Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-20-2013, 07:30 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Quote:
Originally Posted by ToolSeeker View Post
I kinda doubt there is plaster by mid 60s almost everything was drywall but possible. LOL I can just see me telling a customer paint peeling we need to tear the wall out. Really looks to me like some DIY gone bad wrong materials, little skill = what you see.
I can't recollect ever seeing paint peeling like that on drywall, but many times on plaster. I agree that it probably isn't though. There must be a gloss under that, but even so. The problem was not with the green top coat but a gold color underneath the green. You can see it on the curled edge in one of the pics.

jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 07:37 PM   #17
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


The fact that there is drywall paper exposed puts the plaster idea to rest.
I agree that it is probably some latex over a hard oil- might be a lead based oil.., and having no prep to have adhesion.

I would scrape off what can be scraped, wash with a TSP substitute ( better than real TSP because it usually is no rinse) , prime with a high adhesion primer- could use gardz all over- ( saturate the torn sr paper) , mud smooth, sand , reprime- finish 2 coats.
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Brushjockey For This Useful Post:
JamesRW (01-20-2013)
Old 01-20-2013, 07:50 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
The fact that there is drywall paper exposed puts the plaster idea to rest.
I agree that it is probably some latex over a hard oil- might be a lead based oil.., and having no prep to have adhesion.

I would scrape off what can be scraped, wash with a TSP substitute ( better than real TSP because it usually is no rinse) , prime with a high adhesion primer- could use gardz all over- ( saturate the torn sr paper) , mud smooth, sand , reprime- finish 2 coats.
Not so fast there Baba Louie! I've done jobs over the years where there is plaster and board in the house, and one in the past few months where there was both in the same room. So there I think our houses are older than yours, generally.
jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 08:22 PM   #19
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Probably rooms where Joe C tore out the walls- lol
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Brushjockey For This Useful Post:
chrisn (01-21-2013), jsheridan (01-20-2013)
Old 01-20-2013, 08:34 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lynnwood, WA
Posts: 729
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
The issue with the mud boils down to one thing, water, and no matter how fast they set or hard they get, they go on wet. The water in the compound will evaporate off the top AND absorb into the brown drywall paper, and it will vaporize back there and damage any patch that goes over it. Oil primer or Gardz must be used to prevent the moisture from going into the brown paper.

I get what you're saying....but after a few days, most of the moisture will have moved out of the drywall and can then be primed safely.
Seattle2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 08:37 PM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lynnwood, WA
Posts: 729
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
Please - joe c , jagens and anybody who constantly advises people to tear the walls out. Stop it.

I'm glad somebody finally spoke up. Thank you! It was getting a bit irritating. Unfortunately, not everyoine has the means to "Mike Holmes" every project.
Seattle2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 08:49 PM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MN
Posts: 68
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Many thanks for all the detailed information explaining what to do and WHY!

Haven't made the final decision on who is going to do the sheetrock, but the company I thought was our 1st choice was adamant that the Guardz treatment was unnecessary.
JamesRW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 08:51 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MN
Posts: 68
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle2k View Post
I get what you're saying....but after a few days, most of the moisture will have moved out of the drywall and can then be primed safely.
So, are you saying you think it would be ok to skip the Guardz, OR this is how you would bid and do a professional job?
JamesRW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 09:14 PM   #24
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


What the Gardz will do. ( or oil like cover stain- shellac will also work)
It will saturate and seal ( make a vapor barrier ) the flaky torn sheetrock paper that will most probably bubble with the moisture from the mud if left raw.
Then you will need to cut out the bubbles and then do what you should have done to begin with- prime them- and remud . basically backing up 2 steps.
You can take a chance and wing it- but I wouldn't.

The other thing is you need to get a good adhesion on the paint underneath, or you will be causing the same problem all over again.
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS

Last edited by Brushjockey; 01-20-2013 at 09:17 PM.
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 10:48 PM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lynnwood, WA
Posts: 729
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesRW View Post
So, are you saying you think it would be ok to skip the Guardz, OR this is how you would bid and do a professional job?
As long as the drywall was allowed to adequately dry, there should be no problem mudding before priming. Do you disagree? Or am I missing something? Note - I'm not trying to be a smartass...just thinking logically that it shouldn't matter, if the moisture has moved out of the drywall before the primer goes on.
Seattle2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 11:00 PM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle2k View Post
I get what you're saying....but after a few days, most of the moisture will have moved out of the drywall and can then be primed safely.
NO! I did a job in December on a kitchen remodel where the contractor thought he'd do me a favor and do the bulk of the spackling; after he removed the wallpaper, didn't wash the walls to remove the paste, and then slathered mud all over the damaged BROWN paper. He did this in early October and I painted in mid December, when I had to deal with all his failed patches. NEVER spackle over the brown drywall paper layer without a vapor barrier. Even if the drywall has "dried out" as you say, the vapor buildup has caused air pockets under the patch where the dried mud is no longer bonded to the drywall. Please don't argue this point anymore, you're wrong.
OP, Gardz the rock or be sorry, and if your drywall guy doesn't think it's necessary, you do it before he comes or hire one who knows what he's doing. I never thought a contractor, in my case, who's been in the business for thirty years would make that mistake, but he did, and it cost me. When I told him about it, and then showed him, he had that stupid "been schooled" look on his face. Don't have a stupid "been schooled" look on your face.
jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to jsheridan For This Useful Post:
Brushjockey (01-21-2013), JamesRW (01-21-2013)
Old 01-21-2013, 03:12 AM   #27
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,733
Rewards Points: 4
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


listen to him ^
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to chrisn For This Useful Post:
jsheridan (01-21-2013)
Old 01-21-2013, 05:32 AM   #28
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
Please - joe c , jagens and anybody who constantly advises people to tear the walls out. Stop it.
just because you don't know how to repair- doesn't mean it can't be done.
And tearing out the walls- which means redoing or replacing all the trim too is just irresponsible advice.
Imo of course- but it is a very educated opinion.
I agree. It goes to show that when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. I'm not trying to bust anyone's bells, and I'm not perfect nor bragging, but seeking a little respect.
I started painting as a young kid with my Dad. At 14-15 I went to work with my uncle, who was a journeyman roofer and general contractor. When I wasn't doing the painting work he sold, I was working at his right hand doing everything else. I worked every chance I got. I worked weekends year round, any time school was closed, all through the summers during HS, and then full time after graduation for four or five years, minus a year as a painting apprentice. While you couldn't find many kids to do this today, in the summer we would many days pack up just ahead of the darkness. We worked long and hard and I learned a lot.
I can perform most minor masonry tasks, and I still use that skill to this day on my jobs

I can perform many minor carpentry tasks, still use them today on my jobs, and have done some things that surprise carpenters

I can not only measure/design, but fabricate window and trim capping, and I still utilize that skill on my jobs today

I can fabricate and install gutter and downspout systems, and I still use that skill to this day on my jobs

At 19 I ran a crew and my first job as such was to insulate, and install siding and capping on a three story Victorian house, which still sits in great shape, though faded, some thirty three years later.

The only types of roof I've never installed is hot and rubber. Tin, copper fabricating and installing, slate, tile, I've worked on them all. Just a few years ago I teamed with my Uncle to do a huge shake roof for one of my customers. Forgive my not remembering the square. I'm more than comfortable shaking. While I don't install roofs on my own, I still do a few repairs for customers each year, and I'm proud to say I've found a few leaks that stymied roofers.

With all that established, none of that makes me a mason, a carpenter, a sider, a gutter guy, nor a roofer. And I would still defer, generally, to all those tradesmen, despite my knowledge. And, I wouldn't surf those forums presenting myself to homeowners as an authority on any of those trades, because I'm not. Please reciprocate that respect.
jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 06:17 AM   #29
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,733
Rewards Points: 4
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
I agree. It goes to show that when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. I'm not trying to bust anyone's bells, and I'm not perfect nor bragging, but seeking a little respect.
I started painting as a young kid with my Dad. At 14-15 I went to work with my uncle, who was a journeyman roofer and general contractor. When I wasn't doing the painting work he sold, I was working at his right hand doing everything else. I worked every chance I got. I worked weekends year round, any time school was closed, all through the summers during HS, and then full time after graduation for four or five years, minus a year as a painting apprentice. While you couldn't find many kids to do this today, in the summer we would many days pack up just ahead of the darkness. We worked long and hard and I learned a lot.
I can perform most minor masonry tasks, and I still use that skill to this day on my jobs

I can perform many minor carpentry tasks, still use them today on my jobs, and have done some things that surprise carpenters

I can not only measure/design, but fabricate window and trim capping, and I still utilize that skill on my jobs today

I can fabricate and install gutter and downspout systems, and I still use that skill to this day on my jobs

At 19 I ran a crew and my first job as such was to insulate, and install siding and capping on a three story Victorian house, which still sits in great shape, though faded, some thirty three years later.

The only types of roof I've never installed is hot and rubber. Tin, copper fabricating and installing, slate, tile, I've worked on them all. Just a few years ago I teamed with my Uncle to do a huge shake roof for one of my customers. Forgive my not remembering the square. I'm more than comfortable shaking. While I don't install roofs on my own, I still do a few repairs for customers each year, and I'm proud to say I've found a few leaks that stymied roofers.

With all that established, none of that makes me a mason, a carpenter, a sider, a gutter guy, nor a roofer. And I would still defer, generally, to all those tradesmen, despite my knowledge. And, I wouldn't surf those forums presenting myself to homeowners as an authority on any of those trades, because I'm not. Please reciprocate that respect.

yes well said ( all of it)
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to chrisn For This Useful Post:
jsheridan (01-21-2013)
Old 01-21-2013, 11:33 AM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MN
Posts: 68
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Combination of Paint Issues


Thanks again for the further clarification! I will proceed as directed by Brushjockey and JSheridan and report back with the results.

JamesRW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
guardz, no primer used, paint peeling, torn sheetrock


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
cheap paint in bathroom got mold? mayhem69 Painting 12 05-06-2012 04:46 PM
Ceiling paint versus wall paint billyg Painting 6 02-09-2012 07:38 PM
1st Steps in Painting? Qckrun Painting 7 12-15-2009 12:25 PM
Flashing NoExperience Painting 13 09-04-2008 05:56 AM
Paint will not stick in Bathroom! SGTHetland Painting 9 08-17-2008 11:04 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.