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Old 02-18-2012, 08:06 AM   #1
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Brush selection for Laquer topcoat on wood trimwork


I'm using Watco Satin laquer finish on my door casing and trimwork. I purchased a Minwax brand polyurethane brush that stated on the packaging that it was good for oil based finishes. Problem is that I am picking bristles out of my finish. I precleaned the brush in laquer thinner as directed on the packaging before use, and fanned it to look for loose bristles first. I called Minwax and was told them my experience. They sent me another brush and told me that the laquer was "very agressive" and not suted for it, but they also couldn't tell me the right brush to use either. I'm planning on returning the original brush to where I purchased it and getting a Purdy brush instead. I really like my Purdy cub that I use for cuttin-in when painting.

Any sugesstions on the best bristle selection for this purpose? The laquer levels out nice and I know that I don't want to tip off since its fast drying. So maybe a stiffer bristle would work good here. Maybe Ox-hair or White china bristle? Any sugesstions?

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Old 02-18-2012, 08:15 AM   #2
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Brush selection for Laquer topcoat on wood trimwork


A natural hair would work the best.
http://www.purdy.com/selector

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Last edited by joecaption; 02-18-2012 at 08:18 AM.
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:06 PM   #3
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Brush selection for Laquer topcoat on wood trimwork


Lacquer dries extremely fast. Any reason you chose to brush it on? Are you able or do you have the option to spray it on?
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:57 PM   #4
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Brush selection for Laquer topcoat on wood trimwork


Quote:
Originally Posted by BraniksPainting View Post
Lacquer dries extremely fast. Any reason you chose to brush it on? Are you able or do you have the option to spray it on?
Spraying is an option which I may look at the next time. With outside / garage temperatures in the 20-30's I decided to finish this project in the basement. This particular project was only 16' of base board and 5 pieces of door casing plus 1 door.

I have never worked with lacquer before, but I'm pleased with the results. And yes, fast drying is right. Covering a door with a 2" brush got me to move a little faster than I expected to.
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Old 02-18-2012, 01:37 PM   #5
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Brush selection for Laquer topcoat on wood trimwork


Quote:
Originally Posted by crankcase View Post
I'm using Watco Satin laquer finish on my door casing and trimwork. I purchased a Minwax brand polyurethane brush that stated on the packaging that it was good for oil based finishes. Problem is that I am picking bristles out of my finish. I precleaned the brush in laquer thinner as directed on the packaging before use, and fanned it to look for loose bristles first. I called Minwax and was told them my experience. They sent me another brush and told me that the laquer was "very agressive" and not suted for it, but they also couldn't tell me the right brush to use either. I'm planning on returning the original brush to where I purchased it and getting a Purdy brush instead. I really like my Purdy cub that I use for cuttin-in when painting.

Any sugesstions on the best bristle selection for this purpose? The laquer levels out nice and I know that I don't want to tip off since its fast drying. So maybe a stiffer bristle would work good here. Maybe Ox-hair or White china bristle? Any sugesstions?
Hey Crank...

A good quality White China (or black) bristle is fine for brushing lacquers - I don't think you'd realize any difference by using ox-hair instead, certainly not enough to warrant the extra cost. Might want to stay away from inexpensive chip brushes, though. Keep in mind that all bristle brushes, regardless of quality, will lose some bristles - obviously, brush out what you can on a scrap board before starting a project, but you're still gonna shed a few along the way.

If the brush manufacturer said to rinse the brush with lacquer thinner prior to use (seems kind of extreme, though), then there's nothing in the lacquer that'd be "too aggressive" - especially in a brushing lacquer. As far as compatibility, the only caveat is to make sure the oil stain has thoroughly dried before applying lacquer over it...don't over brush it (but you already know that), apply as you did before and let the lacquer do all the work - usually flows out beautiful.
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