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Old 09-10-2010, 08:15 AM   #1
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Bathroom paint


Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum here but have a few questions. First I am not an expert by any means of the word but I try to do all my own house work. 1.) I learn from doing my own work and 2.) Many times its cheaper.
Now on to my problem. My bathroom is in disarray. It does not have an exhaust fan and its small. It has one window. There is mildew on the ceiling, the people who painted it before didn't care about the look of it much less how it performed so now its up to me to undo what they did. I know the lack of exhaust fan and small bathroom is a large contributor to the milder but I can do nothing about that right now as I don't have the knowledge to install one nor the money to have one installed. In one corner of the ceiling there is no paint, (from what I can tell,) it looks like just drywall that has been sanded to the plaster. I know you all don't like behr, I don't blame you as I don't either...even though I just painted my bedroom in behr Since I already have mildew on the ceilings should I go with an oil based primer/paint or should I do that anyway? I looked through the forum and saw some people mention zeenger 1.2.3 or something like that. Is that still a respectable brand? As well, what about the walls? Do I go with the same type of paint and just have it tented to what color I want or is there another type I need for the walls?
Sorry for all the questions but thanks for the help.

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Old 09-10-2010, 09:08 AM   #2
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Bathroom paint


First you have to clean your mold problem. The best cleaner for small amounts of surface mold is ordinary household detergent. Simply wash, and dry the area thoroughly. It's a good idea to check the area the next day because very fine particles can remain as mold dust, which is every bit as harmful as the original mold was. If it's clean, but still stained, you can paint over it with a good oil paint.

If the mold has grown unchecked for awhile, it may have caused more extensive damage to your home than surface mold can cause. Cellulose is one of mold's favorite foods, and that means it likes drywall. Mold that's underneath the drywall's surface may have to be replaced. There's always a reason why that mold grew where it did in the first place. So, cleaning alone may not get rid of your mold problem for good. Remember that mold needs three elements to survive: oxygen, a food source and water. And that means that if you have or had mold in your home, most likely there is or has been a water leak nearby. A pipe may be leaking. Your roof or window sills may be letting some moisture in.

Your house mold's moisture source must be fixed first. Otherwise the mold will simply grow back and as for covering the stain/mold area you can use one of the following brands of sealers: Zinsser, Bin or Kilz

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Old 09-10-2010, 10:34 AM   #3
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Bathroom paint


Yep, what epson said, but I'll add that since cost is obviously a factor to you right now Zinsser PermaWhite would be your most economical and effective solution. After proper cleaning and prep, of course. Just follow the directions.
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Old 09-10-2010, 11:20 AM   #4
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Bathroom paint


You don't say where you live, but if you are in an area with a lot of rain and/or a lot of humidity, and there is a shower in the bathroom in question, that is enough in an unventilated area to promote a mildew problem.

I have always had success treating mold with a 10% bleach solution. I would thoroughly clean the walls and tiles with the solution, send the shower curtain through the laundry (with bleach), and allow things to dry. Give the walls a light sanding and prime and paint them. Use a mildew resistant paint with some sheen to aid with future cleaning.

Beyond that you will want to install a exhaust fan as soon as you are able, but until then I would try to use the window to ventilate the bathroom as much as practicable.
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Old 09-10-2010, 06:52 PM   #5
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Thanks for all the information. I will take care of that mold problem ASAP. Zinsser PermaWhite sounds like what I will be using and if there is a residew left over I will go with an oil base. Thanks again. I'm sure I will have more questions about many other things.
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Old 09-11-2010, 03:55 AM   #6
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Bathroom paint


microban is one of the best things you can use on mold but bleach water is also effective. once that's done, prime and paint. using a satin/semi gloss in the bathroom also isn't a bad idea since they tend to scrub easier than flats
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:19 AM   #7
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To remove the mould I would use an oil of Cloves, bleach will only whiten the mould spoures and not kill them, using oil of cloves actual kills them, it is available at most chemists, once the spoures are killed then use a bleach mix or detergent, any areas that are dark stained and do not clean up to a reasonable level, apply an oil based sealer and leave for 24 hours before applying your acrylic top coats, you can also get a anti mould additive that you can add to the acrylic paint if you want which will help it resist future mould.
Hope this is of help
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Old 09-11-2010, 01:40 PM   #8
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Bleach can be effective as a mold killer, but after a little more research, it is now recommended only for non-porous surfaces, like glass and tile. Bleach will destroy mold structures on porous substrates like walls, but is not able to penetrate and destroy the 'roots', and the mold grows back. I did not know that.
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:08 PM   #9
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Bathroom paint


bleach is wonderful at killing mold and spores... but as stated above, it won't work on porous surfaces.

As much as you would like to clean-up the bathroom, I personally think there's not much to do other than bleach and clean until a fan can be installed. any serious investment that you would make right now would be lost by subsequent mold growth due to moisture.......

As someone who loves to learn new skills, I recommend that you go onto youtube and search this forum to find out how you can install a fan yourself It might be affordable enough for you to if labor costs are free......
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Old 09-12-2010, 04:00 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windows View Post
Bleach can be effective as a mold killer, but after a little more research, it is now recommended only for non-porous surfaces, like glass and tile. Bleach will destroy mold structures on porous substrates like walls, but is not able to penetrate and destroy the 'roots', and the mold grows back. I did not know that.
it's why we have to use microban on flood jobs. i'm not sure how solid the bleach and grow back evidence is. i mean, i had done it for years when i encountered it but it's not as good as a real microbicide. microban costs around $30 a gallon and a gallon will last the average home owner a long ass time.
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Old 09-12-2010, 05:51 AM   #11
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Bathroom paint


do yourself a favor, install the exhaust fan, don't just put a "bandaid" on it... you'll spend more money doing it all 2-times.

Buy a $100 fan, rent a hole saw, cut through the outside wall if possible. Easy.
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Old 09-20-2010, 11:11 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by racebum View Post
it's why we have to use microban on flood jobs. i'm not sure how solid the bleach and grow back evidence is. i mean, i had done it for years when i encountered it but it's not as good as a real microbicide. microban costs around $30 a gallon and a gallon will last the average home owner a long ass time.
can you buy the microban at home depot,etc?

also, i am thinking about painting over the existing ceiling in my bathroom. what finish is best to prevent moisture build up- satin or gloss? and how do you mix in the mildew additive? thanks for any input

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