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Old 07-15-2008, 06:02 PM   #1
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Canada


Is there anywhere in Canada where it doesn't get too cold (warmer than -20F) and the summers are reasonable (less than +90F)?

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Old 07-15-2008, 07:44 PM   #2
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British Columbia, especially the closer you get to the ocean... I am not 100% sure since I've never lived there, but my sister does...

Property values and living expenses are pretty high though.

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Old 07-15-2008, 08:17 PM   #3
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British Columbia, especially the closer you get to the ocean... I am not 100% sure since I've never lived there, but my sister does...
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Property values and living expenses are pretty high though.


Sounds good to me; I can't speak Spanish and Europe is too far.
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Old 07-15-2008, 08:43 PM   #4
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Canada


Especially the Annapolis Valley which has milder winters than even the rest of the province.

I grew up there. Great mild weather. Only problem is, the economy's not exactly booming -- more depressed and harder to find work than in BC but then again, real estate is much cheaper, too.
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Old 07-16-2008, 04:08 PM   #5
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Yeah, here's some more stuff.

http://www.britishcolumbia.com/information/details.asp?id=16

I wouldn't at all mind being near excellent skiing, too.
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Old 07-16-2008, 11:43 PM   #6
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Canada


Yoyizit:

But why do you want to move to Canada? Canadians talk different, they say "Eh" at the end of every sentance. "Eh" means something in between "know what I mean" and "R U listening?" It's used as a period and/or exclamation mark, eh. Canadian football has different rules, they kinda make them up as they go along. Canadian whiskey and cigarettes are more expensive, you can starve to death in Canada if you drink and smoke heavily. And Canadian beer tastes weird. In Canada you have to wait in line till you die for free health care, and the only ones with guns in Canada are criminals. In Canada, it's so hard for law abiding citizens to acquire a handgun legally that the only practical way of getting one is to buy a used one off a criminal.

Why come here?

Last edited by Nestor_Kelebay; 07-17-2008 at 12:57 AM.
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Old 07-17-2008, 08:40 AM   #7
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Canada


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Yoyizit:

But why do you want to move to Canada? Canadians talk different, they say "Eh" at the end of every sentance. "Eh" means something in between "know what I mean" and "R U listening?" It's used as a period and/or exclamation mark, eh. Canadian football has different rules, they kinda make them up as they go along. Canadian whiskey and cigarettes are more expensive, you can starve to death in Canada if you drink and smoke heavily. And Canadian beer tastes weird. In Canada you have to wait in line till you die for free health care, and the only ones with guns in Canada are criminals. In Canada, it's so hard for law abiding citizens to acquire a handgun legally that the only practical way of getting one is to buy a used one off a criminal.

Why come here?
The lesser of several evils?
Want better skiing?
Spectacular scenery?
Escape my creditors?
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Old 07-17-2008, 07:13 PM   #8
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Canada


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZHlrk19uRU&feature=related
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Old 07-17-2008, 11:48 PM   #9
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Canada


Yoyizit:

Those pictures are certainly not "typical" of Canada. Those are postcards from a dime store in tourist resort.

If you look at Canada on this web page:

http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/learningresources/theme_modules/borealforest/forest_regions.jpg/image_view

You'll see that almost all of Canada is covered by Boreal forest and tundra.

So, a truly "typical" picture of Canadian scenery would show:

1. a dense forest of coniferous trees that runs from one ocean across the country to the other with hardly any towns or villages in it, or

2. tundra, which is where only plants smaller than trees will grow because of the short growing season. You get bush, then only shrubs, and then only grass and moss as you get further north, until you end up with no vegitation at all, and all you got os rock, stones, sand and ice.



Can you imagine a few hundred thousand square miles of this?
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Old 07-18-2008, 04:55 PM   #10
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I guess it's uno, dos, tres for me
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Old 07-18-2008, 09:58 PM   #11
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Canada


however the tundra and boreal forest are the largely unpopulated areas... there is a wide variety of other landscapes in Canada that are much more friendly to live... (and they are generally more populated as well...)
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Old 07-18-2008, 10:49 PM   #12
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Canada


If you are not limited to Canada for some reason, you could consider someplace like Juneau, Alaska. They do not have cold and have one of the longest growing seasons as evidenced by the produce grown.

Not like cosmolpolitan like Vancouver, but very close to the the great parts of Alaska when you want to see them. It is also not easy to drive to, but there a lot of cruise ships around.
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Old 07-19-2008, 06:57 AM   #13
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Canada


...this month, of Champlain setting up a permanent post in Quebec. Mostly fur trading activity going on back then, between the French and the Indians. 29 people decided to make this their home and spend their first winter. Only 9 were left 6 months later. Started off what became Canada being a bicultural country.

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Old 07-19-2008, 07:30 PM   #14
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Ccarlisle:

Champlain landing in Quebec and establishing a colony there was really just another case of European countries wanting to grab a piece of the new world. At that time England, Spain, Holland and Portugal were grabbing pieces of North and South America, and I expect France wanted it's fair share of the spoils too. If Champlain hadn't established a colony at Quebec City, it would have only been a matter of time until some other European country claimed that chunk of North America for itself.

What made Canada a bicultural country was the British victory over the French at the Plains of Abraham. Instead of assimilating the French into the English language and culture, the English let the French keep their language, their Catholic religion and their French "Civil Code" legal system. As a result, "Lower Canada" retained it's French language, culture and a distinct legal system right up until negotiations began to confederate the various regions into a single country that would stretch all the way across the continent.

Had the English assimilated the French after their victory at the Plains of Abraham, there would have been only an English culture in Canada, and no separatist movement today.
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Old 07-19-2008, 08:57 PM   #15
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CANADA -

Three voyageurs or trappers loved the area and thought they should name it. They recognized that an abbreciated name would be best. So, they each put a slip of pare with a letter written on it, They then drew out the letters and read them aloud to get agreement -

The first letter and they it a was "C" eh?

The second was "N" eh?

The third was "D" eh?

that is where Canada (C eh, N eh, D eh) got its name - Maybe you have to be around Michigan (especially the U.P.) to get it where they have thraditional Ontario accent.

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