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Old 12-04-2011, 06:03 PM   #1
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BM Advance


Just starting the process of painting all of our stained and poly'd wood trim and doors. I originally finished all this trim myself when we built 15 years ago...and Yes, my hubby thinks I am crazy. So painting trim is new to me. I have done all the painting in this house inside and out. Have used ben moore's for most of it. Had a moment couple years ago and bought behr. That being said, I have no problem in tackling this job.

Am using the BM Advance in Mascarpone. Have cleaned, sanded, puttied, primed, caulked, and am now ready to pain.

As all diy'ers know, you don't want to spend time and money and have your project fall short of your expectations. Advice will be sooo appreciated.

Which brush would be best for this Advance?
Natural bristle or nylon/poly?
Wooster, Purdy, BM or Corona

What is best for wiping in between sandings?
Plan on vacuuming dust, I want to wipe and do not like tack cloths.
Used denatured alcohol on poly apps.

I hope this doesn't sound too goofy!

Christy

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Old 12-04-2011, 07:30 PM   #2
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First- I would use a high adhesion primer aas a bridge coat from the poly to advance. Advance is a great ptoduct- but a primer made to bond will do it better.
Zin 123, Smart Prime, oil cover stain, even Bin are all used for this.
Poly should not dust up too much- you are only needing to break up the gloss.
I like Wooster Alphas, but brush is really a style and preference choice.
Do not use natural - handles like a waterborne.

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Old 12-05-2011, 04:01 AM   #3
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Oh gee...I already primed with Fresh Start. I roughed up the surface and cleaned well, I hope that it will bond well.

I was trying to find the best way to get it dust free after I sand between paint coats. Will vacuum but what is best to wipe it down?

So basically a good quality nylon/poly brush.

Also will be doing the 6 panel doors. Have practiced methods and have found the best for me is to roll and back brush.

What kind of mini roller cover would be best for that? Used couple different kinds, sponge actually has worked best, but am thinking that I need a mohair or velour.

Advance looks and feels great, just hope it performs as good as it looks!

Last edited by justmom; 12-05-2011 at 04:10 AM. Reason: forgot a question
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Old 12-05-2011, 06:47 AM   #4
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Hey mom, you have a fairly good grip on the lingo, been at this for awhile, huh?
Fresh start, check.
Synthetic brush, check.
Mohair/velour cover, check. (I've never been a fan of sponge rollers. Actually, if you've textured six panels, as opposed to smooth, you may not need to backbrush. The door texture will absorb the fine texture of a mohair. Try it on a door that is less visible. Brush out the bevels and roll the flats. Not trying to cut corners, but the less you have to backbrush, the less chance of problems.)
Dust off the doors after sanding, check. (I rarely use anything more than a duster to dust off after sanding, and my surfaces always come out smooth and clean.)
Sounds like you have a plan.
Good Luck.
Joe
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Old 12-05-2011, 07:16 AM   #5
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Joe...thanks for the advice.

The panel doors are solid pine wood, so no texture. I will play with it on a door we are replacing.

Also, should I also be caulking some of the inside bevels?

Why didn't I find this site years ago! Would have saved me some headaches.

Christy
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Old 12-05-2011, 07:31 AM   #6
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Christy, so you have old doors. As to caulking the panels, that's a situational thing. Those panels are not fixed inside the frame, and as such "float", purposely. The problem with caulking them is that the movement, if there's a lot due to your environmental conditions, the expansion and contraction will distort the caulk over time and look nasty. I try to fill the gaps with paint and evaluate them after the first coat. If it doesn't seem like the second coat will fill them, I'll sparingly caulk. But, that's me.
The chatroom is a great resource isn't it? I'm glad I found because it's rewarding for me as well.

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