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Old 06-06-2013, 07:46 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wkearney99 View Post

"Tons of money" is, again, relative. Much like what someone's idea of "a living" might be.

When I hear of stuff like 'renting' in second life I know people have too much free time on their hands. What a ridiculous waste.

Well, it's over six figures for the rental script thing alone, I know that much, a blurb from the company web site who developed the scripts for the rental box says:

Quote:
The hippoRENT Networked Rental System has been bought by over 70,000 Second Life users to take the stress out of renting and is the most powerful rental system available. It combines a rental box at the land or property you are renting, vendors to advertise your spaces to customers and a central server to manage your entire business from one central location. Or for the ultimate experience, use the web-enabled version of hippoRENT, allowing you to manage every aspect of your rental business using any web browser of your choice.
Their rent system costs the equiv of $8.79 to buy, if you multiply 70,000 by $8.79 you get over $600,000 for that one product alone, and it's little more than a few scripts that generate money for them continuously.

http://hippo-technologies.info/products-4/hipporent-2/

After the rental box they developed a whole line of products, including a menu driven vending script people buy to use to sell their items, every one who has things to sell buys one of these vending things to control all aspects of it for them:


Quote:
An easy to use and remarkably powerful vending system, allowing you to easily sell your products anywhere you choose through Second Life. The hippoVEND system consists of a server, into which you place your products, and vendors which you can rez throughout the Grid. Add a beautifully designed web interface that makes managing your network simplicity itself and you’ve got the most elegant vending solution yet conceived in Second Life.
The hippoVEND Web-Enabled Networked Vending System is an easy to use and remarkably powerful vending system, allowing you to easily sell your products anywhere you choose through Second Life.
It consists of a server, into which you place your products, and vendors which you can rez throughout the Grid. When a customer pays a vendor, or clicks it for information, it contacts the server to deliver the item or information notecard. This means you can sell your items in as many locations as you wish, yet only have to keep the inventory up to date on one server.

Quote:
In 2009 the total size of the Second Life economy grew 65% to US $567 million, about 25% of the entire U.S. virtual goods market. Gross Resident Earnings are $55 million US Dollars in 2009 - 11% growth over 2008
This lady is one of many I know of, the numbers are changed from below, it's now $295/mo not $200, and $1,000 not $1,250;


Quote:
The Virtual Rockefeller
Anshe Chung is raking in real money in an unreal online world.


By Paul Sloan, CNN Money

December 1, 2005

To understand the lucrative real estate empire Anshe Chung has created, it helps to spend some time with her "in world." There, she might teleport you to one of her islands, on the continent she's named Dreamland. You can stroll through the floating city she built 700 feet above a desert, walk through elegant Arabian-style homes on land she leases, strike up a conversation in Japanese amid her Asian gardens, or shop for a grand piano in one of her 600 boutiques. It's all virtual, of course--part of a flourishing online universe called Second Life. And if it sounds absurd, consider this: While Anshe won't talk about how much money she's making ("I'm careful not to stir animosity," she says), Philip Rosedale, the founder and CEO of Linden Lab, which runs Second Life, estimates that she's bringing in around $150,000 a year--in real, hard cash.

Anshe buys up Second Life land, paying Linden Lab roughly $200 a month for each 16-acre plot, plus a one-time fee of $1,250. Then she develops the land, using Photoshop to add rivers, mountains, and forests. Sometimes she hires subcontractors to improve the acreage by designing or building houses. Then she sells or rents to other Second Lifers, who pay good money to inhabit her creations. As in the real world, prices vary by location. But often someone will pay Anshe $100 up front to buy a one-acre plot, plus $20 a month in land tax. In a case like that, Anshe makes $112 in her first year. She's done more than 10,000 various real estate deals. "I'm like Wal-Mart," she says. "The margins are small, but the volume isn't."

Quote:
Investing in the online property boom
As the virtual world of Second Life adds more languages, a growing group of users are cashing in for real money.
Katie Benner, Fortune reporter CNN Money

October 20 2006:

The profits are real, even though the landscape and the character named Anshe Chung are simulated. The woman who created Chung, and whose brick-and-mortar home is in Germany, owns about $250,000 in virtual land that she buys, sells and leases with fellow virtual citizens, or avatars. In Second Life, users can fly, teleport and create anything their imaginations and skills allow. Moreover, they can freely buy and sell their goods for an in-world currency, called Linden dollars, that can be exchanged for real life greenbacks.

Even when the virtual world was essentially bilingual, Second Life had users in 101 countries and was exploding in terms of population and commerce. There are more than 1 million residents, up from about 20,000 a year ago, and they're spending more than $400,000 in a typical 24-hour period on land, clothing, batwings, beautifully constructed facial expressions and programs that allow their avatars to engage in warm embraces and other physical manifestations of human emotion.
Quote:
A second income on Second Life

By James Turner, Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor

"Blaze Columbia" is, by any measure, doing well with his line of designer clothing. He's on track to generate more than $100,000 in annual profits, barely a year after launching his business. And that's in addition to a first career as a professional photographer.
There's just one big difference between the clothing that this Missouri resident produces and that of any other top-of-the-line dress or business suit: His don't exist – at least not in the physical world.
"Mr. Columbia" is an in-game name for a player on Second Life

Columbia, who requested that his real name not be used because he wishes to keep his "real life" and "online life" separate, sells virtual clothing to other players, part of a purely electronic economy that's redefining how some think about the nature of money.
Doug Bassett (in-game name "Doug Latrell") also operates a successful SL business. As a senior technical instructor for Thomson NETg, a training company in Scottsdale, Ariz., he teaches courses that involve Cisco and Microsoft technologies. Mr. Bassett has now extended his company's presence into SL, offering its courses in the game world. Revenue from in-game sales of courses is more than $10,000 a month and growing, he says.
A major factor in opening an SL branch was the "coolness factor and a unique way of meeting people that we wouldn't normally meet," he says.
This same "coolness" has led Dell Computers, Nissan, and Pontiac to offer virtual versions of their products for in-game use by players.

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Old 06-06-2013, 08:04 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
Pretty horse. Nice,,,, uh, rabbit?... too.
The horse was a free .collada file I imported to the grid, it's pretty decent and the textures are as well.

No, that's not a rabbit, not too far off however, that's a custom made avatar I created based on a wolf character in an animated movie by Universal Studios titled "Balto"



Movie Trailer

The avatar front view, I combined my in-world Native American Indian theme costuming and spear, with my interpretation of the movie character's head, paws and tail, this is one of my avatars I wear a lot. I don't give copies of it out, so I am the only one who has it.






Last edited by RWolff; 06-06-2013 at 08:06 PM.
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Old 06-06-2013, 11:31 PM   #18
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Wow that looks really cool. I'll have to mess with that.

Been toying with the idea of making a Minecraft like game but with a MMO aspect. Could definitely mess with the source code of that to learn stuff. I know very little about Open GL. I made a cube once, and made it spin, that's about it. lol
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Old 06-06-2013, 11:52 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Squirrel View Post
Wow that looks really cool. I'll have to mess with that.

Been toying with the idea of making a Minecraft like game but with a MMO aspect. Could definitely mess with the source code of that to learn stuff. I know very little about Open GL. I made a cube once, and made it spin, that's about it. lol

You would probably have a lot of fun with this then. The software is free, opensource, and it's not difficult to understand.
The scripting language used in Secondlife is the same used by opensimulator, but there are slight differences as one uses the Havok physics engine and the other uses a different physics engine.
Havok is very expensive and is a licensed, fee based product Secondlife uses, opensimulator's physics engine is free, opensource and almost comparable.
The scripting language is called LSL and it's written in C# but with some modifications.

The software runs on all platforms, pc/windows, mac OSX, linux, openSUSE and all the others.

Try http://opensimulator.org/wiki/Main_Page
It can be downloaded there too.

I have run it locally on mac for backup purposes, the software itself is set up to run locally out of the "box" by default, and to use a built in sqLITE to make things easier to start with initially.
sqLITE is not very good, but it's good for testing an initial setup to be sure the port forwarding etc and all the settings are correct and it starts up.
I, and most experienced people use a full mySQL database though.
Some have used cloud based computing with varying success, though cloud servers, and Google's cloud thing are not really designed for this type of use and demand.

You normally only need the dependencies (.NET frameworks 3.5 for windows machines, or mono for linux) and to edit a couple of settings in the ini file, open a port for it and it's good to go.

You mentioned rotation, here's an example of a rotate script that does what my colorful cubes are doing, very simple, basic stuff and only a couple of lines of code;


Code:
 //Rotates very slowly around a sphere's local X axis .... Good for making a globe that rotates around a tilted axis
 
default
{
    state_entry()
    {
       llTargetOmega(<1.0,0.0,0.0>*llGetRot(),0.1,0.01);
    }
}
You change speed, direction, axis etc by changing those numbers, aas well as adding a minus sign. A similar script that does the same basic thing is this one used to make a sailing ship rotate around a large area on the ocean:

Code:
integer swim=TRUE;

default
{
    state_entry()
    {
        llTargetOmega(<0,0,-.003>,PI,.05);
        //003
    }
    
    touch_start(integer num)
    {
        swim=!swim;
        llTargetOmega(<0,0,-.003*swim>,PI,0.05);
    }
}
"state entry" can be changed to touch start, collision start and a number of others.
You'll notice one big difference from the normal scripting language, the use of "ll" per:

llTargetOmega

the "ll" is for Linden Labs, the originators of Secondlife, it's a coding they came up with years ago to create events and functions.

The University of Cincinatti has a grid too, as many do, their web site offers a considerable amount of info. I took a look the other day, some pretty impressive builds for their campus, you feel like you are right there.
I didn't create an acct to get there directly, I entered through my own grid.

http://ucsim.uc.edu/blog/opensim/connect-to-uc-opensim/


Last edited by RWolff; 06-07-2013 at 12:19 AM.
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