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-   -   Table saw new vs upgrade (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/table-saw-new-vs-upgrade-165593/)

cjohnsonmn 12-04-2012 05:02 PM

Table saw new vs upgrade
 
For about $400 I can get a new "remanufactured" Ridgid 10" R4512. Or for $375 I can get a used "3HP" 10" Craftsman model 113-298762 with a brand new Vega Pro 50 fence system. What will be the better way to go for a beginning woodworker with plans to do a oak staircase and some basic cabinetry and trim work?

joecaption 12-04-2012 06:25 PM

Stairs and trim really should be done with a mitre saw not a table saw.
I guess you could do the work on a table saw but that will get old real quick having to go back and forth.

SeniorSitizen 12-04-2012 06:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cjohnsonmn (Post 1066311)
For about $400 I can get a new "remanufactured" Ridgid 10" R4512. Or for $375 I can get a used "3HP" 10" Craftsman model 113-298762 with a brand new Vega Pro 50 fence system. What will be the better way to go for a beginning woodworker with plans to do a oak staircase and some basic cabinetry and trim work?

The type of drive system would be the deciding factor for me. The older V-belt driven from a hinged motor at the rear of the saw vs some new cost cutting brain storm idea.

Don't put too much weight the 3HP claim unless the motor is capable of 240V wiring.

funfool 12-04-2012 07:22 PM

You will want both, a chop saw and a table saw for stair treads .... and a router, jigsaw, 1/2" drill, brad gun, finish gun .....:whistling2: clamps, grinder ... you need all the toys for stairs.

I am not familiar with the rigid, that craftsman saw has been around forever.
Did a quick google search on the model number, is same saw we have at the shop, is same saw most woodworkers I know, have in their shop.
I would have same saw myself, but I need it to be portable and carry my saw in my van.
The craftsman is to heavy and is a pain to move from job to job as needed, but if taken care of, craftsman could be the last table saw you ever buy.

The best improvements you can do to a table saw, first is a better fence, they can be expensive, yours comes with a improved fence, good chance will not be able to get as good of fence for the rigid, not sure though.

I am voting for the craftsman :thumbsup:

ddawg16 12-04-2012 07:31 PM

Based on what you want to do now....I would hold off on the table saw and go with a good compound sliding miter saw....it's as good if not better than a radial arm saw and much more flexible.

If your set on a table saw....I'd go with the Craftsman due to a greater selection of accessories....but before you do....look at Delta and Ryobi....

oh'mike 12-04-2012 07:39 PM

Table saw opinions/comments - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

They are discussing the saw you mentioned---a picture would help---with either saw--the size of the table and the quality of the fence are the deal makers---

ddawg16 12-04-2012 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1066410)
Table saw opinions/comments - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

They are discussing the saw you mentioned---a picture would help---with either saw--the size of the table and the quality of the fence are the deal makers---

Ditto......

And....don't be afraid to spend $50 or more on a blade....you can have the best table saw in the world and it will be worthless if you put a POS blade on it.

funfool 12-04-2012 08:30 PM

Have to ask which came first, chicken or the egg?
Way I read the post, cjohnsonnm wants to build some cabinets and later some stairs.

Any way you look at it, you want both a table saw and a chop saw.
Although, I can do more with a table saw then a chop saw, the chop saw is faster, the table saw is more versatile. Although much slower to setup.

Reminds me of a question I was once asked, think I will make a off topic post and ask it here in this forum.

MT Stringer 12-04-2012 08:37 PM

I have an old 1977 Craftsman table saw. It is not a 3hp saw or near it. The fence was bad so I installed a Vega Pro 40 fence system. It made the saw same like a new one. Perfect cuts, no burning or anything. The fence made a BIG difference.

However, my hobby has grown to where I need a bigger, badder saw . The Craftsman can't handle the 2 inch maple. :-(

So, in your case., I vote for the Craftsman with the Vega fence. Should be a good combination for you.
Mike

jeffsw6 12-04-2012 09:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cjohnsonmn (Post 1066311)
For about $400 I can get a new "remanufactured" Ridgid 10" R4512. Or for $375 I can get a used "3HP" 10" Craftsman model 113-298762 with a brand new Vega Pro 50 fence system. What will be the better way to go for a beginning woodworker with plans to do a oak staircase and some basic cabinetry and trim work?

Did you spend much time thinking about how often you will use your table saw, and where you are going to put it in your shop? If you have limited space, you really will want a saw you can move out of the way when you're not using it.

Ultimately, I bought an R4512 and the included wheel kit was a big selling point for me. I could afford a brand new 3HP saw with 52" fence if I wanted one, but I just do not have the extra floor space for a nice tool like that. I would have to get an add-on wheel kit and even when it's just pushed against a wall, it would eat up valuable space.

My R4512 turned out to be a dud (see my thread about having trouble getting it to square up) but I am probably just going to exchange it for another R4512. Would I like to have a 3HP 52" saw? Heck yeah, who wouldn't?! But I would need a bigger shop to hold it, or I would have to get rid of some other tools to make room.

Also the posters talking about needing a miter saw also, I never even had an "electric miter saw" when I learned about woodworking. I had to do stuff like that by hand. It never occurred to me until recently, how useful a miter saw can be if you just mount it on something that has a fence or a place for stop blocks. For long pieces, it is way easier than a table saw and more accurate than a circular saw. For long cuts, though, you will not find much use for your miter saw because it can only make a cut so long, like a radial arm saw.

So you should think about all of the tools you need or want, and try to prioritize which ones will be most useful. For me, this meant I wanted a table saw, miter saw, a drill press, and a router. I'd like to have a planer but I can borrow one from a friend.

cjohnsonmn 12-04-2012 11:15 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Thanks for all the great advice! The reason I put the 3HP in quotes is that Craftsman is really 1.5hp - the label on the front must be referring to peak hp or something that doesnt count as false advertising:whistling2:. I really thought everyone was gonna tell me to go for the new Ridgid, when I got home just now with the craftsman - (guy called earlier and I had to decide on the $75 on first refusal otherwise it would have been gone.) Whew! The fence is in the mail from Amazon now that I read the advice - getting that for $260 on sale + 40 shipping. I also didnt mention that I've been assembling my future woodshop over the last 7-10 years bit by bit - plus lumber and material. (got a Masterforce drill press last summer, Ridged compound miter saw the year before, Ryobi router and bench table 4 years ago and clamps, planes, nailers, handtools etc before that. The last item is a big antique Cresent 8" jointer for $200 I'll pay off and pick up this weekend. Now my unfinished basement is full and ready to finish for my fiance and me so I guess I'll be building a outbuilding shop/garage when I can afford that next. I'll have to keep half the basement as a shop in the meantime. Basement appartment and front porch first. Hoping I can build kitchen and bath cabinet frames with this setup and maybe just buy door and drawer faces? I'm sure I'll be asking lots of question here, so thanks again for havin me as a member and helping me out! That is a picture of the model craftsman but not the one I bought - no rust on mine and the original fence...

ddawg16 12-04-2012 11:19 PM

Nope....your not ready yet.....add to your list....Biscut cutter and Pocket Hole cutter....trust me....you want those items if your going to be making cabinets.....

jeffsw6 12-05-2012 05:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cjohnsonmn (Post 1066569)
Hoping I can build kitchen and bath cabinet frames with this setup and maybe just buy door and drawer faces?

It seems like you own the necessary tools to make your faces if you want to. Whether or not it would be cheaper than simply buying them, I don't know, I guess it depends on what kind of wood you want.

The way I learned to do everything was with limited tools. Never had a joiner. This youtube video shows a very fast way to make drawers that are durable though, with tools you already have (router) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMDNgFqyBLo

Cheap drawers will not last long. My house is full of them, and some that are less than 10 years old are falling apart. Whoever made these cabinets was obviously "the lowest bidder" and not a quality cabinet-maker. Cabinets are all about labor though, and if you are making your own, you can decide to make them as good as you want. I don't know a better way to attach a drawer front than a dovetail joint.


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