Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-23-2009, 02:34 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 2
Share |
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


I want to scrape the popcorn ceiling off my kitchen and laundry room ceilings. After reading the threads in this forum, I think I'm dead in the water!
After painting the living and dining room ceilings with a roller, I resolved never to do that again. I can see places where it is heavier than others. I hate it. Being 75 yrs old, it took every ounce of energy to get it painted. I had a painter all set up to come and spray the ceilings but the day he was to arrive (after I got all the furniture moved to the center of the room, covered and everything else masked off) he broke a couple of his fingers loading his spray equipment in his truck and couldn't come. So I was stuck. I wasn't about to tear down everything and go through the exercise of finding another painter.
I didn't want to go through that in the kitchen. How come some people get big chunks of the popcorn stuff coming off when they try to paint by roller and when I WANT it to come off it is a big problem?. My kitchen is so small, it would not be worth a painter's time and effort to come and spray these ceilings. Just masking off the cabinets, ceiling fan, floors etc would be a job in itself. Being on Soc Sec. only, I can't afford a $400-500 paint bill.

I tried spraying with water the ceiling above the washer and scraping it but only a little bit of the plaster stuff came off leaving it a kind of texture look. But I only tried it with a little hand sprayer. If I used a 2 gal tank sprayer and got it really wet, would it come off easier? Or am I dreaming to think I could do this myself?
My kitchen is about 8 X 14 and the laundry room is about 8 X 8.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Astrovel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2009, 09:37 PM   #2
Member
 
Matthewt1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,766
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


A flat blade shovel usually does the trick with popcorn.

Matthewt1970 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2010, 04:53 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


Hi, I'm a new member. I Googled and ran into this chatroom because of my popcorn ceiling challenge. (My house was build in 1979.)

Maybe somebody has experimented this, but I have not seen any post using this method to remove popcorn ceiling:

I was told by a Home Depot associate that we could use "Power Steamer" instead of chisel. This "Power Steamer" small tool is sold in the Paint Department at Home Depot, costs about US$50, and was mainly used for removing wall-paper. The associate assured me that IT WORKED.

I'd appreciate any feedback regarding your experience with this method.

Handy Ladybug
HandyLadybug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2010, 07:21 PM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 11
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


Keep in mind, from all I've read at this forum and other places, popcorn ceilings can contain asbestos.
JerMann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 11:19 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ontario Canada, Toronto to be exact.
Posts: 1,373
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


You keep scraping until you've removed nearly all the texture and the entire ceiling is as smooth as scraping can achieve. (If you ever painted over the popcorn it will be more difficult to remove). After all the popcorn is removed sand the entire area with medium-grit drywall sandpaper. (You can buy or rent a sanding pad attached to a long pole. This allows you to work while standing on the floor). After the medium grit sanding give the ceiling a second sanding with a fine-grit drywall sand paper. Inspect the ceiling closely and if you find gouges or other rough spots, you'll need to fill them in with drywall joint compound, allow them to dry, and sand the area again. Once this is all done you can prime and then paint with your finish coat.

As mentioned, use water to saturate the popcorn so when you scrap it off it will just peel off
epson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 11:39 AM   #6
Member
 
steveel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 287
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


If you thought overhead painting with a roller was bad I wouldn't try it.

BTW, did you do two coats, applying the paint in straight lines, going perpindicular to each coat? I'm no expert. I've only done it once and that's what my wife said to do. It seemed to work because it was uniform when we were done.

Popcorn can DEFINITELY contain asbestos. I scraped a piece and took it to an enviro-lab for scientific testing and it was positive. If I ever have a textured ceiling to mess with again, I play to just cover it up with new panels. It will be encapsulated, with minimal disturbance, and best of all upon sale of the home I will be able to check the box "unknown" when the disclosure form asks about known asbestos hazarards.

SteveEl
steveel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 11:44 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


Quote:
Originally Posted by steveel View Post
Popcorn can DEFINITELY contain asbestos. I scraped a piece and took it to an enviro-lab for scientific testing and it was positive. If I ever have a textured ceiling to mess with again, I play to just cover it up with new panels. It will be encapsulated, with minimal disturbance, and best of all upon sale of the home I will be able to check the box "unknown" when the disclosure form asks about known asbestos hazarards.

SteveEl
If you check "unknown" then you would be making a false statement
Since you had it tested, know it contains asbestos & covered it up
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 01:25 PM   #8
Member
 
steveel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 287
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


read it again, Scuba.... I said that's what I plan to do NEXT time I run into a problem textured ceiling. Since next time I will not have it tested but will instead encapsulate the ceiling in place, "unknown" will be true. Whether that approach is ethical is open to debate, which I am not interested in doing in this forum.
steveel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 01:30 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


Ah...Ok...missed that
I'm not sure what the wife had tested before we bought this house
I know radon was one
Not sure about paint - lead
How do you test every painted surface ?
And how do you test the painted shingles under the vinyl siding ?
Having worked in an Industrial shop when I was younger I just treat everything as dangerous
Drink enough soda & can kill you

We haven't had anything tested since we bought the house
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2010, 12:52 PM   #10
Newbie
 
Learn2Build's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 26
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


Have the ceilings been painted before, because if they have I can't imagine that water will be that effective. Also, to clarify you are dealing with plastered ceilings and not drywall, right?
Learn2Build is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2010, 08:36 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ontario Canada, Toronto to be exact.
Posts: 1,373
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


[quote=Scuba_Dave;501617]
How do you test every painted surface ?

You would purchase a lead test kit at the local hardware store and then you would clean the surface of the paint to be tested with a household cleaner. When cleaning the surface be sure to dry it very well after using the household cleaner so as not to contaminate the chemical in the test kit and possibly resulting in a false reading. Then with a small knife you would cut a small V-shaped notch in the paint surface to expose all layers of paint try to do this in an inconspicuous place that will not be seen. If the paint is red or pink, rub the surface of the paint with a towel that has been dampened with a small amount of vinegar. Rub for about 30 seconds and then examine the cloth. If the towel shows a pink or red color then use the alternate test for lead paint that is included in the test kit.
Activate the test swab by first pinching the swab stick at the point indicated in the instructions to break the small vials inside and shake and squeeze the swab stick to mix the chemical inside thoroughly. These two chemicals are non-hazardous, but must be mixed well to indicate lead. Now rub the swab on the surface to be tested for about 30 seconds and examine the swab end of the tester for any color change. If the swab tip or surface changes to a pink or red color, there is lead in the paint.
epson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2010, 09:48 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


I know the are test kits
My point is I have 50+ windows in the house
Baseboard trim,ceiling trim, chair rail
Walls in every room, paint in the basement, outside foundation, pool cabana
Its simply not practical to me to try to determine which of these have lead
Or to test every single surface
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2010, 01:25 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ontario Canada, Toronto to be exact.
Posts: 1,373
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
I know the are test kits
My point is I have 50+ windows in the house
Baseboard trim,ceiling trim, chair rail
Walls in every room, paint in the basement, outside foundation, pool cabana
Its simply not practical to me to try to determine which of these have lead
Or to test every single surface
Well then you can paint over all existing surfaces with several coats of non-leaded paint, or special paints designed to cover lead paint (called encapsulating paints). Or you can put up wallpaper or use paneling to cover up the painted surfaces.
These are the easiest things to do...
epson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2010, 02:48 PM   #14
Member
 
steveel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 287
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


Enviro testing labs often have a lead-test service, where they bring in a handheld gizmo based on xrayflourescence or something like that (not sure how it is spelled). Never done it myself, but I inquired once.

But then the OP was about popcorn ceilings. There is no DIY testing kit for asbestos.

SteveEl
steveel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2010, 04:20 PM   #15
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 4
Default

Another popcorn ceiling question! HOW?


There are several other answers at diy.stackexchange.com:

http://diy.stackexchange.com/questio...om-the-ceiling

doresoom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Got Dark Paint on Flat white popcorn ceiling DIYAmatureLeah Painting 6 01-22-2013 06:10 PM
Popcorn ceiling Barry J Painting 3 04-10-2009 07:29 PM
Popcorn ceiling removal and retexturing lexter_wolf General DIY Discussions 2 05-09-2008 05:51 PM
Pot lights in a drop ceiling Howdy Electrical 3 03-14-2008 08:23 PM
Question about popcorn ceiling J187 Building & Construction 4 06-30-2006 01:33 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.