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-   -   Catalyzed Epoxy??? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/catalyzed-epoxy-119255/)

jschaben 10-04-2011 09:48 PM

Catalyzed Epoxy???
 
Had to do some touch up(read repaint) on some door frames at work. They handed me a can of Sherwin Williams Industrial and Marine Enamel, Catalyzed Epoxy Part A.
What the hey, never heard of it but it brushes and levels beatifully, cleans up with water and is dry to the touch in about 30 minutes. Hard, glossy shine... What's not to like?
I'm in the midst of repainting my kitchen cabinets.. will likely do the bath next... and have just switched to ProCoat. Matter of fact, I repainted what I had done with Rustoleum painters touch to get the ProCoat finish.
Now I'm wondering if I shouldn't just find a good stopping point and finish it up with the epoxy or is there some reason I haven't heard about it in here or in other forums.:huh:

jsheridan 10-05-2011 06:45 PM

John, you're not hanging around in the right forums. That's an industrial coating. I doubt it would be a standard shelf item in many SW stores, unless they were central to an area where a lot of industrial/marine activity occurs. Most likely would have to be ordered. I don't see why you couldn't use it on your kitchen cabinets. But, it may not be the best around food stuffs, I would look into that first. There are those that would be safe though and be comparable. I'm curious though, the can says Part A, what happened to Part B? Having "part A" in the name would indicate a two part system, the coating and the curing agent/hardener.

jschaben 10-05-2011 07:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 742934)
John, you're not hanging around in the right forums. That's an industrial coating. I doubt it would be a standard shelf item in many SW stores, unless they were central to an area where a lot of industrial/marine activity occurs. Most likely would have to be ordered. I don't see why you couldn't use it on your kitchen cabinets. But, it may not be the best around food stuffs, I would look into that first. There are those that would be safe though and be comparable. I'm curious though, the can says Part A, what happened to Part B? Having "part A" in the name would indicate a two part system, the coating and the curing agent/hardener.

Hi Joe - Thanks for the response. Part B is a good question. Super didn't seem to know.. All the epoxies.... adhesives and such... I've worked with the Part B was the catalyst and once A and B were mixed, the stuff started to cure.. Appparently not so here. This "touch up" can I've been working from is a good 5 years old. About a 3rd of a gallon left. Was a bit thick but mixed in an ounce or two of water and it was good to go. I may take a pic of the can and stop by my local SW. More than likely it will be some VERY hi $$$ stuff which would steer me off very much of it.:)

jsheridan 10-05-2011 07:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jschaben (Post 742942)
Hi Joe - Thanks for the response. Part B is a good question. Super didn't seem to know.. All the epoxies.... adhesives and such... I've worked with the Part B was the catalyst and once A and B were mixed, the stuff started to cure.. Appparently not so here. This "touch up" can I've been working from is a good 5 years old. About a 3rd of a gallon left. Was a bit thick but mixed in an ounce or two of water and it was good to go. I may take a pic of the can and stop by my local SW. More than likely it will be some VERY hi $$$ stuff which would steer me off very much of it.:)

Definitely. But if it gives you a superior finish for your cabinets, it's ony a one shot deal. Just check for food stuff compatiblility.
BTW, it's not impossible that what it says on the label is not what's in the can. Quite a few times I come across situations where people use an empty can to work out of and just throw a lid on it, put it on the shelf. Something doesn't sound right there. If that was mixed five years ago, a little dab of water wouldn't do ya. Trivia question, What product did that little modified jingle sell at one time?

ltd 10-05-2011 07:29 PM

byrlcreem:yes:

jsheridan 10-05-2011 09:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ltd (Post 742961)
byrlcreem:yes:

Yes Folks, we have a winner, LTD. He's over forty. Brylcreem, a little dab'll do ya! Early slick back hair stuff, for the younger set.
Good Job ltd:thumbup:

jschaben 10-05-2011 09:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 743050)
Yes Folks, we have a winner, LTD. He's over forty. Brylcreem, a little dab'll do ya! Early slick back hair stuff, for the younger set.
Good Job ltd:thumbup:


I think I remember that... havin hair I mean:laughing:

jschaben 10-05-2011 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 742947)
Definitely. But if it gives you a superior finish for your cabinets, it's ony a one shot deal. Just check for food stuff compatiblility.
BTW, it's not impossible that what it says on the label is not what's in the can. Quite a few times I come across situations where people use an empty can to work out of and just throw a lid on it, put it on the shelf. Something doesn't sound right there. If that was mixed five years ago, a little dab of water wouldn't do ya. Trivia question, What product did that little modified jingle sell at one time?


I dunno joe - I got some 12 or 15 year old Moorgard in the basement I broke out last summer and just mixed it up. Only thing about it was I treated it with Floetrol for spraying when I first got it.

jsheridan 10-05-2011 10:06 PM

Use to be able to say "Grass doesn't grow on a busy street", which worked until someone realized it doesn't grow on a bowling ball either. :laughing:
Easy for me to say. :laughing:

jsheridan 10-05-2011 10:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jschaben (Post 743057)
I dunno joe - I got some 12 or 15 year old Moorgard in the basement I broke out last summer and just mixed it up. Only thing about it was I treated it with Floetrol for spraying when I first got it.

I meant if it was a two part epoxy mixed five years ago. A little trick to storing paint long term is to put a quarter inch or so of solvent, water or thinner, on top of the paint before lidding it. Some, but not all of the solvent will evaporate in the can, while the rest will keep the paint sealed below. You have to do it slowly so as the solvent doesn't mix in but just lay on the top.

jschaben 10-06-2011 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 743062)
I meant if it was a two part epoxy mixed five years ago. A little trick to storing paint long term is to put a quarter inch or so of solvent, water or thinner, on top of the paint before lidding it. Some, but not all of the solvent will evaporate in the can, while the rest will keep the paint sealed below. You have to do it slowly so as the solvent doesn't mix in but just lay on the top.

Hi Joe - I have been doing some other research and am thinking it may be a modified epoxy that never really had a hardener mixed in. Solidifies just with solvent evaporation with a hardener used to accelerate the process. As quickly as it dries to the the touch though, not sure that makes any sense. I'm way over my head on the technical aspects of the stuff now but I do think I will look into the price point and see if it would be feasable to start using as a interior trim paint. Another point I picked up about epoxies is that they do chalk badly with UV exposure unless well treated with blockers. Thanks for the info:thumbsup:

Matthewt1970 10-08-2011 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jschaben (Post 743243)
Hi Joe - I have been doing some other research and am thinking it may be a modified epoxy that never really had a hardener mixed in. Solidifies just with solvent evaporation with a hardener used to accelerate the process. As quickly as it dries to the the touch though, not sure that makes any sense. I'm way over my head on the technical aspects of the stuff now but I do think I will look into the price point and see if it would be feasable to start using as a interior trim paint. Another point I picked up about epoxies is that they do chalk badly with UV exposure unless well treated with blockers. Thanks for the info:thumbsup:

I was thinking that too but all the 2 part mixes I have used from SW were Xylene based and are gonna harden wether you apply it or leave it in the can.

jschaben 10-10-2011 08:30 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Finally occurred to me just to take a picture of the can and see if anyone recognizes it.:jester:

dreamlily27 10-11-2011 07:51 AM

Hey, can I jump in here and ask a question off the main subject? I noticed that one of you said to add 1/4" of solvent, thinner, or water to paint if you are going to store it long term.... I have a lot of paint that I'm storing long-term. I've had some interior gallons of paints stored in my laundry room, some for 6 months, some as long as 2 years. I've opened them and stirred them and they still seem to be GOOD. Is it too late to add the solvent or thinner to THESE cans? I understand that the idea is to make sure it doesn't mix in with the paint when you add it but what about when you are ready to use the paint? Do you mix it in then? Or do you have to try to scoop it off? Probably sounds like a dumb question and if so I'm sorry.... I'm just a single woman here trying to learn this DIY stuff! 

jschaben 10-11-2011 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dreamlily27 (Post 746456)
Hey, can I jump in here and ask a question off the main subject? I noticed that one of you said to add 1/4" of solvent, thinner, or water to paint if you are going to store it long term.... I have a lot of paint that I'm storing long-term. I've had some interior gallons of paints stored in my laundry room, some for 6 months, some as long as 2 years. I've opened them and stirred them and they still seem to be GOOD. Is it too late to add the solvent or thinner to THESE cans? I understand that the idea is to make sure it doesn't mix in with the paint when you add it but what about when you are ready to use the paint? Do you mix it in then? Or do you have to try to scoop it off? Probably sounds like a dumb question and if so I'm sorry.... I'm just a single woman here trying to learn this DIY stuff! 

Hi Lilly - Latex or oil paint? Certainly don't add water to oil paints. For long term storage, I've had good luck treating them with a paint conditioner such as Floetrol for latex paint or Penetrol for oil base. You need to make sure the lip of the can is clean, no pooled paint in the little groove around the top so the lid seals good. Usually, I punch a dozen or so drain holes in the bottom of that groove when I first open the can so that it drains instead of collects there. This ensures a tight seal. A couple of other things I've heard of doing that would probably help is cover the can with plastic wrap (Saran Wrap) before installing the lid to help seal it and storing well sealed cans upside down so that when solids seperate out, they end up on the bottom when you right the can and open it again.

You will generally get more and better responses starting a seperate thread for a topic not related to the thread though. Might ask a mod to move this though as I can see it becoming pretty involved:)


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