DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Tools (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/)
-   -   Router & Jigsaw Suggestions for a DIY'er starting out.. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/router-jigsaw-suggestions-diyer-starting-out-148633/)

hboogz 06-29-2012 05:27 PM

Router & Jigsaw Suggestions for a DIY'er starting out..
 
i keep being told getting a router to make hinge depth cuts on doors is the way to go. I'd love to learn to do it by hand from a carpenter, but the fact that I don't have access to one makes that a bit difficult. That being said, what would be a good router for some basic woodworking ( beyond the hinge depth cuts) ? I have a few saved on ebay but when it comes to this tool, i really don't know what would be a good fit to start.

Same holds true for a jigsaw. I'm increasing finding it necessary where maneuverability is needed inside a piece of wood.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ryobi-2-HP-P...#ht_1895wt_922
http://www.ebay.com/itm/380450219020...ht_2242wt_1396

Daniel Holzman 06-29-2012 06:12 PM

Not sure I would buy a router from ebay, but to each their own. There are plunge routers and fixed base routers, each has its benefits. I own one of each. The plunge router is great for positioning the bit over a specific place on the workpiece, then plunging the tool into the wood to get started. The fixed base is better for installation in a router table, although I use my plunge router in my home made router table with no issues.

I would get a router capable of handling both 1/2 inch and 1/2 inch diameter bits. I own a Porter Cable 3 HP plunge router, very nice, but a bit heavy. I built a lot of cabinets with that router. That said, a router can be a tricky tool, and can be very dangerous, you should purchase a book that explains proper technique so you achieve good results and remain safe.

toolaholic 06-29-2012 07:52 PM

Bosch is my pick for both! The 1617 fixed base/ plunge kit for the router and the 1590 for the jigsaw!

hboogz 06-30-2012 08:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman (Post 954192)
Not sure I would buy a router from ebay, but to each their own. There are plunge routers and fixed base routers, each has its benefits. I own one of each. The plunge router is great for positioning the bit over a specific place on the workpiece, then plunging the tool into the wood to get started. The fixed base is better for installation in a router table, although I use my plunge router in my home made router table with no issues.

I would get a router capable of handling both 1/2 inch and 1/2 inch diameter bits. I own a Porter Cable 3 HP plunge router, very nice, but a bit heavy. I built a lot of cabinets with that router. That said, a router can be a tricky tool, and can be very dangerous, you should purchase a book that explains proper technique so you achieve good results and remain safe.

Thanks. I suspect the plunge router would be the better of the two when it comes to cutting out hinges for doors?

which book would you recommend. I've heard good things about the black + decker carpentry book.

I'm a believer in Bosch -- you can't beat their provantage.

oh'mike 06-30-2012 08:19 AM

Plunge routers tend to be top heavy and difficult to adjust--If using the router for hand held cuts I suggest a fixed base router with good balance---Porter Cable and Bosch fit that bill.

I have two plunge routers---when you need to plunge cut--you need a plunge router--

However I also own a small pile of fixed base routers---and those get the most use--Mike---

Daniel Holzman 06-30-2012 10:03 AM

In order to effectively cut out the hinge on a door, you need either a commercial or a home made hinge routing template. You will find that most operations with a router require a jig of some kind. If you are good, you can make most every jig you will need, and build a router table. Alternatively, you can purchase a commercially made jig for the most common operations, including hinge routing, parallel cuts, circle routing, ellipses, box joints, dovetail joints, raised panel doors, and a range of less common operations. I like to make my own jigs, but realistically it takes time, and you have to work very carefully to achieve adequate precision. Be aware that the cost of the tool is just the start, there are bits (I use all carbide bits, 1/2 inch shank when available), accessories, and templates, which often exceed the cost of the tool by a factor of two or more.

joecaption 06-30-2012 11:04 AM

I'd be looking on CPO Tool web site or Amazon.com to buy these tools.
CPO also sells factory rebuilt tools that have the same warrenty but often cost far less. Right now there having a big sale and offering free shipping on a lot of items.
Amazon has a neat feature where at the bottom of the listing there's comments from people that have bought that tool.

I have a Bosh trim router and a Porta Cable 2 HP router and both have worked flawlessly for many years, Almost no vibration.
Of my three jig saws I own by far I use my Ridgid brand 18 volt cordless one the most. There's better brands but I took a chance and bought this one on sale and it's worked great. Most of the time if your using a jig saw it's just for a few small cuts so it makes it handy to have to go find an outlet or run a cord.

PaliBob 06-30-2012 11:15 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by hboogz (Post 954558)
Thanks. I suspect the plunge router would be the better of the two when it comes to cutting out hinges for doors?.......

I have never used a plunge router this, just a fixed base router with a hinge template. There are tons of different door hinge templates (try Google) ranging from single pocket up to Template Kits. I have both of those types but I still use them with one of my fixed base routers.

rusty baker 06-30-2012 12:39 PM

I have several routers, but to fit hinges, I use a wood chisel. Just lay the hinge on the door, cut around it with a utility knife and cut out with a sharp wood chisel. Much more satifaction doing it by hand. Practice on a scrap first and take your time, nothing to it.

hboogz 06-30-2012 02:29 PM

Thanks to all that have replied. As someone who is sartin out every bit of information is very much appreciated.

Thanks for the clarification on application between fixed base and a plunge. While my primary and immediate need for a router would be for hinge cuts it's really more so for some other small wood projects I'm envisioning before the summer is over.


Re: doing by hand. Low to do it but what is the standard depth for a butt hinge that I would need to chisel out? Leaf type hinges by hand must be an exercise in patiene if done by hand. Have tons of appreciation for how it was done year's ago.


Thanks all.

oh'mike 06-30-2012 06:36 PM

The hinge will be the guide for the depth needed-- A sharp chisel is all you need for square cornered hinges--the radius corner hinges are designed for a router cut---

However--with Rustys sharp utility knife and some patience--even the radius can be chiseled out.

ratherbefishing 07-02-2012 11:27 AM

Honestly, I think the learning curve may be easier making those hinge cuts by hand. But, routers are fun, and that was what you asked. Bosch, Dewalt, and PC all make great routers. A combo kit will get you a plunge and fixed bases, with one motor. Like I said, routers are fun, you'll likely end up with several. If it was me, I'd look around for a used fixed base to start out.

Jigsaw is a similar story. Get a name brand. Bosch, Makita, PC, Dewalt, Milwaukee. Bosch has the reputation for jigsaws, but the new Makita is getting good reviews. Get one with orbital action, and BUY GOOD BLADES. I've found Bosch blades to be the best.

For router bits, check out MLCS, online. Their website/catalog is a great education. The bits work well, and I think shipping is free.

Just starting out, buy Ryobi, if you must. I'm not a fan, but some folks like it. Skil makes a router kit, too.

DexterII 07-02-2012 12:44 PM

Since you said that you would "love to learn to do it by hand", clamp a piece of scrap 2x4 in a vise, and give it a try, as Rusty advised. Frankly, if you do that, and if you did happen to have a carpenter watching over your shoulder, the only thing that he or she could possibly add would be to watch that you don't cut your fingers with the knife, and make sure that your chisels are sharp. I have a couple of router templates that I built for that purpose, but have never used them, other than to make sure that I cut them right, because I still think that the way Rusty described is just as fast and accurate as a router.

midwestcoast 07-03-2012 12:02 AM

If you're just starting out I'd say do it by hand also. Routers are expensive & not one of the first power tools to buy IMO.
Chisels are cheap and you'll need some any way. Get a kit with 3-5, use them only on wood & they should last.
I did nearly all the (oak) doors in my house by hand with no experience as a new homeowner. They came out well. Watch some Youtube videos or something on how to hold & use a chisel.

Awoodfloorguy 07-06-2012 02:51 PM

Another vote for Bosch routers. For the jig saw, I have been happy with Dewalt.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:44 PM.