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frankthetoad 07-22-2007 02:00 PM

Cutting a wall?
 
My wife and I just bought our first home. The entire house will need painting, and this forum has helped guide my paint and painting products buying decisions. Tomorrow we will jump head first into the task, and I had one question (for now, anyway :) ) before I begin. I notice in a lot of posts that people say you need to "cut a wall" before you begin rolling it on. Reading between the lines, I take this to mean you need to use a brush to paint all of the edges of the wall, i.e, paint the corners, and the edge of the walls at the ceiling and the floor. Is my guess correct? Is there more to this than I have gathered? How wide a swath needs to be painted?

Thanks in advance to a new DIYer!

ron schenker 07-22-2007 04:17 PM

You got it right! Swath should be about 2-3" wide. I use a 2 1/2" angled "Purdy" brush.

send_it_all 07-23-2007 02:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ron schenker (Post 54035)
You got it right! Swath should be about 2-3" wide. I use a 2 1/2" angled "Purdy" brush.

Bingo.....and try to do it without using masking tape. It will come out better if you take your time and freehand a straight line. The brush will kind of and ride in the corner creating a pretty straight line by itself. If you try to use tape, the paint will likely seep behind the tape looking like crap.

Dusty 07-23-2007 05:54 AM

I know this may not be the proper way to do things, but it works for me. I cut the whole room before I pull out the roller. It's pretty hard for me to cut and then roll and not have the paint already dry anyway so to avoid the line the now dry paint leaves where it was cut, I feather the paint edge with the brush. So when I've finished cutting it's about 6 - 8" wide or so with the part next to the ceiling or floor or whatever being totally covered for at least 3".

Also the last time I had to do a lot of painting I bought a new style brush which is cone shaped vs the normal slanted brush. Once I got the hang of that it worked great, no tape required. Whether you use a slanted or cone shaped brush, keep it loaded as it is just easier to control.

frankthetoad 07-23-2007 06:40 AM

Thanks for the help! I'm hoping to begin my painting adventure tonight!

AtlanticWBConst. 07-23-2007 07:42 AM

Actually, for information's sake: I believe the term is "Cutting-in" ..... (at least in my region it is)

csvharvest 07-23-2007 09:43 PM

If you are doing 2 coats the line don't need to be perfect in the first coat. Fix it with the 2nd coat. 2 cts

frankthetoad 07-24-2007 06:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by csvharvest (Post 54259)
If you are doing 2 coats the line don't need to be perfect in the first coat. Fix it with the 2nd coat. 2 cts

I think I may still be missing an essential part of this technique. When you say "line", do you mean that the line of paint farthest from the corner you're painting in should be perfectly straight? Won't this get rolled over anyway?

Also, what is meant when posters have said you need to maintain a wet edge? Is it the cut line that needs to be wet when you first apply paint up against it with a roller?

Thanks for being patient with the noobishness of my questions!

Dusty 07-24-2007 01:46 PM

A wet edge is referring to the edge of any paint where more paint is being added. In this case, the line being cut in and the paint from the roller. If you paint over the area you cut in and it is already dry and has a definite edge, you will have a line after as the paint won't really level between the areas (if it's wet the paint blends together). It ends up looking pretty awful especially if the light hits it from an angle. That's why you either have to make sure that cut in area is either still wet or feathered when you start rolling so there is no definite edge. Also never start/stop painting in the middle of a wall. Always start/end at corners and do each entire wall to get a completely smooth wall.

frankthetoad 07-24-2007 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dusty (Post 54341)
A wet edge is referring to the edge of any paint where more paint is being added. In this case, the line being cut in and the paint from the roller. If you paint over the area you cut in and it is already dry and has a definite edge, you will have a line after as the paint won't really level between the areas (if it's wet the paint blends together). It ends up looking pretty awful especially if the light hits it from an angle. That's why you either have to make sure that cut in area is either still wet or feathered when you start rolling so there is no definite edge. Also never start/stop painting in the middle of a wall. Always start/end at corners and do each entire wall to get a completely smooth wall.

So you either have to roll really fast after you've cut in the whole wall, or you have to cut in the wall one side at a time? Does this also apply to a primer coat?

Dusty 07-24-2007 05:05 PM

You got it. If there are two people painting it isn't a huge deal as one person cuts in ahead of the other using the roller, but with only one person...well unless you are really fast (meaning you can cut in fast which is hard if you are inexperienced) or like to switch back and forth a lot, it's hard to work a whole edge before where you started is already drying. Again, that is why I feather the paint and it's never been an issue.

Yes, that includes primer. You don't want to see that line/lump where paint went over a dry edge.

Feather it out and you won't have a problem. If it's your first time painting you don't need to be rushing or you will be making a mess. Take your time with the edges so you get them straight, feather the edge away from the corner so you don't have to hurry, and roll nice and steady a whole wall at a time overlapping so you don't get lines. Keep your brush and roller loaded.

Just a tip, don't wear shoes. If you paint in bare feet you will feel it if you step in a drip before you track it all over the house.

ron schenker 07-24-2007 06:45 PM

Quote:

Just a tip, don't wear shoes. If you paint in bare feet you will feel it if you step in a drip before you track it all over the house
Make sure you open all of the windows to ventilate that bad foot odor:laughing:

csvharvest 07-24-2007 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frankthetoad (Post 54288)
I think I may still be missing an essential part of this technique. When you say "line", do you mean that the line of paint farthest from the corner you're painting in should be perfectly straight? Won't this get rolled over anyway?

Also, what is meant when posters have said you need to maintain a wet edge? Is it the cut line that needs to be wet when you first apply paint up against it with a roller?

Thanks for being patient with the noobishness of my questions!


Frank,
What i mean is the cut in line to the very corner.
If u are using a white tint primer and 2 coats of finish coat
and u have problems cutting in a straight line, on your first coat don't worry about a straight line up to the corner when u do your second coat straghten it out
It may also help u maintain a wet edge

one other thing ,I usually never maintain a wet edge with a primer. I cut every thing then roll. I apply primer slightly lighter than finish coat to avoid the hump.

BilHam 07-27-2007 07:19 PM

I've had good results with one of those cut-in rolling pads, red holder with rectangular pads and bitty wheels that run along the ceiling (or moulding, whatever). You need to practice-- be sure to keep paint off the wheels, and don't over-saturate the pad. Sometimes I just apply paint to the pad with a brush or pat it on the upper part of a paint tray and roll away. Start just under the ceiling and go up, swipe as far as you can reach, come down and then come back. You can feather the edge with a third swipe just under your first two. I get a near perfect cut, and it's faster than using a brush. As much as I've painted, I still can't cut in straight. Pros manage it, but not me. Try it!

HiFi 07-29-2007 12:37 AM

U got it right my friend.Thats what it means.

Quote:

Swath should be about 2-3" wide. I use a 2 1/2" angled "Purdy" brush
thats what i do too.


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