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-   -   Applying Drywall Compound To Sheetrock (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/applying-drywall-compound-sheetrock-20348/)

shapeshifter 04-26-2008 03:55 PM

Applying Drywall Compound To Sheetrock
 
I've been of the boards for a while now, but a while back, I posted a question regarding applying drywall compound over sheet rock that had been covered in wallpaper. I'm hand-troweling it, trying to achieve a bit of a Venetian plaster effect. I just finished a hallway that is not often used and not brightly lit, so I don't think my boo-boos will be that noticeable.

However, having actually gotten into the process, some other questions have arisen. [I've opted to use the pre-mixed compound.]

Do I want to have a fairly moist mixture? Or does that depend on the weather conditions?

Should I start troweling at the top by the ceiling and work down, or at the bottom by the molding and work up?

What's the best technique to use when moving down the wall from a finished area to a new spot.

Do I move the trowel in more or less straight lines or in great big arcs?

Sorry to have posted so much at once.:)

joewho 04-27-2008 01:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shapeshifter (Post 119260)
I've been of the boards for a while now, but a while back, I posted a question regarding applying drywall compound over sheet rock that had been covered in wallpaper. I'm hand-troweling it, trying to achieve a bit of a Venetian plaster effect. I just finished a hallway that is not often used and not brightly lit, so I don't think my boo-boos will be that noticeable.

However, having actually gotten into the process, some other questions have arisen. [I've opted to use the pre-mixed compound.]

Do I want to have a fairly moist mixture? In your situation, yes. You mentioned venetian plaster, but it sounds like it's just coming out that way. If you were to go for real venetian plaster, there are some short, dry strokes involved.

Or does that depend on the weather conditions? Weather conditions will determine the amount of working time. If there's little humidity then the working time will be less. More humidity means more working time. Having a "wet" mix will also increase working time.

Should I start troweling at the top by the ceiling and work down, or at the bottom by the molding and work up?

What's the best technique to use when moving down the wall from a finished area to a new spot.

Do I move the trowel in more or less straight lines or in great big arcs?
I could guess at these, but why don't you check out a drywall or plaster forum. They specialize in this area and are more able to steer you in the right direction..........

Sorry to have posted so much at once.:)


...........

shapeshifter 04-27-2008 02:29 PM

Sorry Joe, if you posted a reply it did not come through.

Day 2: On yesterday's project, I went back with a thinner mix and covered the spots that were missed, leveled out the craters and splotches and added a little texture that I can burnish tomorrow.

On today's new portion, we again used a thinner mix and troweled on a very thin coat. Tomorrow, I will go back over and even things out and add some of the texture that can be burnished.

It really isn't that complicated, just a little labor intensive but I think I like what it will be after it's primed and painted.

Sir MixAlot 04-27-2008 10:06 PM

If you could take a few pictures and post them that would be great.

slickshift 04-27-2008 10:34 PM

Did you prime the wall covering before applying the mud?

shapeshifter 04-27-2008 11:15 PM

:( Noooo I didn't. Isn't drywall mud usually applied to the unprimed drywall? We will prime before we paint, however.

slickshift 04-28-2008 08:58 AM

Had the wall paper been removed?
All the adhesive also?

For new construction mud is usually applied over uncoated sheetrock
For repairs or things like skim coating after wall covering removal, it's best to prime first
Those are special circumstances

shapeshifter 04-28-2008 11:21 AM

Ewwwww:censored:

Yes we removed all the wallpaper and cleaned off the remaining adhesive. Looks like they only used the adhesive at the seams.

slickshift 04-28-2008 11:38 AM

Stripped and real clean you should be OK

But really, for anyone else reading this, or for yourself the next time you do this (...if there is a next time), it's best to sand and prime something like this before mudding
Whether it's just small repairs or a full skim/texture

Good luck with your plaster effect

joewho 04-29-2008 04:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shapeshifter (Post 119451)
Sorry Joe, if you posted a reply it did not come through.

.

The answers are in your quote. It wouldn't post that way, so I had to ........ for it to post.


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