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-   -   Advice on painting wood trim (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/advice-painting-wood-trim-21991/)

Daggerhart 06-08-2008 07:37 PM

Advice on painting wood trim
 
Hello,
My wife and I just bought a new house, and our first renovation project is going to be the repainting of all the interior walls. This isn't too much of an issue, except that all the walls have stained, wood trim. There is a 6-inch wide chair rail in 19x20 living room and 12x12 dining room, and then in all rooms (including previous two), there is a four-inch wooden floor molding, and 4-inch wooden crown molding. I know how to paint walls, as I have painted many, many rooms with my father in his twenty-six years of carpentry and contracting, but I know nothing about these wood-stained trimworks. How do I need to go about painting them?
Thanks!
-Brandon

sirwired 06-08-2008 08:03 PM

Prime with an oil-base primer over the stain, and then topcoat with the quality paint or enamel from a paint store of your choice. Two popular choices here are Waterbourne ProClassic from Sherwin Williams and Waterbourne Impervo from Benjamin Moore. They do a good job of emulating the look of oil-base enamel without all the oil-base hassle and oil-paint yellowing. They are trickier to work with than wall paint, but hold up much better on much-abused trim.

SirWired

Daggerhart 06-08-2008 08:20 PM

Thanks SirWire,
I've heard a lot about Valspar paint from Lowe's, do they have a good high quality oil-base primer, or are the two you mentioned the best to go with? Also, is there no sanding required this way?
-Brandon

slickshift 06-08-2008 08:33 PM

High quality, and paint products @ Lowes, are generally mutually exclusive
I'd suggest a real Paint Store, the products (and advice) are much better

You're project will require sanding
Even if the primer you choose says "no need to sand", do not believe it
In your case, you do

It's OK though, you don't need to go nuts with it
Just a nice light scuff sanding, and then wipe off the dust
Then prime

sirwired 06-08-2008 09:10 PM

A Big Box store is about the worst place to purchase paint. While their paints may "work", you have a much better chance of having an excellent looking job by going to an actual paint store, staffed by people that really know paint, and have been selling it for years as opposed to the teenager that has watched a few hours of training videos at a Big Box.

It may cost a few more dollars per gallon, but that is a lot cheaper than the extra time, effort, and materials you may have to end up spending by buying Big Box paint.

SirWired

Daggerhart 06-09-2008 07:35 AM

Point taken! We have a Sherwin Williams store literally less than five miles from the house, that's where we'll head.

Daggerhart 06-09-2008 08:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slickshift (Post 128843)
High quality, and paint products @ Lowes, are generally mutually exclusive
I'd suggest a real Paint Store, the products (and advice) are much better

I've been doing a bit of looking into this, but I can't find a satisfactory answer. What exactly does it mean for one paint to be a higher quality paint than another? Valspar from Lowe's has high rating in most consumer reports, so I'm just curious why Sherwin Williams is better. Is it just because the store itself will have more knowledgeable experts, or is something product-related?
-Brandon

slickshift 06-09-2008 09:34 PM

Mostly it's Product...but the advice is important too
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Daggerhart (Post 129113)
I've been doing a bit of looking into this, but I can't find a satisfactory answer. What exactly does it mean for one paint to be a higher quality paint than another? Valspar from Lowe's has high rating in most consumer reports, so I'm just curious why Sherwin Williams is better. Is it just because the store itself will have more knowledgeable experts, or is something product-related?
-Brandon

That's a tough one to answer...and keep it short anyway
The bottom line is Consumer Magazines use repeatable lab tests, many of which have very little to do with real world applications
The easy answer is that any quality professional painter would love to be able to save 5 or 10 bucks a gallon...(some buy paint by the pallet btw)...IF they could keep the production rates, (low) failure rates, and quality finish up to their standards
So why don't they shop at Lowes?
They can not keep those quality controls with (most of) the paint products Lowes carries

Now many DIYers have trouble accepting this, but they and the pros have the same goals
Neither one wants to spend two days doing a job that could take 3/4 of a day
Neither one wants it to look crappy
Neither one wants to risk even a small amount of disaster
(...and neither one wants to spend more than they have to on paint)

Pros paint more in one month than just about any DIYer does in their lifetime

Lowes (admittedly) has no desire whatsoever to provide quality paint product to painting professionals
Their goal is to provide reasonably adequate paint products to DIYers who don't know any better

Shop where the pros do...take their advice


For further info on Consumer Reports on this forum, use the search function
There's a few threads addressing this

sirwired 06-10-2008 06:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daggerhart (Post 129113)
I've been doing a bit of looking into this, but I can't find a satisfactory answer. What exactly does it mean for one paint to be a higher quality paint than another? Valspar from Lowe's has high rating in most consumer reports, so I'm just curious why Sherwin Williams is better. Is it just because the store itself will have more knowledgeable experts, or is something product-related?
-Brandon

The problem with the CR testing is that they only can test things that can be easily measured. For instance, hide can be easily measured. However, any fool can come up with a paint that will hide, you just pile in the pigment. The problem with measuring that way is that there are so many things about a paint that you can't just measure with a gauge.

For instance: How easily does it flow off of the roller? How well does it adhere under less than ideal application conditions? Does it dry too quickly in the winter? How well does it apply to unprimed nasty builder paint? Does it level out well? How much of the pigment separates while it sits in the pan? How consistent is it from batch to batch?

All these questions are difficult to develop tests for, so they get left out of the CR ratings.

Believe or not, few to none of us work for paint companies, even if some of us prefer one brand over another. It really does not make a huge difference to a DIY if you buy your top end paint from Sherwin, BM, Kelly Moore, Porter, Duron, California, ICI, etc. But all those paint-store brands carry paint made for painters, not price-focused DIY-paint. And, as you said, they have folks that understand paint.

Some products simply are not even available at Big Box. The Waterbourne enamels that look really great and hold up well on trim and shelving do not even exist at HD/Lowes. Why? They are more difficult to apply, and if you combined them with some $3 cheapo brush, you would have an ugly-rate approaching 100%. A DIY certainly can apply them, but without some advice before hand or some experience, it could be difficult.

Other products, like specialized masonry primers, block fillers, etc. also are not avail. at Big Box.

SirWired


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