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Old 01-03-2014, 09:41 AM   #16
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Airless sprayer


This thread was helpful to me too (I'm the one with the 6 panel door thread). Having a new house built and I will have a LOT of painting to do as well. Was wondering the order of things.

I went to my Sherwin Williams store and they set me up with a contractor account, brought the price WAY down, worth checking out.

I'm going to have a buttload of masking/dropclothing to do.

If you need to backroll anyways, is it still worth spraying new construction? My entire house will be painted (sprayed I assume) a plain old white color.
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Old 01-03-2014, 10:01 AM   #17
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Airless sprayer


I am usually the one who disagrees with the spraying of new construction. By the time you mask off, set up, tear down, clean, etc. you could be done by using a roller and brush. And, if you don't back roll, spray painted walls look like plastic to me. In addition, you will use a lot more primer and paint.

Usually, it's just me and maybe during the busy season 2 other employees. I get all the dust off the walls and prime them with my roller and brush on day one. Day two, I get all the ceilings. The walls obviously take more time. They get sanded and dust removed, then a first coat of paint. That can take 2 or 3 days depending on colors selected. After that, we wait til the carpet is put in before doing a final coat. Carpet installers usually tear up the walls pretty good so we wait til they're done, fix the walls and apply the final coat. You can't use this process with a sprayer unless you are very, very proficient.

Just another man's way of doing it……….without a sprayer.
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Old 01-03-2014, 10:07 AM   #18
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Airless sprayer


That will probably be the better way to do it for me with the new house. Question -- If you roll the primer and I presume then would already have roller stipple, is it then worth spraying the rest? Or still no?
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Old 01-03-2014, 10:40 AM   #19
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You need to bankroll the final coat. The reason for this is to get the stipple from the roller. You need this because it you ever do a repair or touch-up you would have to spray it to get the same finish. By back rolling and adding the stipple you can use a roller or mini roller to do the repair.
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Old 01-03-2014, 11:00 AM   #20
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Any rolling I have done over the years, and I've done a lot of rolling, leaves very little stipple if you are using high quality paint and your technique is good.

Toolseeker is correct about touch-ups. It's near impossible to touch-up a sprayed on finish.

Just don't be surprised that you won't save as much time as you think you will in spraying. Also, if you don't do it on a daily basis, your hands and shoulders will take as much of a beating as rolling and brushing.
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Old 01-03-2014, 11:05 AM   #21
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Oh OK. I had asked in another thread that having a "well established" wall that's had many coats, if I could just spray the next coat and I believe the answer was yes because the texture is already there. I wasn't sure if that would apply to rolling primer then spraying the top coat. I guess not.
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Old 01-03-2014, 01:05 PM   #22
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Airless sprayer


I would not try to talk anyone into spraying. Since you have sprayers and asked a question about spraying I was trying to help. Have said before my first time I hated it, put it away in garage and was a couple years before I got it back out. Now it is a huge part of my painting tool box. Plus in the past few years as with other things in the industry there have been major improvements. On new const. I really feel I can mask and paint a room before you get set-up and your cut ins done. And I will be the first to admit you must know the limitations of a sprayer, where to use it and where not to use it.
New innovations like FF tips, tip extensions, hand masker, new guns, better more controled pressure settings, all help with the problems of spraying from just a few years ago. Oh and the new sprayers are made to hook up a garden hose turn the water on and pull the trigger when then water runs clear the sprayer and gun are cleaned.
Just painted some ext. doors at the church the other day. Removed the weather stripping, with hand masker about 5 minutes to mask around the door plus top and threshold (used 9" paper instead of plastic) 3 minutes to prime the sprayer, Apprx. 2 minutes to paint the door and trim using a 410FF tip, no overspray on anything and a glass like finish. Another great place is built in cabinets PITA to get a brush or small roller in the corners. Spray using a 210FF tip with 6" tip extension, inside done glass like finish.
Another great innovation is the power roller. Past summer painted a couple houses with deep really rough stucco sprayed the house which gets into the rough spots then back roll. Anyway on the back of these houses was swimming pools so there were 2 glass sliding doors 2 regular doors and a couple windows.Area was so cut up not feasible to spray. Hooked up power roller with 1 1/2" nap roller cover on the end of my spray gun and rolled the whole thing never having to stop to dip, just pull the trigger and more paint to the roller.
All I'm saying is if you have a sprayer and are not using it you are cheating yourself out of a very useful tool. Forget what you have read and heard over the years and try it. Maybe it will still not be for you, but I think the more you use it the more uses you will find for it.
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Old 01-03-2014, 02:50 PM   #23
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Airless sprayer


Great post, Toolseeker. My intentions were not to talk anyone out of spraying, but, in the hands of a novice you and I know it can be the absolute worst tool you can use to do painting………especially new construction where, what you do, will be on the wall for generations to come. Can you imagine runs, fuzz, overspray causing countless problems in a new home? Dave, the OP, may be a proficient DIYer and can quickly tackle the learning curve, but, just in case he isn't………………
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Old 01-03-2014, 03:39 PM   #24
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I'll give my take on using an airless for new construction. There are of course several different approaches to using an airless. I have tried many over the years, and they all have advantages/disadvantages.

The main benefit to using an airless that I see is the speed that you can actually get the paint on the surface. It's a whole lot easier and faster to apply a gallon of paint to a wall with a sprayer, that dipping a roller in a bucket/tray many times.
That does leave out the extra prep, masking, etc that is required to spray. But in a new house these steps are often minimized.

I did a 2,200 sqft new house this fall like this;

1. After all Sheetrock was complete, but before any trim was installed, spray and back roll primer on all ceilings and walls... Sand primer.

2. Spray an back roll all ceilings, not worrying about overspray on the walls (wall paint will cover it). Spray out all closets with ceiling white.

3. Mask ceilings, spray one finish coat on the walls. (I like to shield the ceilings rather than mask but shielding is not a DIY friendly job)

4. Spray a finish coat on all pre primed trim on saw horses before instillation.

5. After trim instillation, fill all nail holes and caulk trim. Remove doors and finish spray in the garage.

6. Hand paint finish coat on all trim. Having the first finish coat sprayed on the trim really helps with the smoothness of the final coat. If you use a good leveling paint, its barely noticeable that the final coat was brushed.

7. Cut in and roll final coat on walls.


If I wanted to spray the trim all coats I would not worry about doing it on the bench the first time. I would also not spray the first finish coat on the walls. After priming I would spray all the trim complete, not worrying about overspray on the walls. Sand the overspray well and the wall paint will cover it.
At that point, you could mask off all the trim and ceilings and spray the walls, but having to do all that masking eats up the time you save by spraying. I would probably just cut and roll the walls in that situation.

Using an airless can make the job of painting a new house way easier. Even if all you spray is the primer and ceilings and hand paint the rest it can save a ton of labor.
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Old 01-03-2014, 04:29 PM   #25
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Airless sprayer


Awesome awesome information.

Jmayspaint, what is the reason to use ceiling white inside closets?

So I don't need to prime over the filled nail holes if I'm doing two finish coats? (regardless of spray or brush)...


I wish I had an empty house to work in instead of a half-packed house with a 3- and 5- year old and wife running around asking for something every 37 seconds. Be a lot easier and flowing. Maybe I could even think.
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Old 01-03-2014, 06:19 PM   #26
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It's pretty common to finish small closets in white. Spraying them as you go with the ceiling paint, gets them done quick and easy.

That's just for small storage closets, walk in closets usually go with the rest of the walls.

As far as the filled nail holes showing, it depends on what you fill them with. Putty or glazing will cover good with one coat, but I'm moving away from using oil fillers with latex. Some spackles like Crack shot, or 3m patch&primer do pretty good with one coat. Joint compound or lightweight spackle will flash through every time and need to be primed.
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Old 01-03-2014, 07:40 PM   #27
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This is what I am using here...not a putty or glazing is it? While we are on the subject, if there's a preferred product, which is it?
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Elmer-s-W...hall%26NCNI-5#

OK small closets, I got it. I was curious if there were issues with it getting dirty easy because it was a flat paint.

This is the trim (and door) paint I'm using:
http://www.sherwin-williams.com/home...oatings/paint/
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Old 01-03-2014, 11:09 PM   #28
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Jmayspaint,
Would you do anything different if the ceilings are any color other than white? In that case, the caulked trim would need to be cut-in on the ceiling as well as the wall. I guess my question is, on the previous post of your steps on the 2200sqft house, what would you have done if the ceiling wasn't white?
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Old 01-04-2014, 08:13 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmayet54
Jmayspaint,
Would you do anything different if the ceilings are any color other than white? In that case, the caulked trim would need to be cut-in on the ceiling as well as the wall. I guess my question is, on the previous post of your steps on the 2200sqft house, what would you have done if the ceiling wasn't white?

A different color on the ceiling wouldn't change anything.
Having crown molding up against a colored ceiling would though. If it was a light color in flat that I thought I could touch up easily, I might do the same and just touch up the ceiling after the crown was caulked, then cut the crown into the ceiling for a finished line.

Having crown up does make it easier to mask off the walls because you have the top edge of the crown to run the tape on. With crown molding, I have done the ceilings last after the crown was finished. Just tape along the top edge where you want the line, drape the walls and spray/roll the ceilings.

Another way is to spray the ceiling finish after the crown is up and caulked but not finished. Then you can overspray on the crown some and then paint the crown back up to the ceiling for a finished line. This avoids having to mask the walls.

If the goal is to spray the trim though, finishing it first and then masking it off, or cutting to it is the way to go.

Last edited by Jmayspaint; 01-04-2014 at 08:23 AM.
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Old 01-04-2014, 09:02 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymschu View Post
Great post, Toolseeker. My intentions were not to talk anyone out of spraying, but, in the hands of a novice you and I know it can be the absolute worst tool you can use to do painting………especially new construction where, what you do, will be on the wall for generations to come. Can you imagine runs, fuzz, overspray causing countless problems in a new home? Dave, the OP, may be a proficient DIYer and can quickly tackle the learning curve, but, just in case he isn't………………
WOW guys I love this thread I feel it is very informative for each other plus the DIY Schu I totally agree with what you said, but in the hands of a complete novice you can end up with pretty much the same problems using a brush roller and pan. The reason I fell N/C is a good place to learn is almost all the problems can be fixed pretty easy and usually just with labor i.e. sanding.
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