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-   -   rotary hammer drill or standard hammer (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/rotary-hammer-drill-standard-hammer-70628/)

gramps416 05-05-2010 10:44 PM

rotary hammer drill or standard hammer
 
I am interested in buying a new corded hammer drill, as I have a few signs and awnings to install this year. My old hammer drill is underpowered.
I will be drilling mostly 5/8" holes.

To drill those holes in brick, I will have to use the tool on a step ladder

So here is the problem, I wanted to invest in a decent rotary hammer, but have never used one before. Is it safe to use on a ladder???
My gut is telling me that it is probably not safe, and better off just replacing my old unit with a standard hammer. I am interested to hear some thoughts from people who have used rotaries before.

thanks
-g

spark plug 05-05-2010 10:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gramps416 (Post 438132)
I am interested in buying a new corded hammer drill, as I have a few signs and awnings to install this year. My old hammer drill is underpowered.
I will be drilling mostly 5/8" holes.

To drill those holes in brick, I will have to use the tool on a step ladder

So here is the problem, I wanted to invest in a decent rotary hammer, but have never used one before. Is it safe to use on a ladder???
My gut is telling me that it is probably not safe, and better off just replacing my old unit with a standard hammer. I am interested to hear some thoughts from people who have used rotaries before.

thanks
-g

I would be inclined to go with the rotary (Hammer/Drill) Since there are less vibrations than the Hammer only. But, it truly depends on the individual and physical strength. One thing is certain. Your footing (Especially on a ladder) must be steady and sturdy. For the most part (or never) the hammering tool should not be held over the head. The best control in terms of grip and power, is when it's facing your chest.:thumbsup:!

jomama45 05-05-2010 11:17 PM

I'd actually suggest a SDS+ rotary hammer, especially for 5/8" holes. All of the roto's that i've owned in the last decade have had clutches to keep them from overpoweing an individuall. A plain old hammer drill with a 5/8" bit will have it's hands full.

VelvetFoot 05-06-2010 08:32 AM

I have this one and like it: http://www.harborfreight.com/3-in-1-...mer-97743.html

gramps416 05-06-2010 09:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jomama45 (Post 438142)
I'd actually suggest a SDS+ rotary hammer, especially for 5/8" holes. All of the roto's that i've owned in the last decade have had clutches to keep them from overpoweing an individuall. A plain old hammer drill with a 5/8" bit will have it's hands full.

how will I know that the model I am getting is an "SDS +" model?

So you guys would feel safe on a ladder???

-g

VelvetFoot 05-06-2010 09:51 AM

I've used it on a ladder in my basement.
It's pretty heavy. You'd have to have a good way of hanging it on something.

spark plug 05-06-2010 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jomama45 (Post 438142)
I'd actually suggest a SDS+ rotary hammer, especially for 5/8" holes. All of the roto's that i've owned in the last decade have had clutches to keep them from overpoweing an individuall. A plain old hammer drill with a 5/8" bit will have it's hands full.

I agree with you on that. But sometimes, personal safety --especially if someone is standing on a ladder-- outweighs efficiency.:yes:!

xxPaulCPxx 05-06-2010 01:36 PM

I've got a Bosch Bulldog, and it is great. Very easy to control, it's similar to an impact driver in that it delivers a superior function while reducing torque feedback. Very often I can drill a vertical hole one handed. You will know it's SDS because it will say SDS!

spark plug 05-06-2010 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xxPaulCPxx (Post 438317)
I've got a Bosch Bulldog, and it is great. Very easy to control, it's similar to an impact driver in that it delivers a superior function while reducing torque feedback. Very often I can drill a vertical hole one handed. You will know it's SDS because it will say SDS!

Yes. Where tools are concerned there's no compromising on quality. Unfortunately, some brands that are out there (Thankfully, only very few.) are of inferior quality. Paying a few dollars more at the outset will pay dividends in terms of productivity and safety.:thumbsup:!

gramps416 05-06-2010 10:48 PM

so it's a general consensus then, when on a ladder, don't use a rotary hammer.
thanks

Shrute 05-06-2010 10:54 PM

What's the difference between a rotary hammer and hammer drill??

jomama45 05-07-2010 12:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gramps416 (Post 438568)
so it's a general consensus then, when on a ladder, don't use a rotary hammer.
thanks

I wold have no reservation about using a 1" rated & under roto hammer on a sale ladder. It is somewhat subjective though, as I assume I'm much younger (& more than likely naive) than you are. We go through at least one or two of these tools a year also, as we use them everyday, so I'm sure I'm far more comfortable with it.

If you decide ot go with a hammerdrill, I would reccommend at least buy a quality SDS+ bit for the 5/8" holes you're drilling. Standard shank bits tend to be garbage nowadays, and can be junk in no time due to the faster RPM's put out by the hammerdrills.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shrute (Post 438570)
What's the difference between a rotary hammer and hammer drill??

About $150............................



Kidding, a hammerdrill is more of a "jack of all trades, master of none" kind of tool IMO. They spin faster, provide less percussion force, and have a standard style chuck.

A rotary hammer is a concrete specific drill only. They have either an SDS+, SDS, or spline shank chuck that requires special, but superior, bits.

They spin far slower than hammerdrills, but hammer/pound much harder.

The other advantage is that most of them have a feature to turn off the rotation, so you can intall a chisel bit to perform chipping work.

xxPaulCPxx 05-07-2010 01:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gramps416 (Post 438568)
so it's a general consensus then, when on a ladder, don't use a rotary hammer.
thanks

Um, nooooo. Look back at what I posted.

"...Very easy to control...Very often I can drill a vertical hole one handed..."

A rotary hammer is the PERFECT tool for what you want to do. It is easy to use, drills a hole fast, and doesn't torque you around like a drill can.

Heck, for a long tool like this it's still good on a ladder: The only force you need to provide is enought to keep it level and enough to engage the hammer action, about 10 pounds on both counts. I say long because that was the style I bought - the D handle. You probably want the style that looks more like a drill because it's a little more compact

This is what I have: Bosch Bulldog 7/8"

Just so you know, i used mine to drill multiple 5/8"x12" deep holes in my foundation to add threaded rod and epoxy as seimic hold downs. It cut super hard 50y.o. concrete like it was balsa wood!

PaliBob 05-07-2010 06:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gramps416 (Post 438214)
how will I know that the model I am getting is an "SDS +" model?......

SDS Bits come in two flavors i.e. '+' and 'Max'
The '+' added to the SDS name for drill bits is redundant IMO as the only difference between SDS (with or without the +) and 'SDS Max is the diameter of the shank. The SDS Max tools are extra heavy duty and require a larger motor to drive bigger drill bits or accessories such as Spade bits




Quote:

Originally Posted by Shrute (Post 438570)
What's the difference between a rotary hammer and hammer drill??

A hammer drill has a wobble plate mounted behind the armature so that when it is engaged and pressure is put on the drill the whole shebang including your hand and arm gets hammered. Until you put pressure on the drill there is no hammer action. The more force you apply the faster the hole gets drilled.

A rotary hammer drill reciprocates internally at a fixed rate. The rotary motion can be turned on or off so that it can be used as a reciprocating only tool. The speed of drilling in masonry is not dependent on how much pressure you put on the drill. In fact some reviews have claimed that they found no difference in drilling speed when they applied heavy pressure or just enough pressure to keep the drill positioned.

ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammer_drill
.

gramps416 05-07-2010 10:03 AM

So i misunderstood, roto hammers ARE safe on ladders, PaliBob you agree too?

So a "Spade" style is not best for my needs? go with the standard loooking drill shape? Who makes compact models in the $<260 range?
-gramps


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