DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Tools (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/)
-   -   Router (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/router-190055/)

msaeger 11-09-2013 11:50 PM

Router
 
I am trying to decide what router to get. I need it to do some edges on window and door trim. I want to try and copy this

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/64652

Would a compact one like this dewalt one be better or a full size one?

http://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DWP611-...eywords=router

ddawg16 11-10-2013 01:09 AM

I have 3 routers.....

Don't buy a Craftsman......

The one I like the most is my Ryobi plunge router. Variable speed and easy to set up.

However.....based on you wanting to copy the look you posted...I don't think you need a router....that is all 3/4" solid stock...with maybe a bit of sanding done.

Now....if you really want the top cap to have some 'character', then, yes....a router helps.

But just remember....the router is the cheap part.....it's the router bits that cost....

I would suggest a router bit kit....I have one that has about 40 different bits in it.

joecaption 11-10-2013 06:36 AM

I'm with ddawg on not really needing a router, all off the shelf trim.
I'm A Porta Cable fan. Once you have used a "cheap" router then tried a Porta Cable you will never want to go back.
Very little vibration, less noise, even the chucks hold tighter with little effort.
One tip I'll give you is all that flat stock will need to be face sanded.
It may look smooth before finishing but when the stain hits it you will see planner marks that look like lines across the finish. It does not take much to sand them out.
If you use pine make sure to use a wood conditioner before the stain or you'll end up with a blotchy finish.
Using Gel stain instead of liquid also helps.

oh'mike 11-10-2013 06:44 AM

I've heard of premature bearing failures with the DeWalt----

I have Porter Cable routers and they work well---Bosch makes a good one---

Like Ddawg mentioned,the bits are where the money goes.

You can make a dandy router table using a scrap of 1/2" cabinet plywood--and a home made fence----That speeds up the work .

ToolSeeker 11-10-2013 06:50 AM

My suggestion would be to get a router that will take both 1/2" and 1/4" bits. Also porter cable makes a router kit that gives you a couple different bases.

BigJim 11-10-2013 07:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1264721)
I've heard of premature bearing failures with the DeWalt----

I have Porter Cable routers and they work well---Bosch makes a good one---

Like Ddawg mentioned,the bits are where the money goes.

You can make a dandy router table using a scrap of 1/2" cabinet plywood--and a home made fence----That speeds up the work .

I have several routers and my favorite is the Bosch 1617, I agree the Porter Cable routers are good. If you plan to use one a good while stay away from Dewalt, Mike is right about the bearings.

ToolSeeker 11-10-2013 07:15 AM

My suggestion would be to get a router that will take both 1/2" and 1/4" bits. Also porter cable makes a router kit that gives you a couple different bases.

kwikfishron 11-10-2013 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BigJim (Post 1264728)
I have several routers and my favorite is the Bosch 1617 .

I have that Bosch also, it's a good tool. No complaints other than having to replace the switch once which couldn't have gone out at a worse time.

oh'mike 11-10-2013 07:53 AM

I have several different types of routers----for hand held work,you want a light,compact one---that Bosch 1617 is a good example----they are well balanced and very simple to fine tune the depth adjustment.

I save my plunge cutting router for ,oddly enough, Plunge cutting.
Mine is top heavy and more difficult to adjust than the smaller fixed base router---

Before you choose--handle the machine and see how comfortable it is in your hand---

joecaption 11-10-2013 08:21 AM

When I first started out I bought a cheap one from Harbor Freight.
What a mistake.
It was so loud I think I still have hearing lose.
It vibrated so much I almost dropped it thinking I was getting shocked and my hand lost all feeling for an hour after using it.
The chuck threads with so rough it looked like someone cut the threads with a file.
Within 12" the bit would slide down and destroy the piece.
I just tossed it in the trash I was so mad.
I've sold or gave away to people I did not like all my Dewalt tools. I have better things to do then be changing switches, brushes, bearings, dealing with dead battery's only a year old all the time. One brand new hammer drill I bought right out of the box would not reverse and burned up the same day I bought it.

msaeger 11-10-2013 09:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1264698)
However.....based on you wanting to copy the look you posted...I don't think you need a router....that is all 3/4" solid stock...with maybe a bit of sanding done.

At first that's what I thought then after reading the description closer I am thinking they used a chamfer bit on the top of the header and a round over bit on the lowest piece on the header.

I suppose I could do the chamfered part on the table saw but would a router do a nicer job?

Got any good ideas for the top cap? I would rather not do any routing at all if I don't need to.

I started planning on doing like this family handyman one which is all square stock but now I am thinking that is too plain maybe.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/carpen...m/step-by-step

MinnesotaSteve 11-10-2013 10:07 PM

I've been looking at doing something similar with my windows/doors in the basement, and many pictures I've seen use a thin cove moulding along the top edge, around 1/2, maybe 3/4.

Honestly, for the chamfer you probably could use a table saw. It'd just take time, cause you'd have to cut various strips off with a 45 and then a straight cut.

Using a router, you'd actually probably have to do something similar... Even with a router table, trying to put a profile on such a thin piece of wood is quite tricky. So it'd be a process of cutting the edge on a wider board, then go through the saw to get the back straight.

It's just the router would allow you some flexibility, like having only a partial profile along the edge... So it's not entirely angle cut.

Unless you are planning to use a high grade wood like that guy did(rift sawn white oak), and are ok with a stock oak/pine/cherry/maple... I'd try to buy the boards already profiled from a lumber yard. You'll have to find a lumber yard or a mill that has a full selection of millwork you can buy from.

BigJim 11-10-2013 10:32 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by msaeger (Post 1265119)
At first that's what I thought then after reading the description closer I am thinking they used a chamfer bit on the top of the header and a round over bit on the lowest piece on the header.

I suppose I could do the chamfered part on the table saw but would a router do a nicer job?

Got any good ideas for the top cap? I would rather not do any routing at all if I don't need to.

I started planning on doing like this family handyman one which is all square stock but now I am thinking that is too plain maybe.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/carpen...m/step-by-step

You can do that on a table saw but you will do a lot of sanding also. Routing there won't be any saw marks to sand out. Below is a cutter to do that will do what you need. It is called a rabbet bit and you will need different size bearings.

You will find that you will also want several small trim routers later on. I have 5 or 6 of them and I keep a small dedicated bit already set up to save set up time. I actually bought these small routers back when I was doing a lot of plastic laminate work, I am glad I did.

I stayed away from buying a whole set of bits because you will buy many that way, that you will never use. I bought the one I needed when I needed it.

msaeger 11-10-2013 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MinnesotaSteve (Post 1265126)
I've been looking at doing something similar with my windows/doors in the basement, and many pictures I've seen use a thin cove moulding along the top edge, around 1/2, maybe 3/4.

Thought about that too I probably just need to pick something I can do with stock pieces like that. Got any links to other good ideas you have found?

MinnesotaSteve 11-11-2013 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by msaeger (Post 1265156)
Thought about that too I probably just need to pick something I can do with stock pieces like that. Got any links to other good ideas you have found?

This was one I was looking at mimmicking...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pke_Ct4qGFc


I just noticed you're in Minnesota. Scherer Brothers lumber has a wide range of millwork and will sell to diyers. I've been planning to check them out, but of course they only open 8-5.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:19 PM.