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vedman 04-22-2013 03:09 PM

Can't be a bigger rookie than me
 
Hi there,

I would like to get into DIY more to save money and learn a few useful things. I would like to get better at fixing every day home stuff like clogs and such. What is the best way to start?

TheEplumber 04-22-2013 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vedman (Post 1164993)
Hi there,

I would like to get into DIY more to save money and learn a few useful things. I would like to get better at fixing every day home stuff like clogs and such. What is the best way to start?

Welcome!
I vaguely remember an old Dagwood comic- They had a cookie jar filled with honey do's. He had to pick one out and get 'er done.
I suggest the same. Make a list of "necessary items" and a "wish list" and have at it.
Lurk and search around here and absorb the info- ask questions when you want. The folks here are very helpful.
One thing that would help is adding your general location to to your user profile.

ddawg16 04-22-2013 03:54 PM

Welcome vedman.....

Follow Eplumbers advice.....and start reading some of the posts.....you will quickly find out that maybe your not the biggest rookie here....

av1611 04-22-2013 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vedman (Post 1164993)
Hi there,

I would like to get into DIY more to save money and learn a few useful things. I would like to get better at fixing every day home stuff like clogs and such. What is the best way to start?

Black and Decker Books, you can
sometimes get them at a discount
store like Ollies with typo's.

forcedreno2012 04-22-2013 05:05 PM

Welcome Vedman

We all started somewhere I am still in the learning process myself. The advice that you can get on this site is incredible. Still amazes me just how much time people are willing to give. You have definitely come to the right place.

Just a note on the books and I am not referencing any brand, just check to make sure if buying used books that they have not been recalled. I know there are some wiring ones that were pulled. A simple google search will help you out if you are unsure.

RJ

oldhouseguy 04-22-2013 07:06 PM

Start with smaller projects and work at your comfort level.

Everybody is still learning, because even the best of the best at one trade might still be lost when it comes to another trade.

Some guys are awesome at everything they do, not me!

Good luck! Read, read, read, read, and read some more and when you think you have it figured out, read even some more.

Collect opinions, weed them out and go with those that compare favorably with your own reading.

joecaption 04-22-2013 07:38 PM

I have stacks of books and magizines I've never even looked at.
Today you can find any info you could even needs with just a few taps on the keyboard.
Can even watch a vidio on YouTube for free on just about any subject on the planet.

r0ckstarr 04-22-2013 09:41 PM

I'm a graduate from the school of Google with a Masters in Youtube.

joecaption 04-22-2013 09:48 PM

But ha if you want to buy some books I'll sell mine cheap.

Catdaddyxx 04-23-2013 06:37 AM

I've started getting the black and decker books in the electronic variety for my tablet. I've been pleased with them myself. Might give them a look.

oldhouseguy 04-23-2013 06:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1165211)
I have stacks of books and magizines I've never even looked at.
Today you can find any info you could even needs with just a few taps on the keyboard.
Can even watch a vidio on YouTube for free on just about any subject on the planet.


I agree you can find many, many good videos.

The only problem is, as a rookie, how do you really know the video is any good?

Anyone with internet access and a cell phone can post a video with little or no regard as to whether or not the information is accurate.

With books, electronic format or printed, you at least know that the publisher spent some money to produce it, usually taking the care to have it fact checked through several layers of people.

When I suggest to read, I was also referring to past threads on this forum and others. I should have clarified that.

r0ckstarr 04-23-2013 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldhouseguy (Post 1165446)
I agree you can find many, many good videos.

The only problem is, as a rookie, how do you really know the video is any good?

Anyone with internet access and a cell phone can post a video with little or no regard as to whether or not the information is accurate.

With books, electronic format or printed, you at least know that the publisher spent some money to produce it, usually taking the care to have it fact checked through several layers of people.

When I suggest to read, I was also referring to past threads on this forum and others. I should have clarified that.

Don't just watch one video over something you are wanting to learn how to do. After you watch a few videos over the same subject, you start getting a better idea. From there, google the techniques they use and other techniques, or keywords of what they're doing. Also search here.

Then, google for how-to articles (text and pictures) and compare to the videos you saw and everything else you read. Use your best judgement to determine what's the best approach while keeping safety in mind. If you're still unsure, then it's best to get a group opinion from those that have already done it (here).

ddawg16 04-23-2013 08:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1165316)
But ha if you want to buy some books I'll sell mine cheap.

Your only selling them because your eye site is so bad now from old age......(have any on DIY houses?)


Vedman....besides here, there is lots of info on the web....but be cautious about 'how to' videos that are pushing a particular brand. They are going to say "This is the best way" because they want you to buy their product...there are exceptions....Kerdi is one that comes to mind....except for price, you won't hear anything bad about it....

Anyway....read the posts....after awhile you will see who the experts are in each field...

JoeCaption - jack of all trades...at his age, been around long enough to have done it all..

TheEplumber - Plumbing....

Daniel Holzman - A REAL engineer....

BeenThere - HVAC stuff....

BigJim - Another old guy who has seen tools we only see in a museum...I think he knows how to cut wood....

JazMan - Floors....specifically tile......

Gary in WA - Has more links to stuff than I have to jeep sites...don't know how it keeps up with them...

Oh'Mike - Still trying to figure out what he does....

FrenchElectrician - Knows electrons on both sides of the Atlantic....just one of many electrical guys here....

So, basically, when you see the above guys write something...your getting a straight answer.....

I know I've left out some guys.....but stick around long enough...you will get to know them.....

Nailbags 04-23-2013 09:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vedman (Post 1164993)
Hi there,

I would like to get into DIY more to save money and learn a few useful things. I would like to get better at fixing every day home stuff like clogs and such. What is the best way to start?

research is one of the first steps coming here is part of it. second learn to be mechanical, Try and learn all you can about everything that goes in to home construction. I guess that falls under research too.
3 Don't be afraid to really screw things up. It is going to happen so don't worry.

r0ckstarr 04-23-2013 10:55 AM

I like to follow a rule that helps with mistakes. :)

Every time you make a mistake, have a beer and rethink your strategy.


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