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Old 07-31-2008, 10:19 PM   #16
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


Thanks all - I made my decision. I'm going with the Dewalt DC930ka 14.4 volt XRP.

It feels better, seems more rugged, and the batteries look to be cheaper to replace over time (if you're not going with the Ridgid lifetime stuff).

I read up on the Hitachi and it seemed that people had issues with it being rugged enough - at least the model indicated above. Thanks.

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Old 05-06-2009, 04:20 PM   #17
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


I know this is probably too late of a response for most, but I made sure to register my 14.4V RIDGID Drill/Impact Driver combo pack when I bought it in 2004. There was some fine print that "all the contents of the combo" were covered under a lifetime warranty. Sure enough, both batteries began to lose their effectiveness in 2008 and I was able to send in both packs for free replacement. Although I had to wait about 4 weeks for the replacement packs, I decided to buy another 14.4V pack simply because they were being phased out. As luck will have it, RIDGID sent me two 18V packs for the replacement. Unfortunately, I had to break out my dremel and slightly re-shape each battery pack to get them to fit in my drills and haven't had any problems running a higher voltage; in fact, I think the batteries last a little longer between charges now.

Anyway, I think others should consider this very important factor when buying a tool that will be expected to last a lifetime! You simply can't beat getting lifetime free replacement of batteries, with no shipping costs if you have a local service center.

Last edited by bill_delong; 05-06-2009 at 04:24 PM. Reason: typos
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Old 05-06-2009, 04:31 PM   #18
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


18v vs. 14.4v gives (18/14.4) = 1.6x the power, other things being equal.
2 A-h gives twice the operating time that 1 A-h gives, other things being equal.

If you can get the data, you can figure out how many cents per watt, per watthour and per inch-pound of torque you are paying. If one drill is better on all three, and sometimes that happens, then the choice is easy.

Reliability numbers are hard to come by, but a drill motor that runs 10C hotter than another will have half the life.
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Old 05-06-2009, 04:54 PM   #19
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


Yoyizit,

I appreciate that you're trying to bring real numbers into the equation, however one must keep in mind that the most important number to consider is how much $$$ one will spend on the use of their drill over a lifetime.

Since RIDGID offers a lifetime warranty on their product(s) the cost is fixed at the original purchase price. Other manufactures who may not offer free replacements for their batteries will introduce a variable cost that must be added as battery packs need replacement.

Personally, I like the fixed cost model and so far my RIDGID drills have been standing the test of time for 5 years now. I know you mentioned that the additional voltage may shorten the life of the motor, but once again, since I have a lifetime warranty, that factor does not concern me.
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Old 05-06-2009, 09:34 PM   #20
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


Quote:
Originally Posted by bill_delong View Post
Since RIDGID offers a lifetime warranty on their product(s) the cost is fixed at the original purchase price. Other manufactures who may not offer free replacements for their batteries will introduce a variable cost that must be added as battery packs need replacement.
How much more does Ridgid ask for their drills over comparable drills by other brands? Some of that money would be covering the cost of the lifetime warranty. Just curious; I have all corded drills.
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Old 05-06-2009, 09:39 PM   #21
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


Costco sells dewalt - And you can always return things to them. I've put two HARD years on my Dewalt 18V set and it takes a lickin and keeps on ticking.

My Dad likes the 14.4V dewalt because the batteries don't last as long and he can take more frequent breaks.

Concerns: dewalt hasn't gotten on the LiPo bandwagon. But then again, I haven't had a problem with my batteries.
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Old 05-06-2009, 09:55 PM   #22
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


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Costco sells dewalt - And you can always return things to them. I've put two HARD years on my Dewalt 18V set and it takes a lickin and keeps on ticking.

My Dad likes the 14.4V dewalt because the batteries don't last as long and he can take more frequent breaks.

Concerns: dewalt hasn't gotten on the LiPo bandwagon. But then again, I haven't had a problem with my batteries.
From Wiki
"
With a relatively low internal resistance, a NiCd battery can supply high surge currents.
Recently, nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) and lithium-ion batteries (Li-ion) have become more commercially available and cheaper, the former type now rivaling NiCds in cost. Where energy density is important, Ni-Cds batteries are now at a distinct disadvantage over Ni-MH and Li-ion batteries.

[Nicads] are more difficult to damage than other batteries,. . .this is in contrast, for example, to lithium ion batteries, which are highly volatile and will be permanently damaged if discharged below a minimum voltage. In addition, NiCd batteries typically last longer, in terms of number of charge/discharge cycles, than other rechargeable batteries,
"
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Old 05-06-2009, 10:56 PM   #23
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


[URL="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OsBc8RqSKU"]

I especially like the audio of boys giggling. Mostly, LiPo fires are reported in the RC car world.
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Old 05-07-2009, 09:40 AM   #24
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


I bought my combo set for $188 back in 2004. It included 2 14.4V NiCd battery packs, a universal charger, a 3/8" keyless drill and an impact driver. That price came out to just a few bucks more than a cheap Ryobi that I was considering at the time. Yes it was a little more expensive up front, but then I started saving money 4 years later when I got my first set of free replacement battery packs which cost about $50 each. I can't begin to imagine how much more money I will save in the many years ahead as I go through additional battery packs!

Seriously, it's a no-brainer to buy a reputable brand that offers lifetime warranties on their products. On the other hand, if I need to buy a tool that will see occasional use, then I will buy from Harbor Freight, I can usually buy a tool there for what it would cost to rent the same tool for a few days at Home Depot.

Oh and the trick with Harbor Freight is to only buy their 4 year warranty on the high dollar items. Then you simply exchange the tool for a new one every 4 years and re-purchase another 4 year warranty. They remanufacture the tool and everyone is a winner! You just have to remember to exchange the tool BEFORE your warranty expires or you're S.O.L.

The way I keep track of all my tools that have warranties on them, is by placing a piece of masking tape on them and write the EXPIRATION DATE on it with a permanent marker so I know when to exchange the tool.

There have been several tools already that I replaced with an even higher quality since the older model was no longer manufactured, now who can complain with that system?!?
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Old 05-07-2009, 09:44 AM   #25
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


BTW, my replacement packs came in NiMh format and supposedly have a much higher capacity than the original NiCd's that came with my drills. I think they went from 0.8Ah to 1.5Ah. I can only assume that my next replacement packs will be 4.5Ah as that seems to be the new standard for SC's these days.

Last edited by bill_delong; 05-07-2009 at 09:48 AM.
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Old 05-07-2009, 10:28 AM   #26
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Ridgid doesn't use NiMh batteries. They only have NiCd and Li batteries. Their compact NiCd batteries are 1.3Ah I think.

The standard Ridgid charger is not set up for NiMh batteries either. The old ones just charged NiCd, and the newer ones do both the NiCd and the Li batteries.

With the NiCd batteries the charger looks for a drop in voltage to detect the end of the charge cycle. With NiMh batteries this is less pronounced, and may not be detected. Charging NiMh batteries on the charger would have one less level of safety.

NiMh batteries do have a higher capacity than NiCd, but there are problems with them. They lose charge quicker than NiCd while sitting on the shelf, and do not work in cold temperatures.
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Old 05-07-2009, 09:39 PM   #27
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


Highlander,

You are absolutely correct. The 14.4V pack that I bought on clearance was model # 130254008 which has 2.5Ah and it shocked me to learn that they could get that much capacity out of a NiCd. The 18V packs that I got under warranty were model # 130252004 and they only have 1.25Ah. Surprisingly, the 18V packs seem to last a little longer than the 14.4 pack per charge, but I'm sure someone here will crunch the numbers to determine if that's accurate or not. I haven't done any lab testing, it just seems to work out that way when I'm driving a lot of screws... perhaps the motor doesn't have to work as hard with the extra voltage?
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Old 05-08-2009, 07:20 AM   #28
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


The 14.4 volt 2.5 Ah battery pack should run considerably longer. Power (or work done by the tool) is measured in Watts. Watts = Volts x Amps. If both packs were new and freshly charged, I would expect you to be able to get at least 50% more work out of the 14.4 volt pack. Over time NiCd batteries seem to lose charge quicker while sitting on the shelf, and this might be the effect that you are seeing.
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Old 05-08-2009, 09:45 AM   #29
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Ridgid 18v vs Dewalt 14.4v xrp vs el cheapo?


Quote:
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The 14.4 volt 2.5 Ah battery pack should run considerably longer.
= 36 watt-hours.
18/1.25 = ~23 watt-hours.

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