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timothy5hol 05-24-2012 07:14 PM

Canvas walls
 
My father-in-law has a home that is 90+ years old. He has canvas walls (and ceilings) that have been painted. A roof leak has caused some peeling / buckling of the canvas. Does anyone still sell canvas so that I can "patch" the damaged area. Nobody seems to know what I am talking about when I go to home improvement stores.

joecaption 05-24-2012 07:17 PM

I'm pretty sure no one's going to have a clue what your talking about on this one.
I've been rehabing 100 plus year old houses off and on for 30 years plus and have never even heard of one.
Post some pictures.
If you Yahoo "canvas ceiling repair) some sites come up.

chrisn 05-25-2012 04:20 AM

It was a very common "wall covering" back in the day. I still see it all the time around here. It was apparently put up to hide the hairline cracks in the plaster.Try looking under old restoration sites. If I have time I will look for it.

chrisn 05-25-2012 04:26 AM

http://www.ehow.com/how_7895780_repa...r-plaster.html

timothy5hol 05-26-2012 12:14 PM

canvas walls
 
Thanks for the "heads up", chrisn. The E-how link is very helpful. Now I just need to find a store that carries "resurfacing paper". The ACE hardware by me didn't know what I was talking about. Any leads would be appreciated.

user1007 05-26-2012 12:21 PM

An art supply store will have canvas in varying grades and thicknesses and in bulk rolls, primed and unprimed. An awning company or even fabric store might be willing to order for you.

Brushjockey 05-26-2012 12:45 PM

I've run into it very often in old houses. It was called oil cloth, but basically a tight muslin that was hung directly on plaster. They used a wheat paste to put it on, which turns to powder after a hunnerd years or so.
I always removed it totally, repaired and probably skimmed the plaster and made a good surface.
Back then, paints were poor and getting them to stick to new plaster was hard. That and they didn't have to finish the plaster quite as far were the reasons it was used.

(another lesson for ol Joe too!)

chrisn 05-27-2012 03:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 929175)
I've run into it very often in old houses. It was called oil cloth, but basically a tight muslin that was hung directly on plaster. They used a wheat paste to put it on, which turns to powder after a hunnerd years or so.
I always removed it totally, repaired and probably skimmed the plaster and made a good surface.
Back then, paints were poor and getting them to stick to new plaster was hard. That and they didn't have to finish the plaster quite as far were the reasons it was used.

(another lesson for ol Joe too!)



who has been rehabing 100 year old homes for 30 years and HAS NEVER HEARD OF THIS

amazing:eek::laughing::whistling2:

chrisn 05-27-2012 03:30 AM

Here is a a link I came up with

http://www.oilclothbytheyard.com/collections/solid

Brushjockey 05-27-2012 07:04 AM

Chris- not sure if thats the same stuff- but it looks interesting.

BigJim 05-27-2012 07:34 AM

Painters drop cloth at Lowe's is a untreated canvas, not sure if it is preshrunk or not though. If you put preshrunk canvas on the wall and paint it, it will wrinkle, unshrunk won't as it will shrink and tighten up. Most folks now use Titebond II glue to glue the canvas but I am not sure if the paint will crackel or not painted over titebond, I know it will on elmers carpenter glue.

user1007 05-27-2012 07:52 AM

I have had a few experience trying to size a wall and to get fabric applied to it. The project I remember most was for an interior designer that wanted the texture but for whatever reason did not want to go with impregnated vinyl wall covering or even anything with a backing for reasons I do not remember but made little sense to me. It was more than a usual challenge. Of course I have worked with fiberglass cloths laying up and repairing boat hulls. Again, necessary but not what I would call a fun activity.

I kind of cringe at the idea of putting fabric on the wall with an industrial strength glue but maybe one has to do so. I used wallpaper paste which could be why I fought getting it up. And please no I do not like doing wall coverings in the first place so have that bias. I usually subcontracted it out.

I thought of drop cloths too and sometimes Big Lots has thin ones for a couple bucks. In addition to shrinking and pressing them you would need to make sure you get any starch out of them.

I found this link for Chicago Canvas searching for bulk artist canvas. Looks like they have many kinds for different purposes and in extra wide widths. Muslin too.

http://www.chicagocanvas.com/cotton-...FQoDQAod3VqLWA

http://www.chicagocanvas.com/site/pi..._Rolls_057.jpg

I wonder if Nu-Wall would work and be easier? It is hardly what I would call easy to work with either in spite of product claims. For any of these approaches I would encourage you to have an extra set of hands available to help. Abatron carries it. Perhaps others.

http://www.abatron.com/components/co...fa8f7ba626.jpg

timothy5hol 05-28-2012 08:33 AM

canvas walls
 
Thanks for everyone's input. I got "smart" and went to a paint supply store (they supply materials to a lot of the painting contractors in the Chicago area) and they "hooked me up" with some "canvas material". It is actually a "backed" vinyl material, sort of like wallpaper. It seemed to go up easier than I thought...going back today to spackle the seams. I'll let you know the outcome of yesterday's labors. Thanks again for helping out a "neophyte".:thumbup:

BigJim 05-28-2012 09:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 929644)
I have had a few experience trying to size a wall and to get fabric applied to it. The project I remember most was for an interior designer that wanted the texture but for whatever reason did not want to go with impregnated vinyl wall covering or even anything with a backing for reasons I do not remember but made little sense to me. It was more than a usual challenge. Of course I have worked with fiberglass cloths laying up and repairing boat hulls. Again, necessary but not what I would call a fun activity.

I kind of cringe at the idea of putting fabric on the wall with an industrial strength glue but maybe one has to do so. I used wallpaper paste which could be why I fought getting it up. And please no I do not like doing wall coverings in the first place so have that bias. I usually subcontracted it out.

I thought of drop cloths too and sometimes Big Lots has thin ones for a couple bucks. In addition to shrinking and pressing them you would need to make sure you get any starch out of them.

I found this link for Chicago Canvas searching for bulk artist canvas. Looks like they have many kinds for different purposes and in extra wide widths. Muslin too.

http://www.chicagocanvas.com/cotton-...FQoDQAod3VqLWA

http://www.chicagocanvas.com/site/pi..._Rolls_057.jpg

I wonder if Nu-Wall would work and be easier? It is hardly what I would call easy to work with either in spite of product claims. For any of these approaches I would encourage you to have an extra set of hands available to help. Abatron carries it. Perhaps others.

http://www.abatron.com/components/co...fa8f7ba626.jpg

You can tell I really thought this one out, I agree that would be tough to remove on down the road, scratch the Titebond II idea.:)

noquacks 05-28-2012 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 929580)
[/color]

who has been rehabing 100 year old homes for 30 years and HAS NEVER HEARD OF THIS

amazing:eek::laughing::whistling2:

not me- even as a child apprentice painting in victorian homes neighborhoods in southern New England I saw canvas ceilings the first yr at work. You know, pretty much has to do with where you worked, I guess. If one frequents a certain clientelle/regions/neighborhoods, one can work for 50 yrs and never see this......


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