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Old 12-15-2009, 12:53 PM   #1
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will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?


I have a very old craftsman compressor i just purchased. It's operating pressure is 100psi and supposidly from a random part sheet i found online may have a max operating pressure of 125.
It has the control to shutoff when it reaches it's appropriate psi level however the reading gauge does not have any psi numbers, just an 'operating range' with a needle that points to various locations within a v-shaped area but nothing else to indicate what this means; other than to tell the motor to shut off after a period of time.
so, what I want to do is the following:
right now, the compressor has a pipe leading out of the tank with a fitting at the end to prevent air from escaping until a host is connected.
I want to take off that end piece and replace it with a few parts; those being:
-an in-line PSI gauge that would read the pressure in the tank, this would mean the pipe coming out of the tank would always be open up to this gauge.
-a tee after the psi-gauge so that I can connect two hoses to the compressor if/when necessary - each controlled by a shut-off ball-valve. (should not be a problem with 6 scfi @ 90 psi)
-after the shutoff valve i would like another PSI gauge that would read PSI so when either of the sides are open, there would be a reading for each line. presumably though, this reading would be the same as the first gauge i mentioned, so this might be a waste
-finally, on each side there would be the piece that prevents air from comming out until a host is connected.
Is this a safe project? i.e. can these types of parts withstand a consistent pressure or are they intended only for when air is moving only?
I am not intending to remove the pipe coming out of the tank, just the piece that connects to the pipe that stops air from coming out until a hose is connected and the expand from there.
so the goal is to read the pressure in the tank, and hoses if they will be different. (actually, there is a plus to this if I install psi regulators on each side to accomodate specific tool requirements, if this makes sense)
-i assume not to mess with this until all air is out of the compressor; it's safe when little to no air is flowing out?
-is it safe to release air from the tank in cold weather?
-did any concerns come up as you were reading this?
-i use teflon tape for threads? same used for plumbing?

Thanks for your time.

Last edited by capslock; 12-15-2009 at 12:58 PM.
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Old 12-15-2009, 02:58 PM   #2
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will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?


I would drain the air from the tank and replace the current gauge with one that displays the actual pressure. I would then remove your quick disconnect and install a pressure regulator, then reinstall the disconnect.

Teflon tape is fine on the joints, just leave the first thread unwrapped. Excessive use can cause a piece to get in the air and clog a gun.
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Old 12-15-2009, 02:58 PM   #3
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will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?


This sounds much like an older 20 gallon Craftsman compressor I had years ago. The pressure gauge which came with the compressor can be changed with no problem. IF you know that it is a 125 psi max compressor, I would use nothing less than a 160 psi gauge or actually a 200 psi gauge. The compressor's "cut-in/cut-out" switch will control when the compressor comes on and shuts down, the gauge is irrelevant as to the compressors starting and stopping. Instead of adding all of that "stuff" on the end of the discharge piping, why not build up a manifold with a short piece of hose that will attach to a female quick-disconnect mounted on the compressor? This will eliminate all of that weight and possibly breaking the pipe nipple. Then you can add what you wish to the other end of the manifold. Thanks, David
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Old 12-16-2009, 01:22 PM   #4
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will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?


hi thurman,

good ideas / points about the manifold.

Right, it is an older craftsman 20gal belt driven compressor. I'm not sure about your assessment that the pressure gauge that is attached to the compressor can be replaced as easily as you say. I am going to have to try to post a couple pictures if I can, but this 'gauge' is embedded into a larger part where the electrical goes into, the on/off switch is part of this and looks like it regulates how the compressor shuts on and off.
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Old 12-16-2009, 02:07 PM   #5
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will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?


Everything you mentioned will work. I would do this: Make a pipe manifold with the following and mount it to a wall above the compressor. Start with a male air hose fitting into a ball valve. A nipple from the valve into a Tee. Top of the Tee thread in a pressure gauge. A nipple out the right side of this Tee into an air drier. A nipple from the drier to a Tee. Bottom of the tee install a female chuck. Right side of the tee into a nipple into a pressure regulator. A nipple from the regulator to a female chuck. The ball valve will allow you to close off the supply. The first air chuck will deliver tank pressure, while the secoond will deliver regulated pressure. The drier will help to keep the moisture out of your lines and equipment and the whole set up is relatively cheap and easy to assemble. You can use black pipe and fittings for everything. Use 1/2". You should be able to easily get a drier and regulator with 1/2" thread. Use a regulator with a gauge. If you need to make your compressor portable, unchuck it from the manifold. If you ever upgrade to a larger compressor, the manifold will still work.

Last edited by Maintenance 6; 12-16-2009 at 02:12 PM.
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Old 12-16-2009, 06:23 PM   #6
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will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?


A guy on another forum got this set up off ebay for $30.

will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?-ar.jpg
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Old 12-16-2009, 06:40 PM   #7
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will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?


This is a link to a pdf on how to install airlines.

http://www.tptools.com/statictext/ai...ng-diagram.pdf
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Old 12-17-2009, 06:51 PM   #8
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will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?


Quote:
I'm not sure about your assessment that the pressure gauge that is attached to the compressor can be replaced as easily as you say. I am going to have to try to post a couple pictures if I can, but this 'gauge' is embedded into a larger part where the electrical goes into,
Ayuh,.... I've never seen an air pressure gauge that wasn't Screwed in, 1 way or another,...
Probably 1/8" pipe thread, maybe 1/4" pipe...
You might have to take something apart to get to it though...
A Picture sure would help...

I like the divorced manifold idea,..
I've got 3 little compressors and each is manifolded(is that a word) on the machine...
My main shop compressor has 1 valved tank pressure line,+ a valved regulated line...

You've gotta be careful if you Paint with a manifold like the 1 brokenknee posted,...
Even when drawing air from the center fitting, by-passing the tool oiler,...
You've gotta use a dedicated painting hose,... Your tool hoses will be comtaminated with oil...
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Old 12-18-2009, 07:05 AM   #9
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will new parts connecting to an air compressor hold steady pressure without failing?


Quote:
Originally Posted by brokenknee View Post
A guy on another forum got this set up off ebay for $30.

Attachment 15541
If you are going to use an oiler like the one in the picture, valve it off from your regular supply manifold. Mark your dedicated air chuck and air hose for the oiled line and don't use it for anything else.
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