, deep well. Brush size of 3" and up is great if you paint a lot but I think the hands of an occasional DIYer might get pretty tired with the extra weight.

http://www.woosterbrush.com/Catalog/...alBrushes/Wall
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Old 01-18-2014, 01:43 PM   #65
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Do you ENJOY cutting in?


Nothing says they can't be used for cutting in. When we do dorms or the housing projects where everything gets the same paint they really make quick work of things but most people whine about 4" brushes being too heavy. When you come to a corner where you can't get any paint on the opposing surface then they are a PITA.
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Old 01-29-2014, 06:50 PM   #66
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Do you ENJOY cutting in?


Interesting. So what do you do when painting the trim is part of the job? I'd be nervous doing that over trim paint that just finished drying, even if using the delicate tape.

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No.

Well, sort of. I use a tape dispenser, 3M TA20. The cutting in I really hate is along the baseboard. But roll out tape along the little top edge of the baseboard with my tape dispenser, and it keeps the tape tight right up against the wall. Then 2 coats with a dryish brush and voila - perfect line. Once the tape is on and as I said using a dryish brush, you can go super fast with this technique. Fast like 5 minutes around a whole bedroom per coat. (I need 2 coats even if I'm getting away with 1 on the walls. If I need 2 coats, then I do 3 coats along the baseboard because of the thinner paint film I'm putting on.) I got this tip from Jack Pauhl and it works great.

http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2009/12/3m-ta20-hand-masker-video-on-casings.html
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Old 01-29-2014, 10:22 PM   #67
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Interesting. So what do you do when painting the trim is part of the job? I'd be nervous doing that over trim paint that just finished drying, even if using the delicate tape.
If you're painting the trim too, then it's not a problem. The idea is to get a clean line between wall and trim, any way you can. At the baseboard, gravity is working against you when you're painting the wall, pulling the paint down. But that assumes you're not painting the baseboard. If I were painting the baseboard too, I'd paint the wall first, doing a sloppy job against the baseboard. Then I'd paint the baseboard last, where it's fairly easy to get a clean line without tape. Your brush just follows the top edge of the baseboard to give you the line.

When painting an entire room, I'd paint the ceiling first (doing a sloppy job at the wall edges), then the window and wall trim (doing a sloppy job against the wall), then the walls (doing a clean edge against the ceiling and trim, but a sloppy edge against the baseboard), and the baseboard trim last, doing a clean edge against the wall.

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