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Old 03-11-2008, 09:31 AM   #16
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Not at all; it's a combination of the two. Everybody I know just uses water anyway.

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Old 03-11-2008, 09:46 AM   #17
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Should I turn down the heat and cook the chicken longer to give it more soak time, or will that cause it to dry out easier?
The cut of meat will dictate the time, temp and placement on the grill.
Fish: medium direct heat
chicken breasts (boneless / skinless): medium or a little higher direct heat
chicken with bone in and skin on (esp. thighs and drummies): med low and turn frequently
pork chops: medium to medium high
beef (steaks, burgers, etc...): medium high to high direct heat
If you're doing meats with little fat like chicken or fish, give the grate a shot of non-stick spray before you heat it up or just rub it with oil on a paper towel to keep meat from sticking. Fattier cuts like beef don't need that treatment. They'll just kind of release from a seasoned grate when they're ready to turn.
Bigger cuts like roasts or whole birds can be cooked indirectly. That is over a burner that is turned way down or off. You'd use the other burner(s) to maintain your roasting temp, just like an oven.

Oh btw, I forgot to mention one thing about that Weber smoker, it does not come with a thermometer, which is essential. I equipped mine with high quality thermometers from TruTemp, but there are less spendy options out there. It's a shame that Weber doesn't include a thermometer, especially considering the price of the unit.
Probably the best single source of info on this cooker can be found here. The forum and the links across the top of the page were tremendously useful to me.

Last edited by kboorman; 03-11-2008 at 10:22 AM.
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Old 03-20-2008, 09:19 AM   #18
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Thank you for all the information KB.

I still have not bought a smoker but I still will for sure in the upcoming weeks. It has been cold and rainy here the past week or so, not beein top priority!

I am going to grill some bone-in chicken breasts tonight. I usually put seasoning all over them so once cooked the skin has a good flavor. But we are having guests and some people won't eat the skin. Is there anyway to impart more flavors into the actualy meat? It seems the skin block most of the seasoning flavor!

Thank you!
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Old 03-20-2008, 09:35 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Taipans View Post
Thank you for all the information KB.

I still have not bought a smoker but I still will for sure in the upcoming weeks. It has been cold and rainy here the past week or so, not beein top priority!

I am going to grill some bone-in chicken breasts tonight. I usually put seasoning all over them so once cooked the skin has a good flavor. But we are having guests and some people won't eat the skin. Is there anyway to impart more flavors into the actualy meat? It seems the skin block most of the seasoning flavor!

Thank you!

can't you just cook it with the skin and remove it to serve?
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Old 03-20-2008, 10:10 AM   #20
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If you're using a rub, or something similar: cut a small slit in the skin before cooking and rub the seasoning underneath the skin, being careful not to tear the skin off.

Liquid seasonings are even easier: Poke a hole in the skin large enough for a baster to fit in, and squirt your liquid inside.
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Old 03-20-2008, 10:10 AM   #21
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I usually put seasoning all over them so once cooked the skin has a good flavor. But we are having guests and some people won't eat the skin.
That's why you cook it with the skin on and then eat the skin when you get into the kitchen before you serve. When we rotisserie chickens on our grill, my wife and I fight each other for the skin and before it's served, it's usually stripped clean. lol
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Old 03-20-2008, 11:09 AM   #22
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That's why you cook it with the skin on and then eat the skin when you get into the kitchen before you serve. When we rotisserie chickens on our grill, my wife and I fight each other for the skin and before it's served, it's usually stripped clean. lol
If you don't "inject" or cut "slits" into the skin and allow the seasoning and juices to take into the meat how does it gain anything from the outside seasonings? Every time I tried to heavily season the skin it turns out boring on the inside. Not horrible, but just not bursting with flavor!
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Old 03-21-2008, 12:20 PM   #23
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Another question on BBQ methods,

I have heard of people pre-boiling chicken, then seasoning and grilling. This has a few advantages and one disadvantage.(blandness it seems)

I am sure most know them so I am going to get right to my question. I don't actually do this, I just grill the meat once seasoned right on the pit. I am afriad of making it very bland if I do the boil method.

But can you boil the chicken in a beer mixture first? I am thinking about so many different kinds that could impart awesome flavors to the meat. Then I could take it out, season / grill to give it that "grilled" flavor. And have great tender meat as well.

If people do this I was wondering if you boil it in 100% beer or a mixture of beer / water to dilute it some? Also what types of beer would compliment chicken the best?
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Old 03-21-2008, 05:32 PM   #24
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Q!

Now we're talkin'! While I don't have much time to post my "secrets" right now, I do have some important hints:

Practice (of course)

Don't use your family/guests as guinea pigs - test it yourself first

I LOVE garlic, but sometimes I take too much and get burnt out and the flavor suffers, so just remember how much you use.

Buy a self-cleaning grill (mine is HUGE, and for the price it should clean itself, but it doesn't.)

STOP OPENING THE GRILL TO CHECK ON IT! You let the valuable heat and flavor angels out. Put a padlock on it so you don't have other "looksees" doing it too.

Barbecue, BBQ, grilling, whatever ya call it properly - it takes time, you can't rush it. I still haven't met any Russians that don't burn meat.

Alcohol and cooking: Beer, wine, tequila, soda pop - if you don't like drinking it - YOU CAN'T COOK WITH IT. <---period. Use your best judgement here. The worst hot dogs are great soaked in good beer, well any beer come to think of it.

A secret I've learned with ribs (had a dream about this last night) bake 'em in rub and foil, and THEN fire em up on the grill. Baste with the carmelized rub. YUM!

Contrary to popular belief - Searing the meat first does not seal in the flavor or juices. I've seen too many pre-seared bland hockey pucks.

Save those spikey-scratchy grill brushes for the park. If you loved your grill, you'd scrub it properly after every use. I thought about rubbing a coat of wax on the outside...

The internet is full of recipes. People have theirs and their methods. You can't steal, but you can perfect and make some of them your own. What? You think I'm gonna tell you?
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Old 03-22-2008, 11:05 AM   #25
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Contrary to popular belief - Searing the meat first does not seal in the flavor or juices. I've seen too many pre-seared bland hockey pucks.
Alton Brown on Good Eats actually proved to the contrary, well at least as far as juices go. They took some steaks about as identical as they could get them, weighed them, and cooked them. Some of them they seared, and the others they didn't. When they got done cooking them, the ones that they seared first weighed more which he concluded meant that more of the juices were still inside. Granted this wasn't conducted by NASA, but it's food for thought. Pun intended.
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Old 03-22-2008, 12:00 PM   #26
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Alton Brown on Good Eats actually proved to the contrary, well at least as far as juices go. They took some steaks about as identical as they could get them, weighed them, and cooked them. Some of them they seared, and the others they didn't. When they got done cooking them, the ones that they seared first weighed more which he concluded meant that more of the juices were still inside. Granted this wasn't conducted by NASA, but it's food for thought. Pun intended.
Other way around. The non-seared steaks weighed more.
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Old 03-22-2008, 02:16 PM   #27
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Oh yeah, upon further review, I think he said that the non-seared were juicier, but the seared tasted better. Too many Good Eats episodes out there to try to find the one I was thinking of. lol
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Old 03-24-2008, 12:03 PM   #28
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Thank you for all the information KB...

Is there anyway to impart more flavors into the actualy meat? It seems the skin block most of the seasoning flavor!
No sweat! Like I said, I love to talk bbq and grilling.
As far as getting more flavor in the meat, you could always brine it before grilling if you have the time. It's a good way to impart flavor and moisture, which is a big plus when you're doing white meat chicken. A standard brine is 1 cup of kosher salt (or 2/3 cup table salt), one cup of brown sugar to one gallon of ice cold water. There's a lot of variation too, like apple honey brine or citrus brine. A quick web search will yield some good recipes but just be sure they have a similar ratio of sweet, salt and water.
Chicken parts should be immersed from 4-6 hrs, whole chickens up to 12 and turkeys a full 24 hrs. I do mine in a 5 gallon cooler (the bucket type with the spicket) and I don't have to add any more ice during the brining process.
Grill the chicken like normal after that, saucing at the end to prevent burning, and you're all set.
HTH, Kirk

Last edited by kboorman; 03-24-2008 at 12:13 PM.
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Old 03-24-2008, 12:11 PM   #29
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...I have heard of people pre-boiling chicken, then seasoning and grilling...
Blasphemy! Don't do it man!
That might be ok for brats or some other sausage but not for chicken. Turn down the heat and let it cook longer, turning as necessary, or let it spend some time over indirect heat. That way the inside gets done same time as the outside.
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Old 03-24-2008, 12:23 PM   #30
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Oh yeah, upon further review, I think he said that the non-seared were juicier, but the seared tasted better. Too many Good Eats episodes out there to try to find the one I was thinking of. lol
It's all in preference, like bones in T-bones an Porterhouses compared to sirloin. Some people like the boney taste. I hate carbonized "well-done" meat. If I sear I'm gonna slow-roast or broil at a lower teperature to protect the inside. My first real job was dishwasher, so I got to eat the mistakes and scrub the crusty pans (searing and sautee-ing too hot). I ended up teaching the new cooks how to cook! Method over recipe. Short order and preparing a formal dinner while doing dishes and cleaning up after people was probably one of the hardest and rewarding jobs I've ever had. Didn't pay very well, but I still respect my boss at the time to this day for the things I learned. The only better cook/teacher was Mom.

Alton Brown is truely a kitchen chemist! He's one of the people who turned me on to a few of the Kosher secrets in cooking, some of which I think should be standard, even though I am far from being Jewish (Oye Ve and how!). It's more about traditional magic than rules or religion. Alton teaches that if the "love" isn't there to taste you can fake it with science, and, of course, some things just don't taste good!



The grill is much more than just a grate over fire - you must earn the love. Cook from the heart, for your heart.

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