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Old 09-09-2008, 07:06 PM   #1
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


I have heard great things about sherwin Williams from contractors but have not heard much about colorwheel. Saw 1 post in which colorwheel was recommended. Is colorwheel also a good brand? In particular I was looking at loxon xp vs flexlox for a stucco house. Flex lox was on bobvilla website and looks good and one contractor recommended it in florida. If you wanted to protect a house against wind driven rain and to hide/prevent cracking which paint would it be? Also feel free to recommend something else by another company but it appears that these are the best(?).

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Old 09-09-2008, 09:40 PM   #2
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


Maybe someone can comment on porter paint. Mayber permanizer for stucco or another product.

thanks

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Old 09-09-2008, 10:12 PM   #3
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


New home builders like colorwheel for one reason... very cheap.
( not as in good value for the money) read the labels..look at the coverage rate.

Some people will endorse anything for a price.

Do you have painted stucco exterior walls that you want to paint?

Do you live in Florida? What is on the walls now? what is the condition of the surface and do you have cracks to deal with?
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Old 09-10-2008, 05:20 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Big Bob View Post
Some people will endorse anything for a price.
That Mr. Villa endorses it only means that the check cleared
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Old 09-10-2008, 08:51 AM   #5
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


I live in florida. Currently the stucco on the exterior walls are painted. I had cracks which I had caulked. The paint they supposidly used was color wheel 100% acrylic latex about 4 years ago.
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Old 09-10-2008, 12:48 PM   #6
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


I have used Loxon Xp on several stucco jobs without any issues. It is expensive, and you need to properly prep the stucco surface, but it is a good product and can be tinted. Generally the coverage is 75% of what the product specs list. I wouldn't go cheap on a stucco top coat though.
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Old 09-10-2008, 07:55 PM   #7
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


So... after 4 years OP is ready for another paint job... and wonders if they should use the same thing?

Try Bene Moore elastomeric and post again in 8 to 10 years...
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Old 09-10-2008, 08:11 PM   #8
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


I am getting tired of filling in cracks. I guess i was reading where companies will put out crap and also great products. I guess companies will use the cheapest stuff as long as it last 2 years to get them out of the warrenty. But it sounds like color wheel does not have any good products. It was recommended by a paint contractractor because of its quality. Good thing I asked. So maybe it is between shirwin williams and benjamin moore. BTW, what is the name of BMoore product?

Last edited by ericwashere; 09-10-2008 at 08:20 PM.
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Old 09-10-2008, 09:11 PM   #9
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


Go to a BM store... You will find some trowel and brush grade products to help deal with the stucco cracks.. they are easy to use.

Bring some photos ..is the current surface ok ..or.. does it leave a residue on yor hand when you wipe it?

Most BM deaalers are helpful good neighbors... They won't sell you what you don't need.... you may need to plan on pressure washing as part of your proper prep.

PS BM ...does not pay me.. They have had great product that makes my clients very happy.... for a long time. And that makes me happy.
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Old 09-10-2008, 10:48 PM   #10
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


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Originally Posted by ericwashere View Post
I am getting tired of filling in cracks. I guess i was reading where companies will put out crap and also great products. I guess companies will use the cheapest stuff as long as it last 2 years to get them out of the warrenty. But it sounds like color wheel does not have any good products. It was recommended by a paint contractractor because of its quality. Good thing I asked. So maybe it is between shirwin williams and benjamin moore. BTW, what is the name of BMoore product?
You're probably thinking of the Benjamin Moore "Elastomeric Coating". Anyone's elastomeric coating does much the same thing. It's made from a plastic similar to what they make "Stretch Armstrong" toys out of. So, when a crack opens up because of building movement (or whatever) then the elastomeric coating stretches to span across that gap. When the gap closes again, the elastomeric coating reverts back to it's previous shape, thereby shrinking to close with the crack.

You should keep in mind that with the exception of ICI of Britain, who make CIL and Glidden paints, NO PAINT COMPANY makes anything in the cans of paint they sell. They simply buy the resins, pigments and additives from chemical companies like Rohm & Haas, DuPont, S. C. Johnson Wax, Eastman Chemical, Sun Chemical, Avecia, Thor Chemicals, Kronos, etc.

These companies are continually trying to get the paint companies to buy their latest and greatest resin, or pigment or rheology modifier or surfactant or whatever for use in their paint. The paint companies won't buy it unless they're convinced that the more expensive component will make a comensuarate improvement in the performance of their paints.

So, ANY paint company can make truly excellent paints. They just have to buy the best resins, best pigments and best additives available, at whatever the price.

So, in summary, "quality" is not an engineering limitation in that some paint companies hire smarter engineers than other paint companies. It is a management decision on how high a quality paint to make, and what selling price to shoot for. Colourwheel can certainly make excellent paints, but it may be that their management believes that they can do better by selling less expensive paint to house painters rather than more expensive paints to home owners.
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Old 09-11-2008, 11:21 AM   #11
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


Thanks. That is great information. Pretty good stuff. Paint companies just buy the products and mix them together to create a paint that exhibit a certain characteristic that they want. In my case since I live in a moist environment and will have wind driven rain and cracks in stucco I would want a formula specifically tailored to stucco, covering cracks, prevent rain from coming in, allow moisture to evaporation(breathe). Since that is what flex lox claims and loxon I was not sure which one has proven itself. But it appears that other paint companies need to be taken into consideration such as Bmoore or porter. Looks like flex lox is not liked because color wheel is not necessarily trusted to provide a product that would fit that need. It might be that since the hurricanes in 2004 they tried to answer the issue with flex lox since most builders use them and there was some serious issues with there standard paint and builders would not want to use them anymore. Has anybody used flex lox maybe they did answer the call? One painter was going to use flex lox and the other was going to use loxon. I guess those are my choices. I could probably tell either one of them to use another brand if there is something that is better. If someone says yes flex lox i have used and I have use loxon and they like one over the other that would be great info too.
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Old 09-11-2008, 11:57 AM   #12
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colorwheel vs Sherwin Williams


Up here in MN we have the moisture, but we also have the temperature swings -40 in winter to 100 in summer. These temperature extremes cause major expansion/contraction issues and you learn quick which products are capable. Loxon is an acrylic polymer coating that has stood up to these adverse conditions. It also will shed dust/ dirt when washed annually. If maintained you can get by for 15 years or more. I have not used the flex lock, haven't seen it, but it may be comparable.

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