DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Off Topic (http://www.diychatroom.com/f39/)
-   -   Experts--is there any "composite" siding that's better than Hardie plank? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f39/experts-there-any-composite-siding-thats-better-than-hardie-plank-70818/)

biggerdaddynj 05-08-2010 10:54 PM

Experts--is there any "composite" siding that's better than Hardie plank?
 
A friend who's in the home repair biz told me that Hardie plank is the way to go. Not interested in vinyl or wood, are there any other products I should be considering? Thanks!!! :)

Swanson52 05-09-2010 02:36 AM

When you say 'alternatives', do you mean other brands of fiber cement siding, or do you mean other types of siding altogether? The only other type of siding you didn't mention is steel/aluminum.

IMHO, HardiePlank has no equal when it comes to lap veneers. Hands down the best siding I have ever installed.:thumbsup:

biggerdaddynj 05-09-2010 11:43 AM

Thanks for the response Swanson!!! I've heard about one other composite (Certainteed?). However, seems like Hardie is the way to go. Didn't really think about steel/aluminum. Should I?? In regard to Hardie, I'm nervous based on what I've read in other posts (e.g., that you have to ensure the materials are kept extremely safe--installed with moisture and they'll bow, etc...). Also, read that you should use 7 not 6 or 8 (all Greek to me!). As a "mere" homeowner, I'm a little worried that I won't know what to look for to make sure the contractor is being careful while he's doing the job (will obviously check references). Want it done once and done right. Any general tips so I won't sound like I am what I am, i.e., totally clueless??? :laughing:
Thanks again!!!

Ron6519 05-09-2010 01:22 PM

This is kind of a personal taste issue and somewhat based on the house constructon. It would help if you mentioned what you have now or some pictures of the house.
Stucco would be possible with the siding items listed so far.
A simple search of "exterior siding choices", should get you a generous lising. A drive around the area will also give you a myriad of choices.
Composite materials are not a choice I would make. Hardie products are.
Ron

Tom Struble 05-09-2010 02:38 PM

there are more than just cement based products there's fiberglass,solid pvc,wood flour composites ,osb based,polyethylene....

hardie is a good product but it has its own issues

Swanson52 05-11-2010 05:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by biggerdaddynj (Post 439541)
Thanks for the response Swanson!!! I've heard about one other composite (Certainteed?). However, seems like Hardie is the way to go. Didn't really think about steel/aluminum. Should I?? In regard to Hardie, I'm nervous based on what I've read in other posts (e.g., that you have to ensure the materials are kept extremely safe--installed with moisture and they'll bow, etc...). Also, read that you should use 7 not 6 or 8 (all Greek to me!). As a "mere" homeowner, I'm a little worried that I won't know what to look for to make sure the contractor is being careful while he's doing the job (will obviously check references). Want it done once and done right. Any general tips so I won't sound like I am what I am, i.e., totally clueless??? :laughing:
Thanks again!!!

I personally have never seen Hardie wick up moisture resulting in a lack of structural integrity (the board itself), but that doesn't mean it can't/doesn't happen. I've just never seen it; I guess I've always kept mine dry or covered out of habit. :) That being said, if it is installed improperly and the siding is cracked or compromised, it WILL absorb water at the point of exposure.

When you refer to 6, 7, and 8, that is the 'reveal' or exposure of the siding (how much siding you see between the laps). 7" reveal (8.25" width overall) is the most common, and typically the most cost effective.

Also, be sure that the gaps where the ends butt are being properly treated. The preferred method is to install felt paper (or some type of flashing) behind the joint. However, I did break with the recommended installation here; while I did use the tar paper, I also put an aluminum 'joint cover' over the joint that was the same color as the siding. I thought it looked better than having the gaps, personally. I don't advocate doing this, as it is not the preferred method of installation per James Hardie, and I don't want to give advice contrary to what they say needs to be done (even though I never had any adverse results from doing so).

HTH.

biggerdaddynj 05-12-2010 10:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 439571)
This is kind of a personal taste issue and somewhat based on the house constructon. It would help if you mentioned what you have now or some pictures of the house.
Stucco would be possible with the siding items listed so far.
A simple search of "exterior siding choices", should get you a generous lising. A drive around the area will also give you a myriad of choices.
Composite materials are not a choice I would make. Hardie products are.
Ron


Ron--live in suburban north/central Jersey and have a split level house built in 1957 (with cedar siding). What do you think??? And by the way, thanks for responding!! :thumbup:

biggerdaddynj 05-12-2010 10:29 PM

Trying to be very careful with contractor selection. Called 2 local Hardie distributors and asked them for referrals of their high volume customers whom they trusted. Got 2 names from each. Hopefully, they were honest with their referrals (neither place asked me to tell them that they referred me--this leads me to believe they were above-board--when we were done, I thanked them and told them that I would mention to the contractors who referred me--since I thought they were honest, I figured I might as well let let 'em get some beer and wings or a bottle of scotch if I go with one of their guys). I also e-mailed Hardie and they gave me the name of their "preferred remodeler" for this area. I was hoping that this company might get better pricing from Hardie. Also, won't have to worry about warranty issues because they are guaranteed to install per Hardie's requirements.

sbmarcovsky 05-25-2010 11:05 AM

for biggerdaddynj
 
Hi! I also live in northern nj and I'm looking to replace my home with hardiplank fiber cement. I also live in a 1957 split! :) I originally started pricing out vinyl siding but would prefer hardiplank, if affordable. I'd love to know what you find out re. installers, etc. I'd be happy to share my info too when I have some to share!
Susan

Scuba_Dave 05-25-2010 12:48 PM

Moved to Off topic since not a DIY project

tpolk 05-25-2010 01:16 PM

where i see damage on hardiplank is where siding on a wall runs into another roof. the butt that gets cut to match the shingle rake of the roof if held to close will wick water and deteriorate. i always stay 1-1/2" off the roof and paint the cut edge, you can get matching touch up paint for their prefinished siding


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:04 AM.