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Old 06-01-2013, 12:59 PM   #1
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Deck Staining


Hey everyone I recently ( oct 2012) got new stairs done on my deck. Since the wood was pressure treated I was told to wait until summer to stain it. So right now am planning to stain the stairs now as u can see the other portion of my deck requires re-staining too. So what steps should I go thru to re-stain the rest of my deck? Do I need to remove the old paint? Or just wash it ? What products can I use to wash it? I have heard about “Deck wash” from homedepot by Thompson how is that product?
Thx

Please see these links for pics of the deck

http://imageshack.us/a/img845/9885/photo2rmtd.jpg
http://img35.imageshack.us/img35/5934/photoewb.jpg
http://img819.imageshack.us/img819/6747/photo1ebp.jpg

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Last edited by GanJa; 06-01-2013 at 01:04 PM.
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Old 06-01-2013, 01:11 PM   #2
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Deck Staining


That sure looks like old latex stain the way it is peeling. If it were me I would go after it with a palm sander and some 36 or 40 grit sand paper. That will make quick work of getting that old stain off the deck. Now you can skip the deck cleaner. Then I would get a nice semi-transparent or semi-solid oil stain for the deck boards and a solid latex stain for the spindles.

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Old 06-01-2013, 03:09 PM   #3
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Deck Staining


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Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
That sure looks like old latex stain the way it is peeling. If it were me I would go after it with a palm sander and some 36 or 40 grit sand paper. That will make quick work of getting that old stain off the deck. Now you can skip the deck cleaner. Then I would get a nice semi-transparent or semi-solid oil stain for the deck boards and a solid latex stain for the spindles.
Couple questions:
Why do i need to sand the old paint? Cant i paint over it?
Also After sanding i still need to wash the deck right? So is that thompson product okay to use?
Why do i need to use a different type of paint on the spindles? What is the difference between semi-solid oil stain and solid latex stain?

Thx
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Old 06-01-2013, 03:22 PM   #4
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Deck Staining


The problem is that old latex will continue to peel and take any new stain you put over it with it. Horizontal walking surfaces do not hold latex stain worth a darn. The spindels will be ok at holding latex stain, they are verticle where water does not pool on them and they are not walked on. If you sand you can skip the cleaner as you will now essentially have a new clean surface. Semi-solid and semi-transparent stains show some of the wood grain below and are much better for walking surfaces. Oil stain will slowly wear away over time where latex won't and starts to peel. Once an oil stain wears away to a certain point you can just apply new stain over it.
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Old 06-01-2013, 04:05 PM   #5
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Deck Staining


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Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
The problem is that old latex will continue to peel and take any new stain you put over it with it. Horizontal walking surfaces do not hold latex stain worth a darn. The spindels will be ok at holding latex stain, they are verticle where water does not pool on them and they are not walked on. If you sand you can skip the cleaner as you will now essentially have a new clean surface. Semi-solid and semi-transparent stains show some of the wood grain below and are much better for walking surfaces. Oil stain will slowly wear away over time where latex won't and starts to peel. Once an oil stain wears away to a certain point you can just apply new stain over it.
Can i also apply oil stain on the spindles? Also instead of sanding can i just use this cleaner as its easier to apply to remove old paint: http://www.homedepot.ca/product/thom...cleaner/902907
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Old 06-01-2013, 04:22 PM   #6
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You can try the cleaner but it won't remove the old stain very well and you will probably have to resort to sanding. Putting an oil stain over latex stain is not recommended.
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Old 06-01-2013, 06:07 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
You can try the cleaner but it won't remove the old stain very well and you will probably have to resort to sanding. Putting an oil stain over latex stain is not recommended.

but it wont be over latex once i sand it
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Old 06-01-2013, 06:26 PM   #8
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You don't need to sand the spindles
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Old 06-02-2013, 11:17 AM   #9
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Deck Staining


I would wash and sand the deck. Removing as much old/failed coating as possible (off the floor) is going to be crucial to the success of whatever you apply. To me washing first speeds up, and increases the effectiveness of sanding.
I don't like washing alone in most cases. Especially if there Is failed solid coating. I've found sanding to be the best deck prep in most cases. IMO
You don't always have to wash, but I'd doesn't hurt as long as you don't through off the PH of the wood. (Read the directions on the cleaner basically)
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Old 06-02-2013, 04:02 PM   #10
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Deck Staining


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Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
That sure looks like old latex stain the way it is peeling. If it were me I would go after it with a palm sander and some 36 or 40 grit sand paper. That will make quick work of getting that old stain off the deck. Now you can skip the deck cleaner. Then I would get a nice semi-transparent or semi-solid oil stain for the deck boards and a solid latex stain for the spindles.
How can you assume a stain film peeling was latex/acrylic, oil-based, or alkyd based on the fact it is peeling? If the product was supposed to leave some pigment, or lots of it on the surface, and the surface failed? What difference does it make on how to treat it now?

And you cannot be serious about going after any piece of deck wood with 36-40 grit? OP, 80 should be as low as you go. If you had anything left with sanding at 36-40 you would need a box of 80 anyhow to sand out the damage. And no OP, sanding may not get stain stuck in the grain out of your way.

Last edited by user1007; 06-02-2013 at 04:14 PM.
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Old 06-02-2013, 04:27 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Jmayspaint View Post
I would wash and sand the deck. Removing as much old/failed coating as possible (off the floor) is going to be crucial to the success of whatever you apply. To me washing first speeds up, and increases the effectiveness of sanding.
I don't like washing alone in most cases. Especially if there Is failed solid coating. I've found sanding to be the best deck prep in most cases. IMO
You don't always have to wash, but I'd doesn't hurt as long as you don't through off the PH of the wood. (Read the directions on the cleaner basically)
I sort of agree and love that you pointed out knocking off the Ph of a deck with cheap cleaners.

I know we live in a power wash generation but I disagree it is the best solution for cleaning a deck. Darn things use a lot of water and nothing raises grain on the decks in this country faster than water. Something like 60-70 percent of outdoor decks in this country are treated pine. People assume treating them green was waterproofing and that when you hit them with water they would not do what pine does. Check (raise grain) and then you just have to sand more. So wetting a deck anymore than you have to, is not going to decrease the amount of sanding you have to do, is it now?

How we forgot how to use brushes, cleaners, neutralizers and just a simple rinse from a garden hose does amaze me. We put nitro in the tank of the p-washer, pull the cord to show the neighbors, crank the sucker up to 92,000psi and eat through deck boards. And as I mention over and over again, we seem to take them out even in winter to teach our male children the equivalent of peeing their names in the snow. Why bother when a pressure washer can do the same?

The scales are a bit different but I am going to attach a wood hardness scale again. I could translate the Janka hardness scale to PSI resistance but those of you who abused power washer already know. And treating pine does not increase its strength. Turn the things down if you must use them on pine.
Attached Thumbnails
Deck Staining-hardness-scale.jpg  

Last edited by user1007; 06-02-2013 at 04:32 PM.
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Old 06-02-2013, 05:13 PM   #12
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Deck Staining


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Originally Posted by sdsester
I sort of agree and love that you pointed out knocking off the Ph of a deck with cheap cleaners.

I know we live in a power wash generation but I disagree it is the best solution for cleaning a deck. Darn things use a lot of water and nothing raises grain on the decks in this country faster than water. Something like 60-70 percent of outdoor decks in this country are treated pine. People assume treating them green was waterproofing and that when you hit them with water they would not do what pine does. Check (raise grain) and then you just have to sand more. So wetting a deck anymore than you have to, is not going to decrease the amount of sanding you have to do, is it now?
Whether or not power washing specs up or slows down the sanding process depends on the substrate, and the goals of your prep work.
Often, when I'm dealing with a really neglected deck that has a lot of failing product and deteriorated wood, its necessary to completely remove several layers of wood. In these cases, 'hard washing' a deck can be beneficial as the raised grain/ splintering is easier to sand off than just sanding through those wood layers intact, and sanding through all the failed coating.
Part or the reason I use this system sometimes to strip a deck is to avoid using chemicals ( I hate stripper)

However, I completely agrees that pressure washing is overplayed. The first thing I recommend to customers for maintaining a deck I finish is; don't let it get dirty enough to need pressure washing. For regular maintaince, a hose and a scrub brush will actually clean better and is less risky. I recommend a light washing every 12-18 months.
I'm also leery about recommending 'hard washing' to a DYI, because it can easily be over done. And you really have to follow through with the sanding (lot of labor) or its a mess.
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Old 06-07-2013, 01:53 AM   #13
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Deck Staining


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Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
You don't need to sand the spindles
why is that? so i can repaint the spindles over the old paint?
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Old 06-07-2013, 01:55 AM   #14
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Deck Staining


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmayspaint View Post
I would wash and sand the deck. Removing as much old/failed coating as possible (off the floor) is going to be crucial to the success of whatever you apply. To me washing first speeds up, and increases the effectiveness of sanding.
I don't like washing alone in most cases. Especially if there Is failed solid coating. I've found sanding to be the best deck prep in most cases. IMO
You don't always have to wash, but I'd doesn't hurt as long as you don't through off the PH of the wood. (Read the directions on the cleaner basically)

Can i use a cleaner like this: http://www.homedepot.ca/product/thom...cleaner/902907. Any proper washing method you recommend? Also dont i have to wash the deck after sanding as well? Is staining the deck enough? do i need to apply any kind of sealant ?

Last edited by GanJa; 06-07-2013 at 02:24 AM.
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Old 06-07-2013, 02:03 AM   #15
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Deck Staining


Also guys i found this old bucket of paint in my garage heres how it looks like from outside:
http://imageshack.us/a/img203/4236/photo6sc.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img845/2719/photo5jij.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img39/9329/photo4xu.jpg
http://img801.imageshack.us/img801/7097/photovkp.jpg

When i opened it. It had a hard layer on the top and when i popped it it was all oily. I was expecting it to be a grey paint that i have right now on my deck. So what is this ? Is this useable?

Also when painting is better to use a brush or long-handled paint roller?

Also wht kind of sanding machine you guys recommend? A orbital sander like this: or something like this:

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Last edited by GanJa; 06-07-2013 at 02:25 AM.
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