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Old 03-18-2009, 11:39 AM   #1
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Greetings from an old newbie. :)


I'm beginning a long planned "gut and rebuild" for a 1940's farmhouse with concrete block perimeter walls. The primary goal is to rebuild the interior with high insulation standards and make use of southern exposure to get passive solar heating as much as possible. The secondary goal is to make use of the resulting thick walls to create the impression the house was built in 1750's. There will be one two story addition, on the north side, with a garage below and master bedroom/bathroom above.

On the exterior I plan to use a real stone veneer on the original portion of the house, Hardi plank on the addition, to make it look like local German colonial farmhouses.

My dad and grandfather were both contractors (business founded in 1904) but I have only dabbled in the field since high school (1972). Lots of the things I was taught are no longer valid with modern materials and techniques, but I've been reading/studying over the years and hope to apply that knowledge to this house.

We're about at the end of the "gut" portion of the job. One or two ceilings still have to come down (putting PEX in the second floor for heat), and I have to remove a multilayer mess in the kitchen floor.

I'm leaning towards just ripping the floor out, down to the joists, and starting over at this point. (Black tar paper glued to deteriorated pine floor, no subfloor, two layers of floor tile, a layer of sheet vinyl, a layer of luan and another layer of sheet vinyl) I'd leave it in place except that the PO left two dogs and two goats living in the house on their own for two months. Urine has soaked down through all these layers and the wife just doesn't want a kitchen that smells like a barnyard/kennel for some reason...

Cutting up the floor in sections with the sawzall seems like it would create the least amount of dust and get the job done the quickest. Once the floor is up, there's a concrete cistern about 6" below the joists. I will clean this up and make use of it for non-potable garden watering, etc.) I intend to put Kilz odor killer on the joists, blue board atop the cistern and around the perimeter, then PEX along the joists before I re-lay new sub floor. All the wiring and plumbing will be outside this area. Am I missing anything?

There is no inspection required for anything I do inside the existing house, so I don't want to make any dumb moves here since there's nobody to "catch" me at it.

Looking forward to learning a lot and lending whatever info I glean from this experience.

Thanks!

Doug

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Old 03-18-2009, 12:11 PM   #2
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Greetings from an old newbie. :)


Here's a frontal shot of my "blank canvas" as it appeared last spring. Looks about the same now, on the outside.
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Old 03-19-2009, 03:41 PM   #3
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Greetings from an old newbie. :)


Sounds like a lot of work o-o; good luck with that ^w^/
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Old 03-19-2009, 10:46 PM   #4
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Greetings from an old newbie. :)


Hi Doug, I'm looking forward to hearing about your progress and seeing the pictures. We (5 bros., 1 sis. and I) gutted our mom's 1895 house starting in 2000. What a job it was! Luckily we took lots of pictures, because when it was all done, it was hard to remember what it looked like before.

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Once the floor is up, there's a concrete cistern about 6" below the joists.
We found one below the kitchen floor too. One of many surprises in and under the house. A porch was added on, which became part of the kitchen years later, before we moved in. We never knew the cistern was there.

Enjoy your renovation and welcome to the forum.

Last edited by gma2rjc; 03-26-2009 at 10:18 PM.
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Old 03-20-2009, 06:22 AM   #5
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Greetings from an old newbie. :)


I appreciate the warm welcomes!

It's going to be a big year but I know we can make it with a little elbow grease.

Looking forward to sharing the progress and results with you all here.

Hi ho, hi ho, it's off to work I go...

Doug
www.dougdobbs.com
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Old 03-26-2009, 10:05 PM   #6
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Greetings from an old newbie. :)


You'll have to post pictures, Doug. This sounds like an incredible amount of work! Do you have help?
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Old 03-27-2009, 03:31 AM   #7
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Greetings from an old newbie. :)


Yep, I've got friends who will help with things from time to time. We're doing a work day on April 4 to pull down the ceiling in the dining room and foyer. I've started on the kitchen floor removal. Between a Hole Hog and a Sawzall, it's going along pretty well. The floor is a full 2" thick, 5/4" poplar plank subfloor with 3/4" pine finish floor. Hate to cut the stuff up, but couldn't see any way around it at this point. It burns real good though.

Here are a few shots of what I'm working with.

http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/...ome-and-garden

Enjoy the journey with me, and please feel free to offer any advice or insight you might have.

Doug
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Old 03-27-2009, 07:56 AM   #8
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Greetings from an old newbie. :)


Great pictures Doug. I was surprised to see the shot of the cistern. Ours was just a big round hole about 9' deep and 6' wide with a cement coating the sides of it. No lid.
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Old 03-29-2009, 11:24 AM   #9
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Greetings from an old newbie. :)


GMA,

Advances in cistern technology, I guess. This one was built in 1946. I'm surprised at how solid the cistern roof is, unsupported, across that span. Once we get it pumped out and cleaned up I intend to route the leaders into it again and use it for non-potable house and garden uses. Makes a nice 5,000 gallon reserve in case of emergencies too.

More pix as things progress. I've been in bed with a nasty case of bronchitis the last five days but am starting to pull out of it and hope to get back over there later this week.

Doug

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