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shapeshifter 02-27-2007 11:11 AM

Another Paint Question
 
The oak veneer cabinets in the guest bath are not in good shape and I'm thinking I will paint these instead of re-staining and poly-coating.

Would it be a good idea to use an alkyd high gloss paint?

If not what would be best?

What kind of clear coat would I need to use, if any?

What type of prep and priming would be best for painting oak veneer?

:)

joewho 02-27-2007 12:24 PM

Alkyd paint will work just fine. The level of gloss is up to you.

You'll need to sand thoroughly and prime with an alkyd primer.

Clear Coat won't be necessary.

Apply several very thin coats and allow to dry really well in between.

Keep a container of mineral spirits nearby. As the brush starts to get gummy, just jam the brush up and down a few times and spin it out.

This will keep things going smoothly until you're finished and then clean the brush properly.

Hope this helps.

shapeshifter 02-27-2007 03:36 PM

Thank you so much for the tips.

On another note, is there anyway that a ceiling can be painted to give the impression of a tray ceiling? If so, how does one go about it?

joewho 02-27-2007 10:59 PM

You keep the fourm interesting, shapeshifter.

AtlanticWBConst. 02-28-2007 05:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shapeshifter (Post 34967)
Thank you so much for the tips.

On another note, is there anyway that a ceiling can be painted to give the impression of a tray ceiling? If so, how does one go about it?

Wow, no that's a different thing to try.....

shapeshifter 02-28-2007 09:53 AM

I might just give it a try. All I have to lose is a couple hours' work and couple of $$ in paint.

PS, do I post too much?

:eek:

joewho 02-28-2007 01:10 PM

It would be hard to get the depth of a tray ceiling without being outright artistic.

You could do a square on the ceiling by measuring in from the walls 2 or 3 feet. The color should be a couple shades darker that the ceiling paint. For an even more dramatic look, you could then paint another square inside the first one, a little lighter color, and leave a 1 foot border of the darker.

Hope that helps a little bit.

You do not post too much. I was serious, you do make this forum interesting.

shapeshifter 02-28-2007 05:29 PM

I was also thinking along those lines, no pun intended :laughing:

The other thing I was thinking about was bringing the ceiling color down onto the walls about 4" and installing some sort of molding, also the same color.

Starting from where the ceiling meets the wall going towards the center of the ceiling, would it be a dark shade, then a medium shade with maybe a white in the very center?

slickshift 02-28-2007 05:56 PM

The Ideal Cabinet Repaint:

Clean with ammonia/water solution
Let dry

Sand with 180
This is to "rough up" the surface, not sand it off
Wipe with Tack Cloth

Prime with a white-pigmented shellac based primer*
(Use a disposable brush and take precautions
Plenty of fresh air and a respirator are good ideas when working with shellac)
Let dry

Sand with 180
This is a light sanding to smooth out the shellac a bit
Wipe with tack cloth

Paint first coat, using a good quality oil-based enamel, or a quality waterborne enamel, using the a good quality proper type brush (oil/water-based prefer different kinds of brushes)
Let dry over night

Lightly sand with 220
Wipe with tack cloth

Second coat quality oil based enamel, or a quality waterborne enamel, also with a proper brush

Enjoy beautiful cabinets
…and the long-lasting durable finish you applied yourself

*If the cabinets are in good shape, and not too dark, a quality oil-based (alkyd) primer may be used for priming (and TSP for cleaning)
I suggest a shellac because it works on just about any surface, dark, light, wood, laminate, bare wood, stained wood, polyurethane-ed wood, pickled wood, previously oil-based or latex painted wood, and even the questionable surfaces like inexpensive “paper” laminates if the surface is prepped and the shellac applied carefully
It’s also your best bet for plastic or melamine type surfaces

If the cabinets are known to have a quality, properly adhering, latex or waterborne finish in good shape, the primer step could be skipped if the surface was scuff sanded well-but it would still be better to do the step and use a quality water based enamel undercoating as a primer.

shapeshifter 02-28-2007 07:57 PM

Wow, Slick, thanks so much for the detail.

These bathroom cabinets have the same oak veneer that ya'll helped me with a few weeks ago. I just sanded, re-stained and poly-coated that bathroom cabinet and it just glows! Hubby is very happy so I am happy, too lol.

However, now I'm starting work on MY bath and it will be a whole 'nuther ball game :laughing:

joewho 02-28-2007 10:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shapeshifter (Post 35100)
I was also thinking along those lines, no pun intended :laughing:

The other thing I was thinking about was bringing the ceiling color down onto the walls about 4" and installing some sort of molding, also the same color.

Starting from where the ceiling meets the wall going towards the center of the ceiling, would it be a dark shade, then a medium shade with maybe a white in the very center?

Your idea sounds better than mine. More like a cap than a tray.

Keep in mind that I've never tried this.
Was thinking of the shadowing effects of a tray ceiling. It would be ceiling white about 2 feet out from the walls, medium color 2 foot band and darker in the center. Or measurments that fit your room.

Different tones of the ceiling paint.


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