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-   -   Honey Bee Crisis (http://www.diychatroom.com/f39/honey-bee-crisis-155718/)

user1007 09-03-2012 06:16 PM

Honey Bee Crisis
 
Found a great film on the honey bee crisis. Scientists and beekeepers still have no real clue as to what is happening to them. I did not realize we steal their honey early and fill hives with corn syrup. It is killing us so I guess we should not be surprised it might not be doing the bees any good.

Anyhow, it is a big deal as they pollinate billions of dollars worth of fruit, nut and vege crops in the US alone. And I guess we have resorted to importing bees from the Ausies. You know they all have to be descended from British criminals too!

http://www.hulu.com/watch/397072

user1007 06-09-2013 09:52 AM

As the crisis continues one solution is to create a honey bee sperm bank. European honey bees are stronger but because of mites were banned from US import. Artificial insemination could enable queens here to reproduce the stronger species.

I think this article stresses again how important honey bees are to what we eat and how dramatically the hives continue to collapse. According to this article 1 in 3 colonies collapsed over this past winter. 1 out of 3 bites of the foods we eat come from honey bee pollination. Rather scary?

http://www.sciencerecorder.com/news/...colony-crisis/

oh'mike 06-09-2013 10:00 AM

Let's not jump on the 'imported insect' band wagon---
we have imported a few already and that did not work well--

Stronger African bees

Bigger stronger lady bugs

Memory fails me--but there have been other attempt at importing insects that backfired---

RWolff 06-09-2013 11:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1197936)
Let's not jump on the 'imported insect' band wagon---

Yep, ladybugs brought in to kill another pest and they became a pest themselves, plus they BITE.

Africanized bees that attack and kill people and animals- another human manipulation gone awry.

That's the problem, we manipulate and "control" wildlife without a clue what we are doing or how the whole system actually works. It's led to things like failed bounty programs that kill off a population of animals in a large area only to see those in adjacent areas reproduce twice as fast and move into the vacant region. Then we feed and "protect" deer during part of the year and removed their natural predators and they reproduce so fast they overrun many places.

Its been said the bee die off is from the genetically modified foods, or even pesticides or herbicides, probably a combination of all three take your pick. The way it's going now a few mega corps will have PATENTS on seeds and the food grown by the majority of farmers as they will switch over to the new seeds for various reasons, so these corps will have the main control on the nation's food supply. There's already crops that grow which don't produce seeds- they were modified that way and patented, this is so the company can for farmers to buy seeds every year, is it any wonder bees are dying from this manipulated garbage found "safe" by the USDA govt shills and big industry "tests" they paid for?

Windows on Wash 06-09-2013 02:32 PM

Ladybugs are poisonous too.

Don't ask me how I know.

oh'mike 06-09-2013 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Windows on Wash (Post 1198100)
Ladybugs are poisonous too.

Don't ask me how I know.

I was cutting outside last year----the son of a gun sure do bite---
I never was tempted to eat one or bite back:laughing:

RWolff 06-09-2013 03:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1198112)
I was cutting outside last year----the son of a gun sure do bite---
I never was tempted to eat one or bite back:laughing:

I've mentioned ladybug bites to a friend and she said "ladybugs BITE?? since when?"
Since we imported a nasty strain of them and they got way out of hand, they come in the house thru the tiniest cracks, under the door, siding gaps, and many people are allergic to them- if they are crushed or disturbed they give off a substance that can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

Some also say they have a very unpleasant smell when crushed and the liquids also stain.

Here's the story on these, the bees are more of less the same kind of backstory:

Quote:

Asian lady bugs, with the scientific name Harmonia axyridis, were released as a pest-control measure against aphids in many areas of the United States until 1990. These insects began to swarm inside houses in the late fall to protect themselves from freezing weather in the wintertime.

Since then, large populations of Asian ladybugs can be found infesting houses in Wisconsin, Kentucky, Missouri, West Virginia, and along the East Coast to as far south as Georgia. Typically, rural and suburban homes are more commonly affected than homes in urban settings.

There have been numerous reports and studies on Asian ladybugs causing allergic symptoms in people, including: Asian ladybugs release an orange-colored fluid as a defensive measure, which has a foul odor. Proteins from this fluid, along with dropping and other body parts, likely become airborne, causing allergic symptoms in susceptible people.



In certain areas of the country, such as West Virginia, positive allergy tests to Asian ladybugs in people seeking care from an allergist are as high as 21%.


funfool 06-09-2013 03:52 PM

Not sure where I fit in here. I have a small yarden with veggies and native plants, drip irrigation and is my hobby to get me outside and have fun.
In another forum we have talked about honey bee's a lot and aware of the problem.
I find it hard to believe that 1 out of 3 colony were destroyed last year, in 3 years the honey bee will be extinct.

I do know it is bad though and do not mind exaggeration if that is what it takes to get noticed.
It is a serious problem. I am totally happy with round up to kill weeds.

If it is the possibility that insecticides like this is killing the honey bee population, we need to fix this.

I want to say I raise a garden, I have tomatoes, lettuce, cabbage, peas, onions and carrots, many herbs.
Same time, I seem to have something that whiptail lizards like.
They hide under the cabbage leafs for shade and shelter, I built them a little water trough to drink from without leaving the shade.
Before I made the trough, they licked the water off of the leaves of my plants.
If I use some insecticide to kill insects and the plant leafs are wet, the whiptails will drink it thinking it is water. Same with a honey bee coming by to pollinate my crop for me.

I am not some die hard animal activist, I think the lizards are cute and they run around like watch dogs eating insects and I do not want to harm them, the honey bees have their own place in my garden.

bobelectric 06-09-2013 08:02 PM

Sometimes I can get another 2 hours on an office building relamp by cleaning bugs from fixtures.

rossfingal 06-10-2013 12:45 PM

They don't really know what's causing the problems with honey bees.
Could be - pesticides, mites/parasites, climate change, air-born pollutants,
increased C02 - ????
Hope somebody figures it out!
If they don't -
watch what happens to food prices!!!
Ouch! :(

creeper 06-10-2013 12:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RWolff (Post 1198129)
I've mentioned ladybug bites to a friend and she said "ladybugs BITE?? since when?"
Since we imported a nasty strain of them and they got way out of hand, they come in the house thru the tiniest cracks, under the door, siding gaps, and many people are allergic to them- if they are crushed or disturbed they give off a substance that can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

Some also say they have a very unpleasant smell when crushed and the liquids also stain.

Here's the story on these, the bees are more of less the same kind of backstory:

I've noticed that these ladybugs do swarm inside in a huge number, but they are not aggressive and they tend to stick to the windows making elimination via vacuum very easy.

creeper 06-10-2013 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by funfool (Post 1198132)
Not sure where I fit in here. I have a small yarden with veggies and native plants, drip irrigation and is my hobby to get me outside and have fun.
In another forum we have talked about honey bee's a lot and aware of the problem.
I find it hard to believe that 1 out of 3 colony were destroyed last year, in 3 years the honey bee will be extinct.

I do know it is bad though and do not mind exaggeration if that is what it takes to get noticed.
It is a serious problem. I am totally happy with round up to kill weeds.

If it is the possibility that insecticides like this is killing the honey bee population, we need to fix this.

I want to say I raise a garden, I have tomatoes, lettuce, cabbage, peas, onions and carrots, many herbs.
Same time, I seem to have something that whiptail lizards like.
They hide under the cabbage leafs for shade and shelter, I built them a little water trough to drink from without leaving the shade.
Before I made the trough, they licked the water off of the leaves of my plants.
If I use some insecticide to kill insects and the plant leafs are wet, the whiptails will drink it thinking it is water. Same with a honey bee coming by to pollinate my crop for me.

I am not some die hard animal activist, I think the lizards are cute and they run around like watch dogs eating insects and I do not want to harm them, the honey bees have their own place in my garden.

Personally In my gardens I never use insecticide. Although totally impractical for the cash crop farmer. And I've learned which crops seem to be a little more resistant to attacks

Things like horn worms that attack tomatoes and Colorado beetles that attack potatoes can all be picked off by hand. Catch the eggs early by wiping off the underside of leaves.

Other bugs can be controlled with a little dishsoap and water in a spray bottle. But they need to be hit directly so diligence is required.

I've heard marigolds naturally repel invasions, plus they look nice

Or get a lizard or chicken like funfool suggests. But I wonder how farmers managed in years gone by without industrial strength pesticides

Maintenance 6 06-10-2013 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1197936)
Let's not jump on the 'imported insect' band wagon---
we have imported a few already and that did not work well--

Stronger African bees

Bigger stronger lady bugs

Memory fails me--but there have been other attempt at importing insects that backfired---

Funny you should say that.
American Honey bees are not native to America. They were imported in the 1600s.

creeper 06-10-2013 01:40 PM

As long as we are talking about things being imported and getting out of control, what about those crazy Asian Carps.

They are a huge threat to the Great lakes ecosystem. Take a look at this video, If you can stand listening to dufus for most of the way through, you will be rewarded...(no sooner said then done

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oc0kYOB0Mfs

RWolff 06-10-2013 11:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by creeper (Post 1198599)
I've noticed that these ladybugs do swarm inside in a huge number, but they are not aggressive and they tend to stick to the windows making elimination via vacuum very easy.


That's one thing a lady I know warned me against- vacuuming them if you have any allergy to them, for doing so will put the allergin particles into the air big time, she knows because she is allergic to the orange fluid they give off when frightened, or crushed.

What a STUPID stunt importing these damn things was!


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