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Old 02-25-2013, 06:48 AM   #16
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Pneumatic routers


Quality air tools are as expensive as electric tools wear out faster and you need a 10,000 dollar air compressor verses a couple dollar outlet

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Old 02-25-2013, 07:18 PM   #17
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Vacuous answers with no explanation are indistinguishable from dogma. I've spent my life being told that things can't or shouldn't be done, only to go break all the rules and get much better results than anyone else. That's not a constant; it's a thing that happens often, but not a dominating result or a guarantee.
My, don't you think highly of yourself. If you'd stop yapping on about how special you think you are for one moment and actually read Kirk's response, you'd see that he did give explanations for his opinion. But you felt compelled to act like a douche to him anyway.

For what it's worth I'm kind of a fan of air tools. I've got among other things some die grinders, drills and sanders. My shop compressor is a pretty good sized one, 60 gallon tank with a 2 cylinder, 230v compressor. Y'know what? It ain't big enough for continuous use for a lot of those tools. It puts out about 1/4 of what you need for the router someone else linked.

So my advice is the same as Kirk's; get an electric router. Reasons are the same as kirk gave; it would require a huge compressor to run it.

Kirk gave good practical advice, backed up with a sound explanation. Tthere was no reason to be a jerk.
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Old 02-25-2013, 07:45 PM   #18
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Years ago I worked in a air powered shop, was a different industry, but same concept with air tools.
This was a 3 man shop and we retreaded semi truck tires.
We had 2 chambers to cure the tires in, 1 would hold 11 tires, the other would hold 22 tires.

How many tools could 3 guys use at one time?
We had 3 phase electrical, a 25 horse main compressor and a 15 horse backup, when air pressure dropped to a certain level, back up would kick in and pick up the slack.

We could run air tools as needed with this setup, at times we would make the back up kick in.

Whenever we loaded a chamber, it was coffee time. wait for compressors to catch up.
We finally replaced the 15 horse with a screw, and moved the 25 horse to backup.
Now when we loaded the chambers, we had a shorter 15 min wait to get back to work.
People just do not understand how much air it takes to run air tools at a steady rate ... go look at a automotive paint shop and see what they have to supply the workers with air tools .... is just incredible and to think about supplying air to 1 router ... just not even worth considering.
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Old 02-25-2013, 08:51 PM   #19
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Hey bluefox,

A little more information for you. An air router like the one linked earlier costs about $1200. Compressor big enough to run it is going to run you $3k+, oh, and you're going to need 3 phase service in your garage to run it. But I'm positive that makes a lot more sense for a hobbyist than a $300 electric router tha plugs into your standard 120v outlet and does the same thing.

Why don't you tell us agin how those of us with electric routers are fools blindly following dogma without any deeper understanding.

Last edited by A Squared; 02-25-2013 at 09:13 PM.
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Old 02-26-2013, 06:11 AM   #20
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Well,well ,well---you guys just don't want to embrace a new idea-----

I'm still wondering what dogma means---Magma I know---let me go look that up----I'm just a dumb carpenter-----
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:54 PM   #21
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I don't like answers in the form of "Don't do that, do this instead."

Vacuous answers with no explanation are indistinguishable from dogma. I've spent my life being told that things can't or shouldn't be done, only to go break all the rules and get much better results than anyone else. That's not a constant; it's a thing that happens often, but not a dominating result or a guarantee.

The two strategies for acquiring competence are either A) make your own mistakes; or B) learn from the mistakes of others. Skittering away from things that didn't work out for everyone else isn't (B); you don't understand why it didn't work and what challenges and trade-offs and mistakes were made, and you can't apply that understanding to future problems. You must probe those people for their knowledge and experience. Yes, it shows that you don't know what you're doing; if you had any clue what you were trying to do, why would you need to bother other people about the details?

Tangential: There is a great failure in higher education by which we teach dogma, rather than knowledge. Procedural technical concepts, while often correct, are taught as simple cause-effect and raw information with little explanation. IT is the poster child for this because it's absolutely loaded with examples of concepts that are backed by impossibly complex theory that's never touched, but more importantly with very simple concepts like "we tried the other obvious things, and here are the problems we avoid with what we're teaching you here" which are also never touched. It is uninteresting to explain the wrong way of doing something--and hence the reasoning behind the right way (the reason we do X is because doing something other than X is wrong, because...).

Your response had information, and was interesting. Things like "You need a big tank and a high CFM rating, so don't do that" are not very informative... I can get a big tank for like $400. What you said is different; it indicates that the concept of a "big tank" varies depending on what we're talking about, and that there are very big tanks. This is the same concept that follows when something absolutely massive is ... small, because the problem scope it's used in is typically bigger than that (like the small diesel generator we have at my job, bigger than my house--whereas a large generator would fit in the corner of my basement and provide 5-10 times as much power as I could possibly use).

Faults. Failure modes. Problem scoping. Appropriateness of a solution. Costs, trade-offs, scale.

Air powered table saws are the cats a$$. I would go all air if I were you.
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Old 02-26-2013, 04:32 PM   #22
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Hey bluefox,

A little more information for you. An air router like the one linked earlier costs about $1200. Compressor big enough to run it is going to run you $3k+, oh, and you're going to need 3 phase service in your garage to run it. But I'm positive that makes a lot more sense for a hobbyist than a $300 electric router tha plugs into your standard 120v outlet and does the same thing.

Why don't you tell us agin how those of us with electric routers are fools blindly following dogma without any deeper understanding.
When he gets better results with his $5,000 pneumatic router than you do with your $300 electric router (as he has with all the other radical things he has done) you will feel really silly!
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Old 02-26-2013, 04:34 PM   #23
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Well,well ,well---you guys just don't want to embrace a new idea-----

I'm still wondering what dogma means---Magma I know---let me go look that up----I'm just a dumb carpenter-----
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogma_%28film%29

I am not sure how it is relevant, but this is what it is.
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Old 02-26-2013, 11:56 PM   #24
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Air powered table saws are the cats a$$. I would go all air if I were you.
I think that he should get a car that runs on compressed air. There's zero emissions and air is free!
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Old 02-27-2013, 07:20 AM   #25
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Since apparently you don't like the common sense answers you have gotten here. My suggestion would be go buy the biggest, baddest, most expensive air router you can find. Be sure to come back and let us know how it works out for you.

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