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bhtko 09-24-2010 07:22 PM

2 coats stain or 1 coat primer & 1 coat paint?
 
I am going to be repainting the exterior of my house which has HardiPlank siding and cedar trim. Would it be better to use two coats of solid color stain (i.e. Sherwin Williams Woodscapes) or to use one coat primer (i.e. Bullseye 123) and one topcoat of paint (Sherwin Williams SuperPaint)? I am looking for the option that will give me the best look and longest life.

housepaintingny 09-24-2010 08:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bhtko (Post 506745)
I am going to be repainting the exterior of my house which has HardiPlank siding and cedar trim. Would it be better to use two coats of solid color stain (i.e. Sherwin Williams Woodscapes) or to use one coat primer (i.e. Bullseye 123) and one topcoat of paint (Sherwin Williams SuperPaint)? I am looking for the option that will give me the best look and longest life.

I would spot prime the hardieboard (any bare spots) then apply two coats of Sherwin Williams Superpaint

hammerheart14 09-24-2010 09:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bhtko (Post 506745)
I am going to be repainting the exterior of my house which has HardiPlank siding and cedar trim. Would it be better to use two coats of solid color stain (i.e. Sherwin Williams Woodscapes) or to use one coat primer (i.e. Bullseye 123) and one topcoat of paint (Sherwin Williams SuperPaint)? I am looking for the option that will give me the best look and longest life.

Unless Woodscapes is an oil stain, then go with one coat paint, two coats of finish (trust me).

Only a solid oil stain is self priming, solid acrylic stains only work on rough surfaces like t-111 (water doesn't penetrate like oil does.)

Oh, and if your house was painted in the first place, stick with paint. stains need to penetrate and paint is a skin. you can't penetrate a skin, unless you sand it off.

Pearl Painters 09-25-2010 08:31 AM

re-painting HardiPlank
 
Unless the HardiPlank is new and is not pre-primed I would go with two coats of 100% acrylic exterior house paint. If you do have raw spots then make sure and prime with a masonry primer that will handle the PH of the Hardiboard. Although solid color stain would work, it's not going to last as long as a Super Paint from Sherwins or equivalent.

www.PearlPainters.com
Pearl Painters Portland Oregon

Quote:

Originally Posted by bhtko (Post 506745)
I am going to be repainting the exterior of my house which has HardiPlank siding and cedar trim. Would it be better to use two coats of solid color stain (i.e. Sherwin Williams Woodscapes) or to use one coat primer (i.e. Bullseye 123) and one topcoat of paint (Sherwin Williams SuperPaint)? I am looking for the option that will give me the best look and longest life.


bhtko 09-25-2010 09:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pearl Painters (Post 506920)
Unless the HardiPlank is new and is not pre-primed I would go with two coats of 100% acrylic exterior house paint. If you do have raw spots then make sure and prime with a masonry primer that will handle the PH of the Hardiboard. Although solid color stain would work, it's not going to last as long as a Super Paint from Sherwins or equivalent.

www.PearlPainters.com
Pearl Painters Portland Oregon


Thank you all for your replies. It seems like eveyone who has replied has a different opinion so far. To clarify, the HardiPlank and cedar trim on my house is not new - it was painted once before when the house was built about 9 years ago. There are no bare spots on either. I will be changing colors as well, if that matters. I have had painting contractors come out to look at the house and both are offering two coats of stain as what they would recommend but one has also said that the one coat of primer with one coat of paint would be the "ultimate" solution for about a 10% higher price. I would like to try doing this myself so I am trying to figure out which of the two options would be a better solution. If anyone has any more thoughts or ideas on this they would be greatly appreciated.

Pearl Painters 09-25-2010 10:28 AM

Stain vs Paint on Hardi plank siding
 
The material cost will be more for paint but the labor should not change... Since this is a re-paint I would suggest 2 coats of 100% Acrylic house paint. If you want another opinion on what's best call the paint store and ask them what's best solid stain or paint. The cost difference between solid stain and paint should not be much more than $10 per gallon difference. And a 3000 sq ft home (2 story) should not use more than 20 gallons of paint for the siding and soffits. So if the price swing is more than a couple hundred bucks then something is not right. Another thing to think about is sheen level. Going with a Satin for the body and semi gloss for doors and trim will also outlast flat finishes, and as far as I know solid stains only come in flat.

Hope this helps!

www.PearlPainters.com
Pearl Painters Portland Oregon

Quote:

Originally Posted by bhtko (Post 506940)
Thank you all for your replies. It seems like eveyone who has replied has a different opinion so far. To clarify, the HardiPlank and cedar trim on my house is not new - it was painted once before when the house was built about 9 years ago. There are no bare spots on either. I have had painting contractors come out to look at the house and both are offering two coats of stain as what they would recommend but one has also said that the one coat of primer with one coat of paint would be the "ultimate" solution for about a 10% higher price. I know next to nothing about painting so I am trying to figure out which of the two options would be a better solution. If anyone has any more thoughts or ideas on this they would be greatly appreciated.


Matthewt1970 09-25-2010 11:06 AM

I think most will agree that once it has been painted then you need to stick with paint. Stain is designed to soak into the wood and a previoisly painted surface will not allow that.

Pearl Painters 09-25-2010 11:24 AM

Solid stain vs Paint
 
Matthew you are correct that stain is designed to soak in. In this case he was considering a solid stain which essentially looks like and acts like paint especially when applied over previously painted hardi plank (cement fiber board) not raw wood. Solid stain would work, but solid stains limit you to only a flat finish. I'm sure the coating manufacture would have something to add to this, but to me solid stain is allot like a watered down paint... (less solids) this allows the grain to still show when applied to wood. Stains also have the ability to be applied to raw wood, allowing someone to skip the primer step, and will not trigger tannins to leach from wood. At the end of the day I would recommend the slightly more expensive paint option which will last several years longer than a solid stain... well worth the couple hundred bucks extra!

www.PearlPainters.com
Pearl Painters Portland Oregon


quote=Matthewt1970;506968]I think most will agree that once it has been painted then you need to stick with paint. Stain is designed to soak into the wood and a previoisly painted surface will not allow that.[/quote]

bhtko 09-25-2010 11:28 AM

[quote=Pearl Painters;506977]Matthew you are correct that stain is designed to soak in. In this case he was considering a solid stain which essentially looks like and acts like paint especially when applied over previously painted hardi plank (cement fiber board) not raw wood. Solid stain would work, but solid stains limit you to only a flat finish. I'm sure the coating manufacture would have something to add to this, but to me solid stain is allot like a watered down paint... (less solids) this allows the grain to still show when applied to wood. Stains also have the ability to be applied to raw wood, allowing someone to skip the primer step, and will not trigger tannins to leach from wood. At the end of the day I would recommend the slightly more expensive paint option which will last several years longer than a solid stain... well worth the couple hundred bucks extra!

www.PearlPainters.com
Pearl Painters Portland Oregon

Thank you for your thoughts! When using a paint is there a necessity for using a primer first? Also, because it is thicker will a paint hide the woodgrain look of the HardiPlank?

Pearl Painters 09-25-2010 01:41 PM

Painted HardiPlank
 
1 Attachment(s)
[quote=bhtko;506978]
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pearl Painters (Post 506977)
Matthew you are correct that stain is designed to soak in. In this case he was considering a solid stain which essentially looks like and acts like paint especially when applied over previously painted hardi plank (cement fiber board) not raw wood. Solid stain would work, but solid stains limit you to only a flat finish. I'm sure the coating manufacture would have something to add to this, but to me solid stain is allot like a watered down paint... (less solids) this allows the grain to still show when applied to wood. Stains also have the ability to be applied to raw wood, allowing someone to skip the primer step, and will not trigger tannins to leach from wood. At the end of the day I would recommend the slightly more expensive paint option which will last several years longer than a solid stain... well worth the couple hundred bucks extra!

www.PearlPainters.com
Pearl Painters Portland Oregon

Thank you for your thoughts! When using a paint is there a necessity for using a primer first? Also, because it is thicker will a paint hide the woodgrain look of the HardiPlank?



Your welcome!

If the siding has already painted with a water based paint and there is not any raw hardiplank then applying two coats of paint would be better than 1 coat of primer and 1 coat of paint. Attached is a photo of painted HardiPlank... this is my house here in Portland Oregon, it is 9 years old and what you are seeing is its second paint job, (1 layer of primer, and a total of 4 coats of paint). As you can see the pronounced grain of Hardi is quite visible, you would have to put many, many layers on before you would start to loose the grain.

You should be set, good luck!

Brian Kemnitz
www.PearlPainters.com
Pearl Painters, Portland Oregon

bhtko 09-25-2010 02:19 PM

Which paint would you recommend for HardiPlank siding, Sherwin Williams Duration or Sherwin Williams SuperPaint?

Pearl Painters 09-25-2010 04:10 PM

Both are good... Super paint has been on the market longer, but the paint store will tell you that duration is the best. If your like most and want to change color every 10 years then I would save some money and go with super paint.

www.PearlPainters.com
Pearl Painters Portland Oregon


Quote:

Originally Posted by bhtko (Post 507030)
Which paint would you recommend for HardiPlank siding, Sherwin Williams Duration or Sherwin Williams SuperPaint?


edpainting 09-26-2010 03:09 PM

2 coats of stain
 
It is best to use stain whenever you can. If you go with primer and paint you are still supposed to apply two coats of paint after priming. Painting may give you more years the first time but staining will be better in the long run.

Exterior Painting
CT Painters

bhtko 09-26-2010 04:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by edpainting (Post 507415)
It is best to use stain whenever you can. If you go with primer and paint you are still supposed to apply two coats of paint after priming. Painting may give you more years the first time but staining will be better in the long run.

Exterior Painting
CT Painters


Why is it best to use stain whenever you can and why is staining better in the long run? I was planning on using no primer and two coats of SuperPaint.

edpainting 09-26-2010 05:16 PM

As sb suggested above if it is already painted stick to paint. If it is primed you can go either way. You say that you have cedar trim if that is rough then it's made to stain (you still need to prime though, oil primer if you are going a light color especially). The advantage of stain over paint is that it won't crack and peel like paint will because is more elastic and will expand and contract with the wood. Now on the hardiplank paint will probably be the best choice because it doesn't have that problem and the advantage paint has over stain is that it will fade slower.
If it's not pre-primed 1 coat of primer and 2 coats of either will be fine, you can't go wrong.

Exterior Painting Contractors


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