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Jackie54 11-15-2012 08:21 AM

2nd coat of stain not drying equally
 
I am refinishing an antique table. Did the stripping and applied the first coat of min-wax stain. It dried completely within 5 hours so I applied a second coat, as per instructions. The second coat is now close to 11 hours and the table isn't completely drying. I realize some sections of the wood might be more porous than others, but, is this uneven drying time normal and is 11 hours a long time for it to dry? Thanks for your help.

joecaption 11-15-2012 08:28 AM

How did you apply the stain?
Did you wipe it down after applying to get rid of the access?
What type wood is it?

Jackie54 11-15-2012 09:09 AM

2nd coat of stain not drying
 
Applied with a paint brush. Wiped off excess with nylons and not really sure what the wood is. Can I wipe off the tacky spots with the nylons again?

joecaption 11-15-2012 09:42 AM

Nylons, never heard of that one.
How is a nylon going to do anything but move the finish around.
Should have been a lint free cloth that would soak up the eccess. An old Tee shirt type material works for me.

Brushjockey 11-15-2012 09:43 AM

Couple of things.
Most of the time stains are meant to do in one application. Often the second one might lift and ruin the first.
Also stains are meant to penetrate ( assuming you are using a straight stain and not stain and finish). But in either case the first coat will seal the surface at least some, so the second lays on top rather than penetrates, making the dry time longer.
And 3rd- whats up with using nylons? they do not absorb anything, just move it around. Lint free staining rags are what are normally used.

Jackie54 11-15-2012 10:07 AM

2nd coat of stain not drying equally
 
Nylons worked the first time around. Remember my dad using them but maybe he was applying the stain. He died in 1989 and I'm working off some old notes he left me. Guess there's nothing I can do now but just wait....don't want to restart this project. Next time, if there is one, will remember to use a t-shirt. Thanks for your comments. Also remember him sometimes applying 7 coats of varnish and using extra fine steel wool to sand in between, this really protected items, guess that's why the hutch is still in tiptop shape after 35 years. How many coats of varnish do you recommend?

Brushjockey 11-15-2012 11:01 AM

Products have radically changed since 1989.
Let us know what exactly the stain is that you are using, and what varnish you are using. That might help what we can say about it.

Jackie54 11-15-2012 11:20 AM

2nd coat of stain not drying equally
 
The stain is Minwax Wood Finish - Early American and the varnish is Varathan Professional Clear Finish 1100 Satin Oil Based.

ddawg16 11-15-2012 11:31 AM

Like Brushjockey said....you typically apply the stain only once......

Please tell us that you have NOT applied the varnish yet?

I haven't heard the one about stockings either......I can see that in place of fine grit sand paper...but not wiping down stain.

Your process 'should' have been like this:

1. Sand the wood
2. Rub down the bare surface with pre-stain (this helps find any scratch marks and makes for a more even stain)
3. Apply stain...rubbing with a soft rag (I like old socks and t-shirts)
4. After drying, apply varnish. Min of 3 coats....allowing plenty of time to dry and rubbing between coats with 400 grit paper or 000 steel wool.

edit....personally, I don't really care for the MinWax products....I'll take Watco any day.

Brushjockey 11-15-2012 12:37 PM

Basically agree- although i never use steel wool for anything. I would sand with fine paper or sponge (220 grit or finer). Steel wool leaves little metal pieces that you need to make sure to get off. In any waterborne finish they can rust.
Industry standard for stained finish trim is stain+ 2 coats finish. Furniture might be nice for more, but I think the quality of the coating is most important.
Varathane isn't too bad. You should be fine with that.
My own preference in wood finishing is either Zar products or Old Masters.

ddawg16 11-15-2012 12:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 1052847)
Basically agree- although i never use steel wool for anything. I would sand with fine paper or sponge (220 grit). Steel wool leaves little metal pieces that you need to make sure to get off. In any waterborne finish they can rust.
Industry standard for stained finish trim is stain+ 2 coats finish. Furniture might be nice for more, but I think the quality of the coating is most important.
Varathane isn't too bad. You should be fine with that.
My own preference in wood finishing is either Zar products or Old Masters.

Oh....I know about that one....but then again, I use a shop vac to suck up the mess and then blow it off with air. Lacking those tools...sand paper is best.

Love the Zar stuff....that is what I use if Watco does not have a color I want....

Trim? My kids are rough on the house...3 coats min....but then again, I don't do woodworking for other people....just my own use so I tend to pile on the coats.....

One note to the OP....when using oil stains and then a water based varnish....you should wait about a week before you varnish it....otherwise, you could have issues with the varnish....

When it comes to wood working....you can't rush it....

Brushjockey 11-15-2012 12:48 PM

Watco is a danish oil finish- whole different animal than a stain/seal/finish system...

del schisler 11-15-2012 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackie54 (Post 1052648)
I am refinishing an antique table. Did the stripping and applied the first coat of min-wax stain. It dried completely within 5 hours so I applied a second coat, as per instructions. The second coat is now close to 11 hours and the table isn't completely drying. I realize some sections of the wood might be more porous than others, but, is this uneven drying time normal and is 11 hours a long time for it to dry? Thanks for your help.

i use the min-wax stain all the time, i only put on 1 coat and wipe it down, I than wait over nite probly 8-10 hr's and than i use spray lacquer , but if you didn't wipe it down after each app, that is the reason, also what you will get also is blotching , which is when stain goes into soft wood and absorb more than the hard part of the wood, if table is oak than it will be blotchy, if it is mahogany than it should be ok, you didn't say what wood. The stain will still have a wet feal to it but will be dry enough to put a finish, that is if it was wipe down after each app of the stain, i didn't read other post's yet good luck

user1007 11-15-2012 03:05 PM

Brass wool available online or from a woodworking shop is a great alternative to steel wool and any fragments you might miss will never oxidize as will steel.

However, successively fine paper, even into the wet/dry stuff and 300 or 400 finer grit is probably a better bet, especially between coats and for polishing out your finish coat. You can get a glass like surface even with poly if you use that.

A buffed out preservation type wax is not a bad idea over your polished and totally dry final coat.

DON'T RACE YOUR MATERIALS DRYING! You may have to sand off clogged parts of that second coat of stain once it dries.


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