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Old 01-26-2012, 02:34 PM   #1
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Aircraft paint stripper


I've learned the hard way not to take advice from everyone, lol.

My interior home trim and cabinets are all oak and I hate the oak. I want to paint the cabinets. Sanding will take a long time. Someone suggested I could use aircraft paint stripper and the coating and stain will come right off. I don't think it sounds like a good idea. Any experience with this?

How bout using the other types of paint/stain remover? A lot claim to take off up to 7 layers in one application. Good or bad idea on oak and do these work in general?

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Old 01-26-2012, 02:41 PM   #2
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Aircraft paint stripper


I think even after stripping, you will still want to sand to give the paint a good surface to adhere. Though I don't have a ton of experience in stripping (only a couple small furniture refinishes), oak has a pretty-deep grain. It would take some work for a complete strip. If you're going to paint anyway, why bother? Just give everything a light sanding, prime, and paint.

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Old 01-26-2012, 03:50 PM   #3
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Aircraft paint stripper


If you are going to paint them, you don't need to strip the old finish off. You just need to prep for good bond.
First clean them well- Dirtex or if you want to also etch them- tsp.
Then a thorough but light sand to dull the finish, and then after wiping dust- apply a good bonding primer.
This could be an oil like Cover Stain or one of the many acrylic bonding primers- Zinsser 123, Smart Prime, M First Coat, SW has one also.
Then 2 coats of a good harder finish- I like BM Aura or Advance.
Cabinet coat from Ace Faron says is great- SW's Pro Classic, Muralo Ultra-
don't skimp ( or go to a box store) for this . It's too much work to use lousy product.

Also be aware that the physical texture of Oak will still show - you won't have a smooth surface like if it were paint grade birch.
I personally like the look- but that is personal preference.
To get it smooth is really alot of work and probably not worth it.
Its hard to make it what it isn't.
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Old 01-26-2012, 04:31 PM   #4
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Aircraft paint stripper


As other posters have said if you are painting you don't need to strip. When priming I would use an oil base primer, as water base primers will usually raise the grain of oak, making it rougher and then you'll have to do a lot of sanding. When painting oak you will not get a perfectly smooth surface unless you fill the grain with a grain filler, which is a paste substance.
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Old 01-26-2012, 04:34 PM   #5
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House- if they already have a finish on them, the primer won't actually touch the wood to raise the grain- shouldn't be a problem.
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Old 01-26-2012, 04:37 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
House- if they already have a finish on them, the primer won't actually touch the wood to raise the grain- shouldn't be a problem.
True, the word oak was sticking in my mind and I'm thinking of raw oak.
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Old 01-26-2012, 06:55 PM   #7
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Aircraft paint stripper


Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeTee View Post
I've learned the hard way not to take advice from everyone, lol.

My interior home trim and cabinets are all oak and I hate the oak. I want to paint the cabinets. Sanding will take a long time. Someone suggested I could use aircraft paint stripper and the coating and stain will come right off. I don't think it sounds like a good idea. Any experience with this?

How bout using the other types of paint/stain remover? A lot claim to take off up to 7 layers in one application. Good or bad idea on oak and do these work in general?
I've used Aircraft Stripper many times. It's wicked stuff. I've never used it on wood, nor would I recommend it.

Last edited by DrHicks; 01-26-2012 at 08:27 PM.
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Old 01-26-2012, 09:58 PM   #8
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Aircraft paint stripper


If you survive the use of the aircraft stripper you will be receiving a life long membership in the Jelly-of-the-month club. Don't do it......listen to the good advice you have been given. Bonding primer is your friend.
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Old 01-26-2012, 10:03 PM   #9
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If you want it flat and less work just buy new doors and drawer fronts and just paint the boxes.
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Old 01-27-2012, 08:41 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by DrHicks View Post
I've used Aircraft Stripper many times. It's wicked stuff. I've never used it on wood, nor would I recommend it.
It is also highly explosive with fumes that are heavier than air and that will float on the floor toward things like water heater and furnace pilot lights. You might want to turn them off if you do this?

If you think you want to strip the cabinets, use an infrared stripper. They are safe, fast and almost fun to work with. They will let you take off layers uponh layers of paint with the tool and a clean drywall blade. There is usually a waiting list for rentals.

You can never strip stain off. You will never get it out of the wood grain.

As mentioned, if you are painting, there is no need for any of this.
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Old 01-27-2012, 08:48 AM   #11
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Aircraft paint stripper


Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeTee View Post
I've learned the hard way not to take advice from everyone, lol.

My interior home trim and cabinets are all oak and I hate the oak. I want to paint the cabinets. Sanding will take a long time. Someone suggested I could use aircraft paint stripper and the coating and stain will come right off. I don't think it sounds like a good idea. Any experience with this?

How bout using the other types of paint/stain remover? A lot claim to take off up to 7 layers in one application. Good or bad idea on oak and do these work in general?
We just finished a mansion in Oakland, PA. The people spent 840 grand for the house and put $1 million in renovations in it. We stripped ever square inch of paint from the woodwork and it took a few applications of stripper. I've never found or used a stripper that takes off 7 layers at a time even though they claim to. It just doesn't seem to work that way. As far as the aircraft paint stripper, it may be too volitile for woodwork, though I can't say for sure. I never used it on woodwork. I know my buddy uses it to strip auto body parts. What we used was Stripeze (do not use the GREEN stuff).
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Old 01-27-2012, 09:20 AM   #12
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Aircraft paint stripper


Thanks for all the info. I have so many cabinets to do (at some point) and want to know what I'm getting into. It sounds like there's no way around the hard work of sanding.

There is a thick layer of wax, and on some oil (like from cooking). Should I sand this off or is there a product to strip the wax?
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Old 01-27-2012, 09:54 AM   #13
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Aircraft paint stripper


I would say scrub with TSP or ammonia to get the greese residue off of it. When I bought my current house, it looked clean - but wasn't. I think they used to make the french fries for all Chicago area McDonald's in my kitchen, there was so much grease and oil built up in the hidden places on top of the cherry cabinets. Used pure Ammonia and a scraper and it worked well enough. You could try sanding it off, but might end up with gunked-up sanding media.

If you truly have a ton of cabinets, get yourself a nice sander that will make the project enjoyable instead of tedious. I also recommend an oscillating tool with a sanding head to get the little nooks and crannies. Cheapo off-brands will work fine, they can be had for about $20.
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Old 01-27-2012, 12:09 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeTee View Post
There is a thick layer of wax, and on some oil (like from cooking). Should I sand this off or is there a product to strip the wax?
Trying to sand wax and grease is just going to clog your paper and melt the wax into a continuing unmanageable mess. TSP will cut the grease. I have been known to use something like Purple Power from the auto store first. There are pros and cons to using such a detergent mix though.

If you have coats of wax on there? I would get some floor wax stripper to get that out of the way.

I think, as suggested, you invest in a nice orbital palm sander this will go much faster than you think!

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