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Old 12-13-2009, 10:45 PM   #1
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1st Steps in Painting?


My wife and I are in the process of escrow on our 1st house. When we did a our walk through for our inspection we noticed we needed to paint a few rooms because of chipped paint and also because we want difference color's in different rooms.

I have never fully painted different rooms, or painted in general so I am wondering what steps will need to be completed 1st. Obviously fill any and all holes with a puty. Then do I put a coat of primer on it? Or do I sand all the walls down 1st? After that then I can put on however many coats of paint? How many is to many coats? Any paint brand recommendations? How long do you usually let the paint dry? Do I need to have the heater on to hurry up the drying process?

Are there any specific tools that will come in handy and make the process alot faster and easier?

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

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Old 12-14-2009, 05:29 AM   #2
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1st Steps in Painting?


I do not have time right now to answer all those questions but this site will be a start

http://valspar.com/do-it-yourself.ht...rch2009_Google


Skip the Valspare paint and ANY paint from ANY Big box store and go to a real paint store such as Benjamin Moore to acquire your paint and primer. They will also gladly answer all your questions.When I get home this evening and any of your queatios have not been answered,I will try and help out.

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Old 12-14-2009, 06:52 AM   #3
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1st Steps in Painting?


I will try to respond later too. Definitely plan on good paint and the best tools you can afford to buy. You will have them for quite awhile if you take care of them.

What did your closing documents and prior owners say about the paint? If it happens to have lead content you will need to abate it and you may not be able to do this yourself depending on where you are.

You will probably want to use drywall compound for most repairs. You should at least spot prime over it but given your description I would prime everything. Then plan on two coats of finish.

Benjamin Moore is my fave brand of paint but Sherwin Williams is great too. As mentioned, stay away from the box store brands.

Last edited by user1007; 12-14-2009 at 06:56 AM.
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Old 12-14-2009, 08:08 PM   #4
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1st Steps in Painting?


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
I will try to respond later too. Definitely plan on good paint and the best tools you can afford to buy. You will have them for quite awhile if you take care of them.

What did your closing documents and prior owners say about the paint? If it happens to have lead content you will need to abate it and you may not be able to do this yourself depending on where you are.

You will probably want to use drywall compound for most repairs. You should at least spot prime over it but given your description I would prime everything. Then plan on two coats of finish.

Benjamin Moore is my fave brand of paint but Sherwin Williams is great too. As mentioned, stay away from the box store brands.
We havent closed on the property yet, so nothing has been said about the paint. But I am 100% sure it doesnt have lead because the house was built in 2002. Didn't they elimante lead based paints well before that?

I look forward to hearing your guys more detailed responses, and will duley note everything for when we paint(probably be on New Years).
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Old 12-15-2009, 03:18 AM   #5
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1st Steps in Painting?


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Originally Posted by Qckrun View Post
We havent closed on the property yet, so nothing has been said about the paint. But I am 100% sure it doesnt have lead because the house was built in 2002. Didn't they elimante lead based paints well before that?

I look forward to hearing your guys more detailed responses, and will duley note everything for when we paint(probably be on New Years).
Lead paint is not likely an issue for you given the age of the house. If it is peeling in many places it is likely a humidity issue or even more likely cheap paint that was put over a non primed surface. Will work on a basic tool and material list for you today. Do plan on getting to know your paint store folks. If you get there early mornings, there are usually a few of us waiting for orders to be filled that will be happy to answer questions too I would suspect so don't be shy about asking.

Last edited by user1007; 12-15-2009 at 03:22 AM.
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Old 12-15-2009, 05:03 AM   #6
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1st Steps in Painting?


Do plan on getting to know your paint store folks. If you get there early mornings, there are usually a few of us waiting for orders to be filled that will be happy to answer questions too I would suspect so don't be shy about asking.
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Old 12-15-2009, 06:15 AM   #7
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1st Steps in Painting?


This is what I have come up with so far for you, just trying to run through what I use on a regular basis. Obviously I don't think about it since most is second nature.

I will say that painting is the final step in at all. The quality of the job is always in the prep noone will ever see. I still feel great though when it is time to actually roll paint which is why I hate to hear people using crappy box store stuff at that point.

Here is my stream of conciousness starting tool list. Hope it helps. I promise a basic material list that will be much shorter later. Remember though as you FedEx a last minute list to Santa? You want good tools starting with a nice ladder and one that is not electrically conductive if you can get away with it.

First let me suggest again that there is no such thing as a cheap tool. This does not mean you shouldn't seek out inexpensive ones when appropriate but always seek out safe ones. We all bash Chinese stuff on here but some is more than fine and even better than US equivalents I hate to say. No matter what country makes it, you have to hold it in your hand and see if it looks like something that will hold up.

I will mention that home painters often make the mistake of buying painting tools too small. I seldom ever use a putty knife for even small picture frame holes in a wall or a 1” brush for much for example.


  1. Ladders. Your home deserves to have you part of it for a long time and on legs, not in a wheelchair. Don't skimp on ladders.
  2. Scrapers. A good scraper should be comfortable for you to hold, have a nice handle and always sharp blades. There is perhaps no more dangerous a cutting tool of any kind than a dull one. They come in the form of those you push from you like a chisel and those you drag toward you.
  3. Patching Tools. You will find a drywall taping knife with a nice riveted handle a tool you use a lot. I also use a wide drywall skim coating knife a lot. I use drywall mud pans. I still like the metal ones but the plastic ones with metal edges are a compromise.
  4. Sanding Stuff. I have some nice equipment for sanding all shapes of things that hooks into shop vacs but I think the DIYer will do well with the name brand foam sanding blocks. You can also wet sand lightweight drywall compound and carwash sponges come in handy for this. You will need the sponges for washing cabinets and walls anyhow.
  5. Good Shop Vac. Equip it with the extra drywall dust filter and use optional bags if doing a lot of drywall work. Every house needs one anyhow.
  6. Screwdriver/Nut Driver Combo Set comes in handy for pulling cover plates and other stuff you need out of your way. Put the screws right back into the boxes by the way and they will not get lost and will be there when time to put the plates back on.
  7. Paint Can Key. Please don't use a screwdriver to open lids on paint cans. Even if they say they are for sale, the paint store will give you a paint can key or two. And maybe a free cap or two also if you want them.
  8. Drop Cloths. If you must use the plastic ones, at least buy them heavy enough to hold together for your project while you try to get them unfolded and moved around. The canvas ones are so much nicer and you won't be slipping around on them.
  9. Brushes and Roller Covers. Buy decent one. You will be surprised how fast you adapt to a nice long handled, 2-1/2” angled sash brush and even a 3” one. If you take care of it and one like it, you will have them for the lifetime of your house. Wooster makes a cute little stubby thing that is great once in awhile. I have a 1” thing I use every five years or so. Don't buy tiny brushes just because you are painting thin trim. You can almost draw a pinstripe with the edge of a nice sash brush. I wouldn't use anything less than 3/8 nap when it comes to a roller cover.
  10. Tape. I use it only when I have to but for novice painters I guess it might be worth it. Buy good quality, name brand painters tape. The place where tape does come in handy for me is between baseboards and wtw carpeting. Lay down a nice wide 2” piece of good old fashioned masking tape, not painters tape with about 1/2” extending on to the baseboard. Gently press that 1/2” down between the baseboard and the carpet with a drywall knife. Paint away. Remove the tape and the carpet springs back to cover an mistakes hiding. I do love the tape corners I found for painting windows. Used to cut my own.
  11. Non-Slip Roller Handles. Nothing worse than a roller cover slipping around on you and the $3 ones will collapse and this will happen! I like the ones with the rubber fins (you had better bend a few times before putting the roller cover on).
  12. Borrow or Buy a good roller handle extension. I like the adjustable aluminum ones but a good wood one will work two. I do have one you can build up in sections but it has real fittings for joining it together and cost $30 or so if I remember, not $6 like those kits the box stores sell with plastic fittings.
  13. Get a nice roller tray. Line it if you want but the vacuum formed plastic ones are no big deal to clean out if using latex. I bought 100s of these great trays my local dollar stores were selling at one time. They were cheaper than tray liners and as structurally solid as any metal tray.
  14. Dollar stores are great sources for plastic containers with lids you can use to dump out paint for cutting in and so forth. Your paint store will have cute things too. Never paint out of the original can or return paint to it, IMO. And you know, if something goes wrong and you spill a pint of paint off the ladder and not a brand new gallon?
  15. Not that I ever make any but mistake equipment comes in handy for others. A small bucket of clean water, razor blades (and I do like the new plastic ones) come in handy. A nice supply of old soft washcloths or even new ones is not a bad idea. I will try to cover it in my basic materials list but latex is easier to deal with when wet. Second best is when it is dry. Miserable at times in between.

Last edited by user1007; 12-15-2009 at 06:24 AM.
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Old 12-15-2009, 12:25 PM   #8
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1st Steps in Painting?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Qckrun View Post
My wife and I are in the process of escrow on our 1st house. When we did a our walk through for our inspection we noticed we needed to paint a few rooms because of chipped paint and also because we want difference color's in different rooms.

I have never fully painted different rooms, or painted in general so I am wondering what steps will need to be completed 1st. Obviously fill any and all holes with a puty. Then do I put a coat of primer on it? Or do I sand all the walls down 1st? After that then I can put on however many coats of paint? How many is to many coats? Any paint brand recommendations? How long do you usually let the paint dry? Do I need to have the heater on to hurry up the drying process?

Are there any specific tools that will come in handy and make the process alot faster and easier?

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Dry paint sometimes cracks or flakes through at least one coat due to aging, which ultimately will lead to complete failure of the paint. In its early stages, the problem appears as hairline cracks; in its later stages, flaking occurs.

What Causes It?

Cracking and flaking can be caused by the following:
  • Using a lower-quality paint that has inadequate adhesion and flexibility.
  • Overthinning or overspreading the paint when applying it.
  • Inadequately preparing the surface, or applying the paint to bare wood without first applying a primer.
  • Excessive alkyd paint hardens and becomes brittle as the paint job ages.
How to Solve It
To solve cracking and flaking, first remove all loose and flaking paint with a scraper or wire brush. Then, sand the surface and feather the edges.
If the flaking occurs in multiple layers of paint, you may need to use a filler.
Prime bare wood areas before repainting. Using a top-quality primer and topcoat should prevent a recurrence of this problem.



Painting Process
  • Move or compact all furniture in the area.
  • Completley cover floors and furniture.
  • Electric plate covers, and trim hardware are removed.(if painting trim)
  • Sand walls using a pole sander with 150 grit sandpaper.(can be purchased at any paint store)
  • Blemishes, holes and cracks ion walls and ceiling are fixed.
  • Sand areas that where fixed.
  • Paint ceilings first.
  • Paint walls last.
A trick to get a clean cut line on ceiling is to take a pencil and trace a line around ceiling LIGHTLEY then you just follow the line when cuttung in walls to ceiling. Around all base boards and trim use painters tape(the better job you do here the better finished product you will have when finished.)
I highley reccomend CLEAN EDGE TAPE it is very expensive, but worth every penny.

In your situation I would prime walls and ceilings with pittsburgh paints latex seal grip primer(if colors on walls, then have primer tinted to color to save extra coats of paint)
I reccomend either sherwin williams or benjamin moore as long as it is there top of the line product. I also reccomend always using flat paint for ceilings, and if the walls are in bad shape use flat on the walls reason being the higher sheen you use the more inperfections will be noticable.
Always wait one day between coats of paint.

http://AlandBriansPainting.com


Move or compact all furniture in the area.

    • The floors and furniture will be completely covered.

    • Electric plate covers and trim hardware are removed.

    • Plastic sheeting is utilized to contain and minimize dust.

    • Walls and trim are completely sanded.

    • Blemishes, holes and cracks in walls and ceilings are fixed.
    • Holes and cracks in trim will be caulked or puttied.



Last edited by BrianP3222; 12-15-2009 at 12:27 PM.
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