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drskipper 03-20-2012 12:54 AM

What do I need to move out to my first apartment?
 
I'm trying to figure out what exactly I need to move out. I'm not talking about things that will come with an apartment like a refridgerator, oven, and shower, but things like couches, bathtowels, dining table, coffee machine, storage organizers, iron and ironing board...Of course, I'm not moving out next month, probably not for another year, and I am also hoping I can move out with my best friend as well, so we will share the costs of these things together. But I am wondering what are the necessities of moving out that can be overlooked: bathtowels are necessary, cleaning supplies are necessary...what makes up a home?

joecaption 03-20-2012 01:02 AM

#1 Figure out how to do this with no one else to count on for 1/2 the rent.
They will move out at the worst possible time and leave you hanging.
First place? Go to the DAV or Good Will and pick up anything you will need for1/3 the price of new. Furnished my first house with everything, couch, chairs TV Micro Wave, dishes, pots and pans, glasses ect. for less then $300.00.

Doorman54 03-20-2012 08:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption
#1 Figure out how to do this with no one else to count on for 1/2 the rent.
They will move out at the worst possible time and leave you hanging.
First place? Go to the DAV or Good Will and pick up anything you will need for1/3 the price of new. Furnished my first house with everything, couch, chairs TV Micro Wave, dishes, pots and pans, glasses ect. for less then $300.00.

I agree with all of this!!!
A "home" can be more involved then just what you "need".
We have 2 spaghetti strainers!!

I look at each room individually and decide what's needed in each one.
Make a list.....I use my smartphone for lists....always in your pocket.
The kitchens probably gonna suck up most of your list followed by the bathroom.
Look around where you currently live and use that as s start.

CoconutPete 03-20-2012 09:02 AM

Make sure your roommate signs the lease as well!

md2lgyk 03-20-2012 11:30 AM

Rent a furnished apartment.

hyunelan2 03-20-2012 12:35 PM

My wife and I started out [circa 2004] in a small apartment with little more than what we had from college. We bought a new mattress/box from a local place and some bedroom furniture from Ikea. I think that was all we bought new. Our couch came from Craigslist, livingroom furniture was hand-me-down from her parents and brother, all the kitchen stuff came from the second-hand store. I would say that I never realized how many different kitchen things you need until then (pots, pans, plates, cups, etc).

I wouldn't focus too much on furniture and stuff. If you have a TV, you can throw down some bean-bag chairs and voila - instant livingroom to start. Just pay attention to everything you use now - for a couple of weeks. Did you take a shower? What did you use (shampoo, soap, towels, laundry hamper)? Did you get something to drink - was it in a pitcher in the fridge, what did you pour it into, did you get ice cubes from the tray?

Thinking like that for a few weeks will give you a better understanding of what you "need" on a regular basis.

drskipper 03-20-2012 01:06 PM

I live next to a dollar store and noticed that they have some kitchen stuff there ie dishes, cups, towels, utensils, etc...are those worth buying or would it be better to go to walmart?

md2lgyk 03-20-2012 04:50 PM

How old are you? You seem to lack some basic life skills.

Were I you, I'd go to the cheapest place I could find for things for your first place. It's not going to be stuff you'll keep forever. Even paper plates, plastic utensils, styrofoam cups, and camping chairs would do. That's what I did once upon a time in the 1970s. But then, as retired military, I slept on the ground and occasionally ate things most people wouldn't.

mwpiper 03-20-2012 11:33 PM

When my fiance entered my apartment, she found a mattress on the floor (before futons were cool!) I didn't have a dresser. I had steel shelves in the closet because I could layout everything where I could see it (the designers at HGTV will eventually catch up with my avant guard stylings)

Everybody I know who apartmented with others ended up having to live alone for a while. The first thing you need to move out is the ability to pay the rent at least for a while until the old room mate can be replaced. The second thing you need is...to move in. I lived for years in the '70s without a TV. It is not a necessity. I had piles of books. My apartment would have been SOooooooo much less cluttered if Kindles had existed back then. You need a touch of creativity to make do without the stuff you think you need but don't have. Can you cook? You should learn. Otherwise that rent money you need goes to McDonalds. Can't cook? I recommend Alton Brown's Good Eats series (of course that does require the TV you may not have) Moving out isn't about furnishings. It's about problem solving.

Doc Holliday 03-20-2012 11:59 PM

Best to start on hand me down furniture, stuff you can find on craigslist.

My first efficiency apt some over 10 years ago I bought a good condition full sized futon for $100. It was my couch and bed for a few months until I got a bed.

I started out with dollar store plates and silverware, nothing wrong with it. It does the job and that's what matters. When I could afford better I did so. I'm not into fancy forks, just something quality I could shovel spaghetti into my face with. Plus a better set of cooking utensils comes down the road.

All you need is the basics to start no matter how cheap, the rest will fall into place over time. And as said, make damn skippy you make enough to cover all the rent and bills yourself just in case.

Doc Holliday 03-21-2012 12:07 AM

And I still go to the dollar store for deoderant. Same brands, just a few bucks cheaper.

A lot of these dollar stores pick up stuff from big brand box stores who've closed a store or had an accident such as a fire. They buy it for cents on the dollar and mark it up and still make their money. You can actually find quality stuff there.

I also buy cleaning supplies from there.

user1007 03-21-2012 01:45 PM

Places like Big Lots are liquidators of sometimes nice merchandise. You have to shop carefully but you can get great deals. Tuesday Morning is another one but higher up the food chain.

Chicago has issued a caution not to purchase used upholstered furniture because of the bed bug crisis. Not sure I would be so paranoid but it is worth keeping in mind. In addition to thrift stores and things, we have several places that liquidate high end hotel furnishings for next to nothing.

As mentioned, Dollar type stores can be great for basic dishes and silverware. Do be aware that some of the glazed coffee mugs may have cheap Chinese glazes with lead though.

The neighborhood where I live is very high end for the most part and the things people donate can be really nice. So, shop in thrift stores that serve such areas where you live.

Making sure your roommate (and corresponding co-signer) is on the lease is great advice. Not much you can do about it if the person has no money but at least you have legal remedy to pursue. You and your roommate should sit down ahead of time and come up with some house rules and expectations. Now is the time to talk about policies regarding parties, entertaining, sleepovers/squatters, etc. As you buy things, keep an inventory and initial as to who owns what. You might want to share your final agreement with your co-signers for their input.

Depending on your situation, your first apartment may be lower cost? Make sure you have your local tenants union look over the lease and do check out the landlord ahead of time. Make sure you understand the lease terms.

Make sure you have enough money for the rent AND deposits for the apartment, utilities and so forth. You will probably have to deposit money for a year or so if utilities have never been in your name before. In NYC it was not uncommon to have to pay to use the freight elevator for moving in and out.

mwpiper 03-21-2012 02:45 PM

You can call it the Sheldon Cooper Memorial Roommate Agreement (for those Big Bang Theory fans out there)


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