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protechplumbing 11-13-2011 06:03 PM

alligator cracking lead based paint in bathroom
 
My ceiling in my bathroom has alligator cracking in the paint. I sanded the paint and found that the source of the cracks is actually the plaster it self. This is a 1963 home in central florida. The wall is 2 layers of drywall with a skim coat of plaster.

My question is this: Can I just scuff the paint and put a new skim coat of plaster on or do I have to scrap/sand all of the paint off before applying a new skim coat? There is at least 2 layers of paint existing. I suspect the base layer is lead based paint and the top layer is latex.

I want this done right so that the new paint will last, but sanding all of this paint is extremely laborious.

No, no children in my home. Yes, I'm wearing an approved respirator and have the room under negative pressure with tarps leading to the work area.

Keep sanding, scuff and skim or something else???

Thanks in advance.

protechplumbing 11-13-2011 06:10 PM

Also, I'm installing an exhaust fan wired to a humidity to address future moisture problems.

jsheridan 11-13-2011 06:32 PM

That's a tough question to answer without seeing the surface. If the plaster is spider cracking, and the paint is mimicking the cracking, it might continue and take your repair with it over time. It could be that the original oil coat, as you say, has become brittle and is failing, which would require removal. If there is flat paint on the ceiling, steam caused failure of flat paint resembles alligatoring. You could have a couple of situations going on there. Since it's only a bath, assuming not a large area, I would consider re-rocking it. When you consider the time involved in your present pursuit, and all the work still ahead, shooting some screws into sheetrock and taping and finishing might seem much easier. That approach will assure success, which repairing won't. Just a thought.
Joe

Brushjockey 11-13-2011 06:34 PM

It would be very unusual if it started with the plaster coat. Alligatering usually is when there are dissimilar coats of paint expanding and contracting at different rates.
My approach would be -
first- make sure it is clean- baths get soaps and stuff easy
if you wash with tsp (sub) you will not have to sand- good thing if its a lead based.
I would then prime with Gardz- a thin clear penetrating sealer. it will creep into all those little cracks and stableize the mess.
Then a light skim, sand that, reprime - maybe with that Gardz again but any good primer/sealer.
Finish with an acrylic eggshell finish in a quality paint.

hope that helps!

( just a p..)

jsheridan 11-13-2011 06:34 PM

So you have moisture issues. I would venture that a lot of what your dealing with is moisture related. Steam will penetrate and cause failure from the inside out.

jsheridan 11-13-2011 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 770456)
It would be very unusual if it started with the plaster coat. Alligatering usually is when there are dissimilar coats of paint expanding and contracting at different rates.
My approach would be -
first- make sure it is clean- baths get soaps and stuff easy
if you wash with tsp (sub) you will not have to sand- good thing if its a lead based.
I would then prime with Gardz- a thin clear penetrating sealer. it will creep into all those little cracks and stableize the mess.
Then a light skim, sand that, reprime - maybe with that Gardz again but any good primer/sealer.
Finish with an acrylic eggshell finish in a quality paint.

hoe that helps!

Hoe, who you calling hoe?:laughing: I sometimes hit the h, which is right next to the j, and sign things hoe.

Brush, that's a good point. How about Peel Bond though, as opposed to Gardz? I didn't think it was alligatoring in the true sense either, but brittle oil will alligator, in addition to temp flucs situation. Anyway, that sounds like a situation where I do the best I can and shoot up a prayer that I don't get a call back in a year.

Brushjockey 11-13-2011 08:14 PM

Peel bond might do it too- just a different approach. Gardz will penetrate- Peel Bond will form a thick flexible coat.
I also think the skim coat puts something that doesn't craze easily in the mix, and the primer on top adds a bit more strength and flex.
There are no garentees with old problems- but I personally would go down this route ( and have many times on jobs) before re rocking.

chrisn 11-14-2011 04:09 AM

I am with brush on this one, sorry Joe:whistling2:

jsheridan 11-14-2011 04:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 770755)
I am with brush on this one, sorry Joe:whistling2:

I agree, no apologies necessary. You beat me to the punch.

chrisn 11-14-2011 06:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 770764)
I agree, no apologies necessary. You beat me to the punch.

Well ,I had my coffee early this morn.:boxing:

oldernow 09-02-2013 01:15 PM

Protechplumping, are you still around?

I am having same issue as your original post. I am in south Florida with an old house too, and the same bathroom issue. What did you end up doing? How did whatever you did hold up?

Oldernow


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