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Old 05-27-2013, 02:15 AM   #1
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single vs dual tank compressor


Hi all

I am looking for buying a entry level compressor. I was wondering if a 3 gallon single tank or a 4 gallon dual tank would have beter performance given they both have the same horse power and SCFM.

Thanks much

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Old 05-27-2013, 05:52 AM   #2
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single vs dual tank compressor


4 gallons is more than 3 gallons so the dual 4 gallon will have more reserve than the 3. Either way the 4 is more but is it 2 4 gallon tanks or 3 tanks equaling 4 gallons?

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Old 05-27-2013, 09:07 AM   #3
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single vs dual tank compressor


A lot depends on what you plan on doing with it.
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Old 05-27-2013, 09:13 AM   #4
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single vs dual tank compressor


If your looking at that size....I would look at the pancake compressors....chances are you want it to run a small nailer...or air up tires....you won't be painting your house or using a sand blaster with it.

One very important point....noise.....the oil less units tend to make a lot of noise....I had a 35 gal upright with an oil less compressor on top...yea, it had a lot of air but took a long time to get there...and man was it noise....the neighbors were glad when it died....so was I. I now have a 'real' compressor....so with the money.
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:33 AM   #5
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single vs dual tank compressor


Quote:
Originally Posted by bcgfdc3 View Post
4 gallons is more than 3 gallons so the dual 4 gallon will have more reserve than the 3. Either way the 4 is more but is it 2 4 gallon tanks or 3 tanks equaling 4 gallons?
the dual tank 4 gallon = 2 tanks of 2 gallon each (total 4)
single tank 3 gallon = 1 tank of 3 gallon (bigger tank)
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:36 AM   #6
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single vs dual tank compressor


I plan on using it for installing baseboards, crown moulding, and smaller wood framing projects.

I didn't know the oil free compressor was making more noise. Thanks for the info. I was actually look for oil free since I wont use it often and I thought oil free are less maintenance.

Thanks
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:42 AM   #7
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single vs dual tank compressor


Oil bath compressors have a longer life that the oilless brothers---

Unless you tip them over or forget to check the oil level---I use oil bath in the shop--and oilless on the jobs----

Shop compressor is old enough to vote---typical life for my portables is about 2 years.
They live a rough life so I'm okay with two years.
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Old 05-27-2013, 06:00 PM   #8
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for crown moulding, is there a electric nailer that can shoot long enough nails?
It's more practical than carrying a heavy compressor.
I saw those Paslode nailers at Home Depot, but they are rather expensive and I might not need all that extra power.

Thanks
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Old 05-27-2013, 06:06 PM   #9
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single vs dual tank compressor


A small compressor will power brad and finish guns very well----they do not use much volume of air.

I have a baby compressor that puts out 2.8 CFMs---that midsized unit will also work for larger framing and flooring guns, if you are not in a hurry---

The dual tanks units put out 4 cfms at 90 psi---and can be used with two guns and hoses---
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Old 05-27-2013, 06:36 PM   #10
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I was looking at models that are entry level and output 2.4 scfm at 90psi. This should be plenty enough for my use.
But I was also thinking since I am using for light applications, there might be some good electrical (corded) nailer would enough power and easier to cary around and store.
Any recommendation?
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Old 05-28-2013, 08:04 AM   #11
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single vs dual tank compressor


The primary information to look for when sizing an air compressor to a tool, or vice versa, is X scfm at Y psi. As an example, the compressors that you are looking at with air delivery of 2.4 scfm at 90 psi would theoretically power a nailer that requires up to somethng like 2.2 scfm at 90 psi. All of these numbers are subjective in that air leaks at couplers, length of hose, quality of the air tool, and other factors contribute to the efficeincy or ineffeciency of the system. Speaking of air hose, air compressors consume a lot of enegy, and should not be run on extension cords if at all avoidable, so the key is to have plenty of air hose to reach from the compressor to the point of use. As for air tank size, well, there is a science to it, but there are so many circumstances to consider that, for general use, I would not make that a determining factor.
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Old 05-28-2013, 11:25 AM   #12
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single vs dual tank compressor


Thanks Dexter. One thing I failed to understand is why compressors have higher SCFM at lower PSI? It seems like the higher the pressure, the more "force" will get out of that hose.

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