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Old 06-07-2013, 06:32 AM   #16
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Deck Staining


Quote:
Originally Posted by GanJa

Can i use a cleaner like this: http://www.homedepot.ca/product/thom...cleaner/902907. Any proper washing method you recommend? Also dont i have to wash the deck after sanding as well? Is staining the deck enough? do i need to apply any kind of sealant ?
The Thompsons cleaner would probably be ok to use, but it is specificity for use in prep for penetrating sealers/ waterproofers. Doesn't say anything about prep for solid stain.
An all purpose cleaner like TSP would be better,cheaper, and safer IMO.

http://www.ehow.com/how_7604088_clean-deck-tsp.html

This is a simple, fail safe method for washing a deck.
If you wash then sand, you do not have to wash again after sanding. Just use a shop vac and/or a leaf blower to remove sanding dust, and your ready to stain. It can actually be hard to remove sanding dust with water, you can end up forcing more dust into the grain/cracks of the wood.
I don't think there's anything technically wrong with washing after sanding, but I would still blow the dust off first.

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Old 06-07-2013, 07:08 AM   #17
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Deck Staining


Quote:
Originally Posted by GanJa
Also guys i found this old bucket of paint in my garage heres how it looks like from outside:
http://imageshack.us/a/img203/4236/photo6sc.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img845/2719/photo5jij.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img39/9329/photo4xu.jpg
http://img801.imageshack.us/img801/7097/photovkp.jpg

When i opened it. It had a hard layer on the top and when i popped it it was all oily. I was expecting it to be a grey paint that i have right now on my deck. So what is this ? Is this useable?

Also when painting is better to use a brush or long-handled paint roller?

Also wht kind of sanding machine you guys recommend? A orbital sander like this: or something like this:
The old stain you found is not rated for use on decks. And if it was skinned over on top, some of the solids have dried out. It's garbage now, but good to know what it is your going over.

I'm not sure why the guy in the first video is calling that an 'orbital sander. Orbitals spin or 'orbit' that machine is more like a vibrating sander. Machines like that can be useful if your deck is very level, with little or no cupping of the boards and no exposed nail heads. Notice in the video he is sanding a mahogany deck, lot different than yours.
The safest effective way I've found to sand is with just a regular random orbital sander with 60 grit paper.

http://www.toolup.com/dewalt_d26450_...d=scsho1071915

It is slow and labor intensive. Depending on conditions, one of my helpers can sand between 100 and 200 square feet a day with one.

A disc sander is easily twice as fast, but more difficult/dangerous to use.

http://www.factoryauthorizedoutlet.c...-w-dust-shroud

Using a belt sander across the grain like in the second video, doesn't seem like any kind of a good idea to me. Cross grain sanding is a general 'no no'

The old stain is oil based. Keep that in mind when choosing a new product. I really like ZAR oil modified solid ext. stain for applications like yours. It has binders that promote adhesion on previously stained/painted surfaces (the pickets) and is performing better for me on deck floors than any latex stain.

Use a brush to better work the material into the grain.
http://www.twpstain.com/wooster-6-pro-stain-brush

All together, restoring a deck to where it will last a few years is a LOT of work. Good luck, let us know how it goes.
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Old 06-07-2013, 03:31 PM   #18
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Deck Staining


thx for replying but as you can see on that old paint box that i found it says its good on wood fences.

Also that thompson one says it does remove semi-transparent stains

what you mean by cross grain sanding? Is there a video that you knw that shows how to properly sand?

Also most of the videos i have watched nobody is painting their spindles or doing any prep on them. Why is that? Do i not have to repaint the spindles?

Last edited by GanJa; 06-07-2013 at 03:33 PM.
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Old 06-07-2013, 05:07 PM   #19
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Deck Staining


Quote:
Originally Posted by GanJa
thx for replying but as you can see on that old paint box that i found it says its good on wood fences.

Also that thompson one says it does remove semi-transparent stains

what you mean by cross grain sanding? Is there a video that you knw that shows how to properly sand?

Also most of the videos i have watched nobody is painting their spindles or doing any prep on them. Why is that? Do i not have to repaint the spindles?
Yes, the stain can does say its good for fences. That's why it still looks ok on the 'spindles ( or pickets)
Product labels are often worded to present the best aspects of the product. Of topic a min but, look at the labels on 100% silicone caulk. It will almost never say "not paintable" but it isn't. As many have found out with great regret.
Similarly, if a stain doesn't specifically say its made for horizontal surfaces (decks) its probably not. A stain made for deck floors will say so on the label.
Also the Thompsons wash says " removes worn semi-trans and sealers". What's on your deck is a solid stain. If the Thompsons has chems to remove solid film forming coatings, then the deck would probably have to be neutralized after using the wash,(and be quite caustic) and it didn't say anything about that on the Thompsons (although I didn't see a spec sheet)
I suspect a lot of deck cleaners (and even scrubbing alone) would remove 'weathered semi-trans, but not have the strong chems needed to break down solids.

If the pickets look ok still, you don't have to do them at all. Or if they are not peeling, you won't necessarily have to sand them if you do stain.
If you do coat them, check for chalking. Old oil stains like in your pic have a tendency to get 'chalky'. Run your hand over some and see if a chalky substance comes off on your hand. If so it must be dealt with.

Look for video of 'sanding a deck with a random orbital sander.
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Old 11-18-2013, 06:11 AM   #20
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Deck Staining


You can find staining tips here: http://www.stormsystem.com/wood-staining-tips. You will definitely need to remove the old products from the surface of the wood, or else the new deck stain will not be able to take hold.
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Old 02-11-2014, 01:47 AM   #21
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Deck Staining


Well, A properly stained deck requires little maintenance. Remember to regularly sweep off leaves and debris since they trap moisture on the deck surface and routinely hose and sweep off pollen and dirt...

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