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-   -   can I latex paint over fresh oil stain (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/can-i-latex-paint-over-fresh-oil-stain-125077/)

LidoGirl 11-30-2011 09:26 AM

can I latex paint over fresh oil stain
 
I've been working on refinishing my staircase for a bit now. Sanded down the old pine treads and tried a dozen stain samples on sample wood I thought was the closest match etc etc. Finally bit the bullet yesterday and went ahead with an espresso stain.....and it looks absolutely horrible. :(

I can't say I wasn't warned. I know pine doesnt absorb stain well and the darker the color the worse it takes, I used a conditioner and everything but even though my samples looked good, the real deal looks very "stripey" and the grain contrasts too much with the rest of the wood. I hate it and want to cry. Anyway. I will not go through the sanding process again (my OCD and lack of patience and motiviation simply will not let me) plus I dont think the stain can just be sanded off. I knew this going in. So I feel I have no other choice at this point then to paint the steps. I don't really love the look of painted stairs, especially on the main floor but I'm out of ideas. My question is....can I use a latex paint over these steps that were stained yesterday? I'd prefer not to prime, I'd like to limit the layers of paint I put on. But I should start listening to those who know better, so I will if I have to. Also, I already purchased Oil based floor polyurethane, can I use this over the latex paint to protect it? or should I get a water based? If anyone has any advice I would really really appreciate it. I'd like to get this done before the weekend also....seeing as the holidays are around the corner and I have obligations piling up there also. Thanks soooo much!!

Jen

joecaption 11-30-2011 09:34 AM

If your not willing to put the time in to do it right then the paint is going to fail. I'd prime it with oil based primer, once it's thoroughly dry use latex enamel paint.
Enamel is a much tougher paint.
Never go over paint with any form of poly. The poly is going to turn yellow with age and will peel off over time.

Brushjockey 11-30-2011 09:36 AM

No matter what- you will be probably doing 3 coats to cover- particularly if you go to a light color- so why not do it right.
Make sure the stain is good and dry ( a day or 2), Lightly sand smooth with a 220 sponge, and use a good acrylic primer. My new fav is Zinsser Smart prime, it is a waterborne alkyd , lays down nice and will seal that up good.
Then use a great quality waterborne finish - ( NOT found at HD..) It will cost a bit- but will be worth it.
I like BM paints - Aura Satin, Advance would be 2 choices.
SW makes good ones to- Pro Classic WB. There are quite a few to choose from.
After prime you will need to do any nail hole filling, caulking etc.
Do it right, and it will last.

Good Luck!

LidoGirl 11-30-2011 09:54 AM

I'm still going with a dark color, brown/black espresso like. I said I didnt WANT to prime if it wasn't necessary but I also said if I should I would. I've put a ton of time and money into this already so I'd like to finish it up right. Also, on the poly, I thought water based poly doesnt yellow? Thanks for the quick responses!

mazey 11-30-2011 10:02 AM

i did all the oak floors in my house. like the look of it.was going to refinish the stairs also, but had a few people slip a little on the smooth wood.dog also just slid down them instead of walking down them, had them carpeted along with upstairs hallway. feels much safer, think about that option instead of keeping the paint looking good over time. good luck

jsheridan 11-30-2011 10:12 AM

When we did we start recommending standard trim enamel on a surface to be walked on? Did I miss a memo? lol I suggest a porch and floor enamel.

LidoGirl 11-30-2011 10:26 AM

thanks Mazey, I actually took the runner off the stairs because it was hard to keep clean and the wood treads looked so beat up. I might have to consider adding it back if the paint doesnt hold up. either that or down the road maybe pay to have nice oak treads put in. For now I want to see what I can do with paint since stain wont work.
jsheriden- That is what I was thinking, I have oil based zinsser cover stain from a previous project, then a porch and floor paint (was thinking behr but if theres something better I'm for it) and then two coats of water based poly. Everyone seems to be saying different things.
so confused!

Windows 11-30-2011 10:50 AM

Use a primer -- use a finish paint that is specifically designed for walking surfaces -- do not put poly over top. (poly adds surface protection to stained surfaces that the stain itself does not provide - if you are using paint, that protection is built in.

joecaption 11-30-2011 10:53 AM

Look a the section about painting stain or sealed kitchen cabinets. This is from the Sherwin Williams web site.
http://www.sherwin-williams.com/do_i...dex.jsp#q19207

ric knows paint 11-30-2011 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LidoGirl (Post 782079)
I've been working on refinishing my staircase for a bit now. Sanded down the old pine treads and tried a dozen stain samples on sample wood I thought was the closest match etc etc. Finally bit the bullet yesterday and went ahead with an espresso stain.....and it looks absolutely horrible. :(

I can't say I wasn't warned. I know pine doesnt absorb stain well and the darker the color the worse it takes, I used a conditioner and everything but even though my samples looked good, the real deal looks very "stripey" and the grain contrasts too much with the rest of the wood. I hate it and want to cry. Anyway. I will not go through the sanding process again (my OCD and lack of patience and motiviation simply will not let me) plus I dont think the stain can just be sanded off. I knew this going in. So I feel I have no other choice at this point then to paint the steps. I don't really love the look of painted stairs, especially on the main floor but I'm out of ideas. My question is....can I use a latex paint over these steps that were stained yesterday? I'd prefer not to prime, I'd like to limit the layers of paint I put on. But I should start listening to those who know better, so I will if I have to. Also, I already purchased Oil based floor polyurethane, can I use this over the latex paint to protect it? or should I get a water based? If anyone has any advice I would really really appreciate it. I'd like to get this done before the weekend also....seeing as the holidays are around the corner and I have obligations piling up there also. Thanks soooo much!!

Jen

Hi Jen,

Before you paint, consider this - if that oil stain was just applied yesterday, you could probably alter the stain's appearance by scrubbing with a scuff pad and mineral spirits. If you lighten it up sufficiently enough to lessen the contrast between the grains, and still want the "natural" wood appearance, there are varnish stains (colored varnishes) that may work for you. If you go that route, make sure the varnish is intended for floors, and it's always a good idea to coat over varnish stains with 1 or 2 clear coats of the same type of varnish. If you can find an acrylic poly (water-borne, but not water-reducible alkyd poly), that is suitable for floors, they won't yellow like their oil counter-parts. Good Luck.

jsheridan 11-30-2011 10:58 AM

I can't speak to Behr floor enamel. I prefer Ben Moore's products, either of which would make a poly topcoat unnecessary. Most floor products wouldn't require a poly topcoat, as they're designed to take abuse. BM latex p&f enamel is epoxy modified, but only comes in satin, which is less of a slip hazard. The oil is urethane modified, but is a gloss. The oil product is formulated to be self priming on bare surfaces, while the latex requires priming. Many p&f enamels are self priming. I would inquire at the paint store as to your particular situation and the products available. A cured stain surface may be considered primed for your purposes, necessitating only two coats. And if you go quality, you'll have more peace of mind that the finish will be durable. Good Luck.
Joe

LidoGirl 11-30-2011 11:07 AM

Thanks, I will look into the BM porch and floor paint tomorrow. Saves me a lot of time if I don't have to poly....good news.

Ric- I do want the natural wood appearance...what can you tell me about colored varnish? Can I get a dark dark brown? Where would I find such a thing?

ric knows paint 11-30-2011 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LidoGirl (Post 782203)
Thanks, I will look into the BM porch and floor paint tomorrow. Saves me a lot of time if I don't have to poly....good news.

Ric- I do want the natural wood appearance...what can you tell me about colored varnish? Can I get a dark dark brown? Where would I find such a thing?

If you can find 'em, you're usually pretty limited in a color selection, however most companies made them in a dark walnut brown color that might work for you...I know Minwax used to make a product called PolyShades, in both an alkyd and acrylic, but I don't know if it's still available and if this was suitable as a floor varnish. Varnish stains are not as popular as they once were, and were typically made in conventional alkyd varnishes (as opposed to polys) - so you might have to call around and see if any is available to you locally. Also, talk to your local paint store about possibly mixing your own varnish stain.

joecaption 11-30-2011 01:14 PM

I've tryed the Poly Shade twice, both times it just would not soak into some areas and would just pool up. It's also not a finish that's going to last on stair treads.
http://www.minwax.com/wood-products/...FQM75Qod9h-QqA
Try looking around on this Min Wax sight for some advice. There the experts.

Brushjockey 11-30-2011 01:23 PM

This isn't so much DIY- but I do make my own tinted varnish often- either by adding regular tint or a bit of stain into it (oils).
Since you used such a dark stain to begin with, I think the hardest thing will be reducing that back. But because you preconditioned- that will help .
I suggest you work on one stair- see how far back you can take it, and then post a couple of pics.
That is if you don't go the paint route. I stand corrected ( again! dang!) about using the floor paint. I often paint the risers and skirts and have the steps themselves be a varnished finish. (Another thing to consider).


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