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Old 05-26-2011, 03:20 AM   #1
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I came up with this idea for a power tool while watching a professional framer blaze through some cuts. He would rest the board across his foot so it was angled towards him and finish the cut with a circular saw. I use this method as well, but I am a remodel guy so while I do a little framing, I don't do it 24/7. I would need a speed square to make those cuts, this guy on the other hand had linear guide rails for arms. Scary fast, scary accurate.

This is a tool for the rest of us that don't have linear guide rails for arms,one that you can drop down anywhere on the jobsite and knock out those cuts with speed and accuracy. Check it out and if you like it, I would really appreciate it if you posted a response at the end of the article. hopefully if there is enough positive feedback a tool manufacture will pick it up.


Last edited by Gary in WA; 05-27-2011 at 09:36 PM. Reason: Remove ad link per forum advertising rules.
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Old 05-26-2011, 09:58 AM   #2
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Old 05-26-2011, 10:09 AM   #3
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As a professional framer, I can tell you that there will never be a market for that in our industry. Cutting a 2x4 in the field is very simple, requires a tool that is inexpensive, and requires no adjustment to change the angle. Your market would have to be the DIY market.
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Old 05-26-2011, 12:14 PM   #4
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Blondesense,

I wish, I would be collecting royatly checks allready



sixeightten,

It is not designed to only cut 2x4's but has the cross cut capacity to handle a 2x12. It is basicaly just a miter saw that doesn't require any external accessories or set up time and there is definitely a market for miter saws. I should have cut somethng other than a 2x4 in the video, sorry for the confusion.

You guys are pretty amazing with a circular saw and probably don't even use miter saws that much. I am a remodel contractor, so a miter saw is the first tool I bring to the jobsite.

Last edited by TimsTools; 05-26-2011 at 03:29 PM.
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Old 05-26-2011, 12:19 PM   #5
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I figured it would cut something larger, but what would be the practical use in our field? If we are cutting rafters, it would require moving it from one end to the other, setting it for different cuts, and unless it goes past 60 degrees, a lot of the seat cuts couldn't be made anyway. I think you have a novel idea there, just not certain it is marketable. I am always slow to discourage someone from a new tool design, as I myself have had a few ideas from time to time.
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Old 05-26-2011, 12:42 PM   #6
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sixeightten,
I hear ya, Framers just don't use miter saws that much.

For the rest of us that don't have your skills with a circular saw, we need them. This would be the General, remodel, finish, decking, fencing, siding and flooring contractors. For them, having a miter saw that doesn't require any external accessories(such as a stand) or set up time would be a great benefit to them.
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Old 05-26-2011, 03:28 PM   #7
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I just wanted to thank everyone that is posting a response at the end of the Toolsinaction article. I know it is so much easier to just lurk (being a self proclaimed lurker myself) that you guys are taking to the time to responds is greatly appreciated. Thanks...
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Old 05-26-2011, 04:09 PM   #8
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I agree with sixeightten that framers would never buy it. When doing finish my chop saw is always set up next to the table saw so why would I want to bend over. I do however see some possible advantages for decking since already bent over most of the time anyway.
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Old 05-26-2011, 05:31 PM   #9
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Kwikfishron,

I can see where framers might not purchase this saw, However I do think this would benefit finish contractors. For example,

1. baseboard could be scatered around the room and knocked out in place with this saw rather than having to make many trips back and forth to a cut off station.

2. In general, having this extremely portable cut off station at your side would save many trips back and forth to the cut off station since any adjustments could be made at the point of work. for example, if an adjustment needs to made upstairs and the cut off station is downstairs.

3. When triming the outside of a house, where setting up a cut off station can be a pain(not to even metion moving it) This portable cut off staion could easily follow the contractor around the house as he works.
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Old 05-26-2011, 05:52 PM   #10
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That's a cool invention and I'd probably find a way to use it if I had one. However, as other guys have stated, it would have no place on one of my framing jobs.

As for baseboard, I measure and cut the entire room at a chopsaw table set up in the largest room in the house. It's very rare for an adjustment to be made after the initial cut.

Decking would be a possibility, but after being bent in half most of the day, standing upright to make the cuts is welcome relief.

The other thing is, for guys who have employees, that tool probably wouldn't last long, or stay accurate for long anyway.

These comments aren't meant to discourage you, but more accurately to give you honest insight from a guy who's been in the game for over 25 years.

Good luck with it. Hope to see one in use sometime. I'd say I have another 25 years to go.
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Old 05-27-2011, 02:15 AM   #11
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loneframer,

"That's a cool invention and I'd probably find a way to use it if I had one. However, as other guys have stated, it would have no place on one of my framing jobs."

Thanks, I think you would find that having what is essentialy a compact portable cut off station with zero set up time that could easily follow you around the jobsite would improve your efficency and reduce many of those time consuming trips back and forth to a stationary cut off station.



"As for baseboard, I measure and cut the entire room at a chopsaw table set up in the largest room in the house. It's very rare for an adjustment to be made after the initial cut."

I don't have your skills, it is hard for me to account for corners that are not square, out of plumb walls, etc... Also for outside corners it is easier for me to mark and cut those in place.



"Decking would be a possibility, but after being bent in half most of the day, standing upright to make the cuts is welcome relief."

I hear ya, but the reason framer's bend over and cut lumber resting off of their foot is because it is just both easier and faster to do than carrying this same piece of lumber back to the cut off station. This is especialy true with decking since these boards are often 2x6 material and long as possible to reduce the amount of joints. While they would have to bend over for a couple of seconds,in the long run it would be easier on their bodies.



"The other thing is, for guys who have employees, that tool probably wouldn't last long, or stay accurate for long anyway."

The saw shown in the video was just a prototype, a tool manufacture would build one that is quite a bit beefier, more like the rendering below. Really it is just a miter saw with an extra pivot and would withstand just as much abuse as any other miter saw.



"These comments aren't meant to discourage you, but more accurately to give you honest insight from a guy who's been in the game for over 25 years.

Good luck with it. Hope to see one in use sometime. I'd say I have another 25 years to go."

I understand completely, you are a fellow professional voicing his concerns and while you did have some issues with the tool, you seemed open to give it a try. Really, what more can I ask for?

Way cool username by the way :-)

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Old 05-27-2011, 04:15 AM   #12
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Tim, I've seen the framers you're referring to, cutting off their foot.

It's truly a rare occurrence on my job.

Joists are either cut to length off the stack or installed with a center lap and the tails cut off in place.

Wall parts are cut on a large chop table where a stop block can be used for repetitive cuts with no measuring. Everything from odd stud lengths, to wall plates, to small window parts.

I've been criticized for my methods and in no way claim that they are better than anyone elses, just what has worked for me over the years, with skilled and unskilled labor.

I'd love to give your tool a try sometime, but I'm not sure I'd buy it to try it. Just being honest.
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Old 05-27-2011, 12:40 PM   #13
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loneframer,

I appreciate your honesty, maybe you would find that having a portable version of that large chop saw station would improve your efficiency, but then again maybe not.

Since this is a new concept though, I thought it would be a good idea to list several situations other than production framing where I believe this tool would help us in the field.

1. For remodel or general contractors, this would be a great punch list saw. Where you could easily run it around the house, knocking out those remaining odds and ends and collect that paycheck.

2. On small jobs, where a stationary cut off station would just get in the way or isn't worth the time. This would be the perfect miter saw to throw in the back of the truck.

3. On larger remodel jobs, where as opposed to production framing cut off lengths are anything but standard, this saw would reduce many of those time consuming trips back and forth to the stationary cut off station.

4. For fencing contractors or anyone doing a fence, the horizontal 2x material could be scattered between the posts and knocked out in place with this saw. This also applies when adjusting the fence boards to follow the terrain. Having a portable cut off station that could follow them as they work would be a huge time saver. A cordless version (36V so we can do some real work) would be really nice in this situation.
5. For exterior siding or trim contractors, where setting up a conveniently located stationary cut off station can be difficult and moving it around even more so. This saw could easily follow them around the house.

6. #5 applies even more so to decking contractors, since the length and width of the material they deal with requires a very large and heavy miter saw stand. At 1/10th the size, the capacity of this saw is really only limited by the area around it and could handle a 40 footer if need be.

7. For flooring contractors, this saw could easily follow them up the cut side of the room. where again, a cordless version would really increase their efficiency.

8. For trim contractors, having a independent portable cut off station that could be at their side and move with them as they go from one window or door to the next would benefit these contractors as well.

9. for the DIY user, this would be the perfect miter saw to knock out those small jobs without having to carry around and store a large miter saw stand.

I am sure there are many more situations where having a portable independent cut off station would benefit the user. It has taken alot of blood and sweat to bring this tool to where it is now, hopefully it will get produced and we will find out.
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Old 05-27-2011, 09:37 PM   #14
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